Ontario storm threatens biggest snowfall of the year so far for many

Ontario storm threatens biggest snowfall of the year so far for many
Ontario storm threatens biggest snowfall of the year so far for many

An active storm track along the jet stream is set to swing and park itself over or just south of the Great Lakes through the final days of January, bringing multiple systems and several chances for snow in southern Ontario through this week.

READ MORE: It's not one season fits all: How winter weather varies across Canada

After our light Sunday snowfall, other events will build through the week in southern Ontario. This includes the potential for significant snowfall in the region mid-week, with previous, similar storm tracks resulting in 10-20 cm of snow in the hardest-hit areas.

While the long-range forecast always comes with some level of uncertainty, here is a look at what we know so far when it comes to snow in southern Ontario. Exact snowfall amounts will become available as the forecast becomes more clear.

ONCONFIDENCE
ONCONFIDENCE

Potential significant snowfall with mid-week system

A possible clipper will bring light snowfall into eastern Ontario and parts of the GTA Monday overnight into Tuesday morning.

This is just the tip of the iceberg for what's to come.

A larger storm -- a Texas low -- will take aim at the region towards the middle of the week. A moisture-laden system, starting stateside in the Deep South, will continue trek towards southern Ontario and Eastern Canada.

ONSTORMTOWATCH
ONSTORMTOWATCH

Due to its origins, this system will usher in much more moisture with it, along with energy from a trough that is also coming in with colder air to boost potential snowfall totals.

Snow will begin to build across extreme southwestern Ontario later Wednesday morning, before filling in across the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) later in the afternoon. Snowfall rates will pickup in intensity in the evening, potentially as much as 2 cm an hour, likely to cause havoc on the roadways for the commute.

Motorists will be wise to plan ahead and allow for extra time on the roads or postpone non-essential travel as delays are likely.

ONTIMEWED
ONTIMEWED

While we are still several days out, but storms in the past that have taken similar tracks often leave a swath of 10-20 cm of snowfall across the hardest-hit regions.

The track of this system will need to be monitored due to the warmer air associated with it. A farther north track could result in some of the snow transitioning to ice or even rain.

ONQCSNOW
ONQCSNOW

This system will wrap up west to east on Thursday morning, but roads will likely still be poor shape across many areas.

Looking ahead

While fairly far out, long-range forecast models are all hinting at the likelihood of some western clippers that could slide across Ontario in the final weekend of January.

Snowfall totals are highly uncertain, but we do know clippers typically bring a quick burst of snow as they slip through an area, given their usual lack of moisture.

SEE ALSO: La Niña fades, so what does that mean for a Canadian spring?

Due to the common uncertainty in long-range forecasts, these details are subject to change and only provide an early glance at what is possible ahead in the weather pattern.

Check back in with The Weather Network for updates on the forecast for Ontario.