N.S. government shakes up senior leadership in Education, Health departments

·2 min read
Dr. Kevin Orrell has left his job at CEO of Nova Scotia's Office of Healthcare Professionals Recruitment to become an adviser to the president of Cape Breton University. (Robert Short/CBC - image credit)
Dr. Kevin Orrell has left his job at CEO of Nova Scotia's Office of Healthcare Professionals Recruitment to become an adviser to the president of Cape Breton University. (Robert Short/CBC - image credit)

The winds of change are blowing among the senior ranks of leadership in Nova Scotia's Health and Education departments, and they come with hefty price tags.

The government announced on Wednesday that the Office of Healthcare Professionals Recruitment will now be led by Dr. Nicole Boutilier and Craig Beaton.

Boutilier is also the vice-president of medicine for Nova Scotia Health, while Beaton serves as associate deputy minister of the Health Department. Neither will receive additional compensation

They take over the work of Dr. Kevin Orrell, the office's former CEO. He became a special adviser to the president of Cape Breton University on Sept. 1.

According to a news release, Orrell will focus on efforts to expand the university's health faculties. In March, the provincial government announced $5 million for the university's "strategic health initiative."

Jean Laroche / CBC
Jean Laroche / CBC

CBU and the province will share the cost of Orrell's $350,000 salary.

Orrell, a surgeon by training with roots in Cape Breton, was deputy health minister before being appointed CEO of the recruitment office by Premier Tim Houston about a year ago.

There has been speculation for several months about Orrell's future, however, Houston and Health Minister Michelle Thompson refused to comment throughout the summer.

The province also announced changes to senior leadership of the Education Department on Wednesday.

Cathy Montreuil will be leaving the deputy minister post with a severance of $227,289.

While the government searches for a permanent replacement, a former deputy minister with the province and chair of the Nova Scotia Forestry Innovation Transition Trust will fill the role.

No interviews provided

Rosalind Penfound will be paid a prorated salary based on how long she works, with $206,262 as the annual measure. A government spokesperson said the search for a permanent deputy is expected to take less than six months.

The province also announced that Elwin LeRoux is leaving his post as executive director of the Halifax Regional Centre for Education to become the new associate deputy minister of Education.

The government would not make anyone available for an interview.

MORE TOP STORIES