National Gallery of Canada unveils two positions to promote diversity and inclusivity

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OTTAWA — The National Gallery of Canada has named two leaders to newly created roles aimed at encouraging more diversity and inclusivity within the organization.

Angela Cassie will serve as vice-president of strategic transformation and inclusion, while Tania Lafrenière will be senior vice-president of people, culture and belonging, the NGC said on Tuesday.

Cassie steps into the job after holding numerous senior positions at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg, including operational management. Prior to that Cassie worked at the Department of Canadian Heritage.

Lafrenière has worked as head of human resources at CBC-Radio Canada, and held leadership roles at Groupe Nordik, PSAC, and the Canadian Red Cross.

In 2019, she founded her own consultancy firm, and the NGC says she will "institute a new people-centred approach to HR management" that promotes "a true culture of collaboration."

Both positions come as the NGC looks towards outlining its first strategic plan, which is focused on modernizing the organization to make it more reflective of Canada. The plan, which will be made public in the first quarter, will focus on "justice, equity, diversity and inclusion" at the NGC.

Last November, Barbara Stead-Coyle became the NGC's newest chief executive officer, coming to the organization from the non-profit health-care sector where she was known for "strategic transformations nationally and regionally, as well as strong fundraising impact."

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 5, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Note to readers: This is a corrected story. A previous version had a typo in Canadian Museum for Human Rights.