Nova Scotia finance minister says she will leave politics when next election called

·2 min read

HALIFAX — A key member of outgoing Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil's cabinet says she too will leave politics once the next provincial election is called.

Finance Minister Karen Casey, who is also deputy premier, made the announcement following a cabinet meeting Thursday, saying that after 15 years representing the riding of Colchester North, she is ready to retire and wants to spend more time with her four grandchildren.

Casey said while she had been pondering her future for some time, she only made a final decision over the last week.

"Fifteen years, I think, is a good amount of public service to give to my constituents," Casey told reporters. "I'm happy with the work that we (government) have achieved, and it's time to let somebody else represent Colchester North."

Casey, a former teacher, also served in the education and health portfolios and was named deputy premier in 2017.

Over her time in the education portfolio, she was instrumental in the Liberal government's move to rein in contract demands by the province's teachers — a battle that ultimately saw the imposition of a contract that ended a two-month work-to-rule campaign by public school teachers in February 2017.

As finance minister, Casey also played a part in helping the government table five consecutive balanced budgets.

"I learned a lot personally in the finance portfolio, but there were challenges there, and I quite like a challenge," she said.

McNeil, who is leaving politics next month, said he counts Casey as a personal friend and believes she played an "integral role" in helping return the province to fiscal health.

"We have really run a duo operation here in lots of ways," McNeil said. "She is one person that I have always sought counsel of in my most difficult days."

Casey was a former interim leader of the Progressive Conservatives and defected to the Liberals in January, 2011 at McNeil's invitation.

"That allowed me to join a caucus and a leader ... whose values I thought I shared," said Casey. "What motivated me? It would be knowing that my ideas and those of my constituents and me as a person would be respected."

Casey confirmed she would stay on until the next election, which must be called by the spring of 2022.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 21, 2021.

Keith Doucette, The Canadian Press