Old coal mine in Nova Scotia houses Canada's first underground garden

·1 min read
Old coal mine in Nova Scotia houses Canada's first underground garden
Old coal mine in Nova Scotia houses Canada's first underground garden

William Crouse didn't have fluorescent lights and the plants he grew deep below the surface in 1930 were real.

A new display in a former coal mine in Glace Bay, situated in Cape Breton, N.S., pays tribute to Crouse's garden. The revamped site lays claim to the title of Canada's first underground garden.

"He was 682 feet down the shaft. He had the spot made right there where the men used to pass by it to go get to the rake, and that's where he had his little garden at. And he looked after it all the while he was there," said Sheldon Gouthro, a former coal miner.

Crouse brought the topsoil down from above, but he had plenty of fertilizer from the 40-50 workhorses living underground in the mine.

Watch the video above to get the full story on the underground garden from The Weather Network reporter Nathan Coleman.

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