No fruit left behind! Fruit picking program opens in Humber Valley

·2 min read
Volunteers in the Humber Valley area are working to help rescue fruit that may be left to rot during the season, offering help to pick fruit for people who may be unable to access it. (Submitted by Katie Temple - image credit)
Volunteers in the Humber Valley area are working to help rescue fruit that may be left to rot during the season, offering help to pick fruit for people who may be unable to access it. (Submitted by Katie Temple - image credit)
Submitted by Katie Temple
Submitted by Katie Temple

Growing season in Newfoundland and Labrador can vary in success from year to year, but a team of Corner Brook volunteers wants to make sure no piece of fruit is left behind from this year's harvest.

The Western Environment Centre launched its fifth Fruit Rescue initiative this summer, aimed at helping make sure no edible fruit goes to waste in the region.

"We're willing to pick anything that a homeowner is unable to pick themselves, either because they don't have time or they have mobility issues or maybe they just don't want the fruit themselves," Katie Temple, the centre's executive director, told CBC Radio's Weekend AM Saturday.

Temple said the program has had a slow start this summer, but usually tends to pick up around apple picking season. The group also sees requests from people in the nearby Humber Valley area to pick fruits like raspberries, plums, cherries and pears.

Once all the fruit is picked, the harvest gets divided equally between the homeowner, volunteers and a group or charity that could use the food like a food bank.

"[Volunteers] turn the apples into cider or baked goods, so that's wonderful," Temple said.

Submitted by Katie Temple
Submitted by Katie Temple

Temple said the main goal of the program is to make sure no food goes to waste in the area, which could help add a layer of food security for some people.

"The general public loves the idea that there's a group that is tackling food waste… It's very sad to see any food going to waste," she said.

"It's a concern for so many people for so many different reasons, especially here in Newfoundland and Labrador."

While the program is only available in the Humber Valley for the time being, Temple said she hopes it can be taken on by others across the province in the future.

Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

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