Next Nissan GT-R outlined by CEO; new platform definite, electric possible

·2 min read



Nissan CEO Makoto Uchida recently revealed his thoughts on the long-awaited next-generation Nissan GT-R. Firstly, the evolution of Japan's iconic supercar will feature an all-new platform, he says, but how much it's electrified, if at all, is still to be determined.

The head honcho explained while speaking to Autocar, "Whether we go to a lot of electrification or none at all, we can achieve a lot power-wise. But we’re definitely making a new platform, and our goal is clear: the GT-R has to be the quickest car of its kind. It has to own the track. And it has to play the advanced technology game. But that doesn’t mean it has to be electric.”

Put another way, despite an all-new platform, it sure seems likely that the next GT-R will still be powered by some form of internal-combustion engine. Maybe it gets an ICE mated to a hybrid-electric system, but an EV seems doubtful. This, despite many high-end brands shifting to all-electric lineups, even some of the ones you'd least expect, as well as Nissan's own Infiniti. Regardless of the powertrain, Uchida's vision for the GT-R seems clear, including it having a different mission than the new Nissan Z.

"It’s something that’s a really professional sports vehicle with no compromise. The Z is for someone like me who enjoys sports cars," he said, referring to the fact that he personally owned a Nissan Fairlady Z as his first car before joining Nissan. "The GT-R is a professional machine and we need to work it out for the future.”

The current GT-R has been on the same platform since its introduction in 2007, some 14 years ago. And while it has continuously evolved during that time and in many ways is still considered the one to beat, enthusiasts are craving more. The good news is that Nissan seems committed to a ground-up re-imagining, unlike the 2023 Nissan Z, which remains a heavily reworked version of the current gen (albeit with a far more powerful engine and complete reskin).

To those who prefer the raw fury of an ICE, the next GT-R could be a welcome change setting itself apart from the soon-to-be-ubiquitous electric high-end car. Others might regard this as a signal that the next-generation GT-R would arrive and immediately be behind the times. Whatever it ends up being, it seems destined to be unique. Oh, and the promised world-beating performance probably won't hurt either.

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