Ontario: Hold on to your treats, wicked storm threatens heavy rain, snow

Digital Writers
Ontario: Hold on to your treats, wicked storm threatens heavy rain, snow

The timing of this next potent system in Ontario couldn&apost get any worse for trick-or-treaters as heavy rain, strong winds and even snow threaten to make for an especially spooky Halloween night. The impact from this moisture packed system will begin to make its mark late Wednesday, with a widespread soaking rain picking up through the day on Thursday. More on the timing of this system and how parts of the north will be trading umbrellas for snow shovels, below.

WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS

  • Classic fall storm takes aim for Halloween, soaking rain in the south and heavy snow in the north

  • Strong cold front with damaging wind gusts expected on Friday

  • Chilly weekend weather and bands of lake-effect snow north of the GTA into Sunday

  • Stay up-to-date on the ALERTS in your area

WATCH BELOW: TRACKING THE NEXT SYSTEM THAT THREATENS HALLOWEEN

After being spoiled by temperatures more typical of mid-September to start the week, conditions are deteriorating -- and quickly -- across Ontario. This of course means that the timing of this storm will poorly align with any Halloween festivities on Thursday.

A moisture laden system over the lower Mississippi Valley is on a track north into Ontario, with impact expected to last right through Friday. The frontal boundary of the storm has already begun to bring rain showers to southern regions, ahead of a widespread soaking rain that spreads through much of Halloween.

SERIOUS SOAKER OF A SYSTEM, RISK OF LOCALIZED FLOODING

"The rain will be heavy at times with rumbles of thunder possible during Thursday afternoon and early evening as totals reach 30 to 60 mm across our region," says Weather Network meteorologist Dr. Doug Gillham.

While a break from the rain is expected later Thursday evening, at this point it looks like the break will come after trick-or-treat times.

ONRain (14)

With the ground still moist from last weekend&aposs heavy flooding rain, this latest soggy blast could result in more localized flooding. Lake levels are also much higher than normal for this time of year with strong winds and high waves threatening shoreline flooding in some local communities.

ONTrickorTreating

As the bulk of the rain winds down through early Friday, some wrap around showers are possible along with a wet snow.

"No accumulation is expected across most of southern Ontario, but we could see a coating of wet snow across the higher elevations north and west of the Greater Toronto Area, including Orangeville and the Kitchener and Waterloo region," Gillham says.

Bands of lake-effect snow are also likely in the traditional snowbelts later Saturday and through Sunday.

SEE ALSO: Canada&aposs got some freaky fall frost stats

SIGNIFICANT SNOWFALL IN THE NORTH, TRAVEL NOT RECOMMENDED

Trade the umbrellas for winter boots and snow shovels for parts of the north, as the incoming system will manifest as a major winter-like storm.

A rain and snow mix will push into parts of northeastern Ontario on Thursday as temperatures drop below the freezing mark and the precipitation transitions into straight snow.

ONSnowLR

"Major impacts on travel are likely along the Trans-Canada Highway with snow totals of 10-20 cm likely combined with extensive blowing and drifting snow," Gillham warns.

Environment Canada has issued special weather statements across the Sudbury and North Bay regions, urging drivers to consider postponing non-essential travel as the storm blows through.

TAKE DOWN THE HALLOWEEN DECOR BEFORE FRIDAY&aposS BIG WINDS

As the rain and snow gradually taper through Friday, wind gusts between 60-90 km/h are possible as a strong cold front cuts through southern Ontario.

The strongest winds are expected late Thursday and into Friday with gusts possibly reaching as high as 100 km/h for the Niagara region and shoreline areas in eastern parts of the province including Prince Edward County by Friday afternoon

ONWind (1)

Colder than average temperatures will lock in for at least the first week of November, with a threat for more lake-effect snow once again in the traditional snowbelts.

GREAT LAKES: FIVE METRE WAVES COMING