N.W.T. reports 30 new COVID-19 cases, issues exposure notice for Capitol Theatre

·3 min read
Yellowknife continues to be the community with the most active cases in the N.W.T. On Friday, the office of the chief public health officer reported there are 145 active cases in the city and issued a public exposure notice for the Capitol Theatre on Sept. 14. (Liny Lamberink/CBC - image credit)
Yellowknife continues to be the community with the most active cases in the N.W.T. On Friday, the office of the chief public health officer reported there are 145 active cases in the city and issued a public exposure notice for the Capitol Theatre on Sept. 14. (Liny Lamberink/CBC - image credit)

The N.W.T. is reporting 30 new COVID-19 cases across the territory Friday.

The number of active cases now stands at 248 across the territory, an increase of 28 in one day, according to a Friday evening news release.

The majority of the cases are in Yellowknife where there are 145 cases reported, 11 more than on Thursday.

The office of the chief public health officer (OCPHO) also issued a public exposure notice for the Capitol Theatre in Yellowknife for Sept. 14 between 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. The OCPHO said that "anyone who was in the theatre featuring Malignant, or in the common spaces before and after the movie, should self-monitor. If symptoms develop, immediately self-isolate, and arrange testing."

Cases across the territory

The number of cases in Behchokǫ̀, the community with the second most cases in the territory, continues to climb. The N.W.T. is reporting 46 cases in the community, an increase of eight from Thursday.

In Whatì, there are 33 cases being reported, an increase of six from Thursday. The community's daycare is planning to reopen on Monday.

In the Sahtu region, which experienced an outbreak in mid-August, there are now seven active cases, five in Fort Good Hope and two in Norman Wells.

There are five cases in Hay River and Kátł'odeeche First Nation. The local state of emergency in Kátł'odeeche First Nation has expired but the community government is still asking residents to stay home until Sept. 26.

Other communities in the N.W.T. that have active cases are Łutselkʼe with three, Fort Providence with two, and one each in Inuvik, Fort Resolution and Fort Liard.

There are also two active at the NWT Power Corporations' Snare Hydro System worksite, and one each at the Diavik diamond mine and the Gahcho Kué diamond mine.

Sahtu region updates

The Canadian Rangers are, as of Saturday, no longer needed to help deal with the current COVID-19 outbreak in the Sahtu region.

In a community service update Friday evening, the territorial government said two Rangers in each Délınę, Fort Good Hope and Norman Wells would no longer be needed.

However, the activation period for Rangers is being extended until Oct. 1, 2021.

In Fort Good Hope, some students are also heading back to class.

Grades 10-12 are returning to in-person learning on Monday, while Grades 7-9 will return the following Monday, Sept. 27. Students in junior kindergarten up to Grade 6 will continue learning online until further notice.

The community's Radilih Koe Housing Association has also been re-opened.

In Tulita, the housing authority office has also been reopened and students will return to in-class learning on Monday.

The local state of emergency has been extended until Wednesday in Tulita.

No voting if you're self-isolating

In its news release, the OCPHO said it has worked with Elections Canada to make sure voting can take place safely on Monday.

It is reminding voters that if they're self-isolating for any reason, they can't go to the polls on Monday and vote.

"Polling stations must be safe," the release reads. "To protect the health and safety of all residents during this outbreak, individuals under isolation orders must remain in isolation."

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