Philip Pynn, facing 4 breaches of conditions, has case set over to May

·3 min read
Philip Pynn, pictured here while on statutory release in January 2019, is back on the court docket again after police say he violated recognizance orders while in Newfoundland and Labrador. (Ariana Kelland/CBC - image credit)
Philip Pynn, pictured here while on statutory release in January 2019, is back on the court docket again after police say he violated recognizance orders while in Newfoundland and Labrador. (Ariana Kelland/CBC - image credit)
Philip Pynn, pictured here while on statutory release in January 2019, is back on the court docket again after police say he violated recognizance orders while in Newfoundland and Labrador.
Philip Pynn, pictured here while on statutory release in January 2019, is back on the court docket again after police say he violated recognizance orders while in Newfoundland and Labrador.(Ariana Kelland/CBC)

Convicted killer Philip Pynn did not appear in St. John's provincial court Wednesday, though the mere utterance of his name had people craning their necks to see if he was coming through the double doors of a crowded Courtroom 7.

There were 50 names on the docket Wednesday morning, though none more well-known than the 35-year-old Pynn.

He's charged with four counts of failing to abide by recognizance conditions. Pynn has been ordered to "keep the peace" and stay away from known criminals, aside from those in his own family.

Fresh off completing his first federal sentence, Pynn landed back in St. John's before the New Year. His arrival came at the behest of the local police, who told the parole board they were concerned his connections in prison and risk of retaliation for previous crimes would bring trouble to the city.

Pynn's stay in St. John's didn't stay quiet for long. A warrant was soon issued for his arrest on four breaches of his conditions. He turned himself into police on March 10, and was released from custody the following day.

While he did not appear in court on Wednesday, Pynn was represented by lawyer, Mark Gruchy, who represented Pynn in his manslaughter trial in 2014.

Philip Pynn was represented by Mark Gruchy at his trial for the killing of Nick Winsor. He was found guilty of manslaughter in 2014.
Philip Pynn was represented by Mark Gruchy at his trial for the killing of Nick Winsor. He was found guilty of manslaughter in 2014.(CBC)

Accounting for time served, Pynn was sentenced to five years, seven months and 10 days for killing his friend, Nick Winsor, in a robbery gone wrong.

Both men went to a home on Portugal Cove Road with a loaded shotgun tucked into Winsor's pants. Pynn took hold of the gun, aimed it at the homeowner, and a struggle ensued. A single shot was fired, killing Winsor instantly.

Sentence served in 2 other provinces

Pynn — who has more than 100 convictions in Newfoundland and Labrador — went away to serve his sentence in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. He was a problem inmate in both prisons, according to his parole documents, but was released in 2019 after serving two-thirds of his sentence.

His release was cut short after two months living at a halfway house in Nova Scotia. The parole board said "an incident" with a woman at a hotel led to the police being called, and a drug test prior to the incident showed Pynn tested positive for morphine.

WATCH | See Killing Time, a documentary on Philip Pynn that aired in 2020:

He was sent back inside, where he stayed without any further issues until his second release in 2020. While he was initially not allowed to live in Newfoundland and Labrador, police told VOCM he was no longer bound by those conditions when he came home to St. John's.

Gruchy told the judge on Wednesday that he had time to review most of the information related to the current charges, and that he would speak with Pynn to talk about next steps.

The matter is due back in court on May 19.

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