PC Party president steps down, hints at bid for leadership

·1 min read
Eugene Manning is now a former president of the PC Party after resigning Monday. (Eugene Manning/Twitter - image credit)
Eugene Manning is now a former president of the PC Party after resigning Monday. (Eugene Manning/Twitter - image credit)

Less than a week after former Progressive Conservative Leader Ches Crosbie announced his resignation, the party's president is following suit, stepping down from the role while hinting he could make a bid for Crosbie's old job.

Eugene Manning said in a letter to executive party members Monday that he feared contravening the Tory constitution's neutrality condition that governs the president.

"As you know, I have strong views regarding the potential direction of our Party, and our province's future," he wrote. "As such, there is an exceptionally low probability that I will remain neutral through the leadership contest as I consider my own future, including whether I will stand as candidate for leader or, in the alternative, support another candidate for this role."

He went on to call the decision the "prudent course of action" to protect the executive's impartiality.

Manning is the first to publicly suggest running for the position after Crosbie left the job Wednesday, following his second defeat in a general election.

David Brazil, MHA for Conception Bay East-Bell Island, is now interim opposition leader, but has said he's not interested in vying for a permanent spot at the helm.

On Wednesday, Manning devoted a Twitter thread to Crosbie's accomplishments as elected Tory head, noting his success in growing the party's membership and representation across the province.

Manning has declined a request for comment.

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