P.E.I. film released to worldwide audience

·2 min read
P.E.I. filmmaker Susan Rodgers says she's disappointed she wasn't able to experience the red carpet at film festivals due to COVID-19, but is happy with the positive reviews. (Submitted by Susan Rodgers  - image credit)
P.E.I. filmmaker Susan Rodgers says she's disappointed she wasn't able to experience the red carpet at film festivals due to COVID-19, but is happy with the positive reviews. (Submitted by Susan Rodgers - image credit)

She may not have been able to wear the fancy dress and walk the red carpet, but Summerside filmmaker Susan Rodgers is thrilled to see her first feature film distributed to a worldwide audience.

Still the Water was released at film festivals in the fall of 2020 within the limits of COVID-19 restrictions. The Whistler Film Festival selected it to compete for the award for best Canadian feature.

On Tuesday, the film is being sent out to Canada and the U.S., with a staggered release elsewhere.

"We're looking at platforms like Amazon and eventually Google Play, I guess, and iTunes," Rodgers said in an interview with Mainstreet P.E.I. host Matt Rainnie.

It's all just fun now. It's all just about having a good time and just being pleased with what we've done with the film that we've made. — Susan Rodgers

"Just to see my film up on Amazon is pretty cool."

Rodgers is planning an online launch through the Still the Water Facebook page Tuesday at 8 p.m.

"It's all just fun now. It's all just about having a good time and just being pleased with what we've done with the film that we've made."

Still the Water is about brothers and a family trying to reconnect many years after the loss of the mother through a domestic tragedy.

"It's ultimately a story of healing and forgiveness," Rodgers said.

The film was completed in 2019, but due to COVID-19 they couldn't celebrate quite the way they hoped when film-festival season rolled around last year.

"There were sad moments because I really, myself and also the team, you know, the cast and the other producers, we wanted to experience that red carpet, first-film-ever-at-a-film-festival experience. You know, wear the fancy dress and the makeup and get the hair done. And, you know, we didn't get to do any of that. And that was really hard."

Rodgers said she has learned to roll with it, and the positive reviews for the film have helped make it "a fun ride."

"You really can exhale when people who you don't know are weighing in on your film and talking about it. So that's been an overwhelmingly positive experience, thankfully."

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