A peek inside the construction of new Tyne Valley rink

·2 min read
A construction worker levels up his work inside the new Tyne Valley rink. (Brian Higgins/CBC - image credit)
A construction worker levels up his work inside the new Tyne Valley rink. (Brian Higgins/CBC - image credit)

Work is progressing on the interior of the new rink in Tyne Valley, P.E.I., and the community hopes to have it open in time for the annual oyster festival this summer.

The old rink burned down in December 2019. The destruction was so complete that officials could not determine the cause.

Following the fire, there was a massive community push to have the rink funded through the Kraft Hockeyville contest. The community fell short of nabbing the grand prize, but did end up with $25,000 for runner-up.

The federal, provincial and local governments are partnering to fund the rest of the $10.3-million project. Ottawa is chipping in $3.9 million, the province is putting up $3.3 million and the municipally is contributing $3.1 million.

Things are shaping up inside the new Tyne Valley Rink.
Things are shaping up inside the new Tyne Valley Rink.(Brian Higgins/CBC)

The new rink is beginning to take shape. The steel girders and curved roof went up last fall, and were closed in this winter.

Welders have been busy. Metal frames line one wall where the stands will be located.

Carpenters are roughing in the outline of what will be an official NHL-size rink, 200 feet long and 85 feet wide.

"It feels pretty good to be a part of something," said bricklayer Grant MacKinnon. "We're doing what we can to help out … and it's just nice to be a part of it."

The boards have been roughed in for the NHL-size rink.
The boards have been roughed in for the NHL-size rink.(Brian Higgins/CBC)

The community is continuing to raise funds. The community is hoping to host the annual Tyne Valley Oyster Festival this summer.

"We are keeping our fingers crossed for August this year," said Tyne Valley Mayor Jeff Noye.

"We love our oyster festival and that's always a big thing. For the rink, [it's] a big fundraiser every year, and if we're ever allowed to have one, we know it's going to be a great one."

Crews expect to be pouring concrete for the rink pad by July, with hopes that the first hockey games can be played in the fall.

Plans were still on paper last August.
Plans were still on paper last August.(John Robertson/CBC)

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