Non-profit looks to tiny home to replace big fundraiser

·2 min read
The tiny home is 450 square feet, which includes two loft bedrooms.  (Gary Moore/CBC - image credit)
The tiny home is 450 square feet, which includes two loft bedrooms. (Gary Moore/CBC - image credit)

A non-profit organization in Fredericton had to get creative this year to find a way to replace its annual major fundraiser that was cancelled because of COVID-19 restrictions.

The president of Big Brothers, Big Sisters of Fredericton and Oromocto's board of directors, Anita Legere was concerned about how the group was going to make up the money during a pandemic.

"My first thought was — 'Oh,no — what are we going to do?" she said.

"Because obviously it takes money to run a non-profit and all non-profits are basically in the same situation right now."

Intrigued by the tiny home movement happening around the world, Legere said the organization thought big, and settled on small.

The tiny home has propane appliances and a solar powered fridge.
The tiny home has propane appliances and a solar powered fridge. (Gary Moore/CBC)

And in a world where bigger foundations are selling tickets on large homes — Big Brothers, Big Sisters have a tiny home up for grabs.

"Well, I like the idea because it is unique, it's something that is totally different. It's something that a lot of people are interested in," Legere said.

"There are people that are downsizing that want to go into something smaller, there are people that just want to hook it up to a truck and travel the country."

Oromocto based carpenter Mike Roy was nearly finished building his first tiny home when Legere came knocking.

Carpenter Mike Roy, and Big Brothers, Big Sisters president of the board of directors Anita Legere standing outside of the tiny home.
Carpenter Mike Roy, and Big Brothers, Big Sisters president of the board of directors Anita Legere standing outside of the tiny home. (Gary Moore/CBC)

"I was really excited to help Big Brothers, Big Sisters and also it would be really good to help push awareness on alternative ways of living in the province," Roy said.

Much like Legere, Roy said he had been fascinated with watching shows about tiny homes for a few years and wanted to build one.

"It was a huge learning curve, but it was also a really fun project," said the general contractor, who's planning to build more tiny homes.

Roy said the biggest challenge with building the tiny home compared to an average sized home was learning how to utilize the space without a blueprint.

The loft bedrooms have a panoramic view.
The loft bedrooms have a panoramic view.(Gary Moore/CBC)

"This just started with a picture," Roy said standing outside the tiny home. "There's not too much to the inside of them."

The home is 450 square feet including two lofts that are bedrooms.

Roy said most people are surprised with how much room is inside the tiny home.

"The very first reaction that comes to mind for me. of anybody that's ever gone into the tiny home, the first thing they say is, 'I can't believe how big this is'," said Roy.

The home is built on wheels and can be towed similar to an RV.