Pack up the shack, province tells ice fishermen

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Pack up the shack, province tells ice fishermen

Ice fishermen in New Brunswick were busy removing their shacks from provincial waterways on Sunday.

The provincial government has set March 13 as the date the shelters must be removed from waterways in southern New Brunswick. Fishermen in northern New Brunswick have until March 20.

Sam Buote was at the Renforth Wharf in Rothesay on Sunday removing his ice shack. But he said he wished he had done it last week when the weather was warmer.

"It's cold out here," he said.

Risk to waterways

The Environment Department is reminding the fishermen that failing to remove the shelters by the specified dates can pose a risk to the waterways.

"By removing their shelters before our waterways thaw, they will help the protection of our environment and ensure this fishing tradition continues to be enjoyed by many generations to come," Environment Minister Serge Rousselle said in a news release.

He is also asking ice-fishermen not to leave any debris behind, and to report any infractions of environmental regulations.

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