P.E.I. lieutenant-governor formally proclaims Charles as King of Canada

·1 min read
King Charles delivers an address to the nation and the Commonwealth in London following the death of Queen Elizabeth. (Yui Mok - WPA Pool/Getty Images - image credit)
King Charles delivers an address to the nation and the Commonwealth in London following the death of Queen Elizabeth. (Yui Mok - WPA Pool/Getty Images - image credit)

A 21-gun salute was fired at Victoria Park in Charlottetown on Monday morning in honour of King Charles.

Members of the Prince Edward Island Regiment fired using blanks, with puffs of smoke accompanying each report.

The salute came after a formal proclamation of Charles' accession to the throne was made at Government House by Lt.-Gov. Antoinette Perry.

Members of the P.E.I. government, Mi'kmaw chiefs and other senior officials were in attendance.

Shane Hennessey/CBC
Shane Hennessey/CBC

This ceremony followed a tradition dating back to the accession of King George III in 1760. The King's Privy Council for Canada in Ottawa held a similar event, as did Perry's counterparts in other provinces.

The Prince Edward Island Regiment is an army reserve unit based in Charlottetown and Summerside, whose lineage dates back to 1875.

Queen Elizabeth died Thursday at the age of 96 after ruling for more than 70 years.

Shane Hennessey/CBC
Shane Hennessey/CBC

As a sign of mourning, historic Fanningbank, the residence of P.E.I.'s lieutenant-governor, will be lit up in blue from dusk till dawn until Sept. 19.

That is the day of the Queen's funeral, after her coffin lies in state for public viewing at the Houses of Parliament Palace for six days.

Prince Edward Islanders can pay tribute to the Queen by signing the books of condolence at Government House, the legislative assembly, or at provincial libraries in Souris, Montague, Summerside and Tignish.