'People die every day': Syrian refugee in Saskatoon reflects on chemical attacks

'People die every day': Syrian refugee in Saskatoon reflects on chemical attacks

Her former home in Homs is far from Saskatchewan, and far from what it used to be.

When Rana Mustafa first arrived in Saskatoon in February of 2016, she and her two children had already experienced years of bombings, war and uncertainty.

She tries to keep her two children up to date with what's going on in Syria, but finds it's often hard for them to listen or to talk about it.

"It's so hard. They can't imagine. We lived five years within the war there, so it's too hard for us to talk again," Mustafa explained.

Hearing that a chemical attack had killed more than 80 people earlier this week was not surprising to her.

She said during her time in Syria, things like that became routine. 

"It's always the same story. People die every day by different ways, but they die every day," said Mustafa.

While living in Homs, her home and the school her children went to was bombed. The growing danger led her to move her children away from the city.

Mustafa's husband and the rest of her family are still in Syria. They try to keep in touch but she says it can be very challenging to get in touch with them.

In the wake of the chemical attack, Mustafa said she does not see peace coming anytime soon to the region.