Nick Offerman’s ‘powerfully moving’ return to ancestral land

Nick Offerman appeared on Who Do You Think You Are?, Sunday, and the former Parks and Recreation star learned quite a bit about his 8-times great-grandmother. Eve was a literate tavern owner during colonial times and had a complicated relationship with the indigenous people.

In the early 1700’s, Eve attempted to trick some Mohawks into giving her their land by getting them drunk.

Eve and her family were stopped and then evicted from the Mohawk’s land, which Offerman found comfort in.

“I just have to say, I mean, at least in all of these recountings,” said Offerman, “I am moved by the even-handed dealing of the Mohawk Nation.”

Years later, Eve’s great-grandson fought in the Revolutionary War and was granted a portion of those same lands as the British-allied Mohawk Nation had fled into Canada. And Offerman got to visit his ancestral lands with his mom and aunt.

“Being here, on this land, it's powerfully moving,” said Offerman.

Video Transcript

NICK OFFERMAN: It begs the question across these couple of decades, what happened to the land?

KYLIE MAR: Nick Offerman appeared on "Who Do You Think you Are?" Sunday, and the former "Parks and Recreation" star learned that his eight times great grandmother Eve was a Tavern owner during colonial times. And that she had a complicated relationship with the Indigenous people.

- The Mohawks did allow this Tavern to be established in their vicinity probably because they saw value in it.

KYLIE MAR: In the early 1700s, Eve attempted to trick some Mohawks into giving her their land by getting them drunk.

NICK OFFERMAN: Gave them as much rum as made them beastly drunk and then threw three of the drunkest of them into a sled prepared for that purpose in order to bring them to Albany to sign a deed for the land they live on.

KYLIE MAR: Eve and her family were stopped and then evicted from the Mohawks land.

NICK OFFERMAN: I just have to say, I mean, at least in all of these recountings, I'm moved by the even handed dealing of the Mohawk Nation.

KYLIE MAR: Years later Eve's great grandson fought in the Revolutionary War and was granted a portion of those same lands as the British Allied Mohawk Nation had fled into Canada. And Offerman got to visit his ancestral lands with his mom and aunt.

NICK OFFERMAN: So being here, on this land, it's powerfully moving.

- Yeah, pretty amazing.

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