Phillip Schofield makes dig at Claudia Winkleman's make-up range on This Morning

Albertina Lloyd
Entertainment reporter, Yahoo UK

Phillip Schofield made a catty dig at Claudia Winkleman on This Morning, claiming if he saw her make-up in a shop, “I wouldn’t know who Claudia was”.

Beauty presenter Sarah Jossel was talking hosts Schofield and Holly Willoughby through her top picks from celebrity make-up ranges when she showed them “Full Panda by Claudia”, as a way for viewers to recreate the Strictly Come Dancing presenter’s signature black eyeliner.

Schofield frowned: “It’s funny though because unless you knew what you were looking for, if you saw that in the shop, you wouldn’t know it was Claudia Winkleman...

“Full Panda by Claudia - I wouldn’t know who Claudia was!”

He then made a dismissive hand gesture.

Phillip Schofield said he wouldn't know which Claudia they were taling about (Credit: ITV)

Winkleman - who has co-presented BBC dance show Strictly with Tess Daly since 2012 - is the highest paid woman at the BBC earning between £450,000–499,999 per year, according to figures released earlier this year.

Read more: Claudia Winkleman on future Strictly exit

She is well known for her dusky eyed make-up look and heavy fringe.

Schofield, 57, and Winkleman, 47, worked together in 1997 on ITV gameshow Talking Telephone Numbers.

Claudia Winkleman's panda eyes are her sinature look (Credit: Getty Images for Centrepoint)

Schofield once recalled how they both narrowly escaped death on the show when they were almost struck on the heads by falling set pieces during rehearsal.

He revealed to Willoughby during a live episode of This Morning in 2016: “We were standing a bit further apart than you would normally do in a rehearsal and we were just chatting away reading through the lines and stuff.

Claudia Winkleman and Phillip Schofield hosted Talking Telephone Numbers together in 1997 (Credit: ITV)

And at one point in the show there was a big drop box up in the roof of the studio which was going to open up and drop confetti.

Read more: Amanda Holden makes another dig at Phillip Schofield

“We got to that bit in the script, and somebody pressed the button and opened the drop box which was right up in the roof but was full of chains and winch gear, and as the drop box opened all of the chains and the winches and the big pulley dropped between us.

“You felt the draught as it went through. It chipped the floor, the studio floor is still chipped. And that was our lucky day, Claudia Winkleman and I.”

  • Grandson of Elvis Presley has died at age 27, agent says
    Celebrity
    The Canadian Press

    Grandson of Elvis Presley has died at age 27, agent says

    LOS ANGELES — The son of Lisa Marie Presley has died. He was 27.Presley’s representative Roger Widynowski said in a statement Sunday to The Associated Press that she was “heartbroken” after learning about the death of her son Benjamin Keough. He is the grandson of the late Elvis Presley.TMZ reports that Keough died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound Sunday in Calabasas, California.“She is completely heartbroken, inconsolable and beyond devastated but trying to stay strong for her 11-year-old twins and her oldest daughter Riley,” Widynowski said in the statement. “She adored that boy. He was the love of her life.”Presley had Keough and actress Riley Keough, 31, with her former husband Danny Keough. She also had twins from another marriage.Nancy Sinatra tweeted her condolences to Presley, writing, “I have known you since before your mama gave birth to you, never dreaming you would have pain like this in your life. I’m so very sorry.”The Associated Press

  • Cabin owner warns about 'silent killer' after carbon monoxide close call
    Lifestyle
    CBC

    Cabin owner warns about 'silent killer' after carbon monoxide close call

    When Hilda Senior woke up at her cabin on Saturday morning, she knew something wasn't right. "I remember waking and thinking, why is my heart beating so loud in my ears?"Senior and her husband Albert had arrived at their cabin on an isolated island in Placentia Bay late the night before. They were in a bit of a rush when they arrived, she said, and went to bed around midnight.At 8 a.m. the next day, she felt ill."It felt like someone had doused me with a bucket of water. I couldn't move. At one point I did sit, but I felt like everything went black and I thought I was going to faint, so I lay back on the bed," she said.> He shouted at me to get up but I couldn't get off the bed, I felt like rubber. \- Hilda SeniorSenior weakly called out to her husband, who had gotten up a bit earlier and was outside having a cup of coffee. "He said when he looked at me, he thought [it was a] heart attack, so he shouted at me to get up but I couldn't get off the bed, I felt like rubber," she said."He managed to get me to the kitchen, which was only like 10 feet away from the bed, he put me on a chair and I remember seeing him on the floor … nothing seemed real."Senior said she's not sure how long Albert was on the floor, but he was able to get himself up, get them both outside and call their daughter, who was about 15 minutes away by boat in Red Harbour.It was when he went back into the cabin to get their dog out that he realized what the problem was."He turned off the propane and that's when he figured that it was carbon monoxide. We have a propane fridge and stove in the cabin."'I was pretty close to not coming back'Senior's daughter called 911 to have ambulances meet them in Red Harbour, while a family friend came out to the cabin to bring them back by boat."Luckily, it was a beautiful day on the water — no wind, no waves, so we were able to go faster than normal," she said.Senior said the ambulance took her to the hospital, where doctors treated her for carbon monoxide poisoning."They told me I was pretty close to not coming back. The doctor in Burin told me that I must have had someone looking out for me."Now, a week later, Senior said she still struggles with her breathing at times and has recurring headaches. She said her doctor believes she has some muscle damage in her heart and some "stroke-like symptoms" because of the lack of oxygen.Senior said they usually sleep with a window open and bring a carbon monoxide detector to their cabin, but that night was damp and the window was closed, and they'd forgotten the carbon monoxide detector at home. A problem with the propane fridge caused the build up of carbon monoxide, she said, and they've already gone back to the cabin to get rid of it. The Seniors are now investing in solar panels and an electric refrigerator.And she has a warning for anyone in a similar situation."If you have an older fridge, keep a window open, don't forget your carbon monoxide detector … we've heard of other incidents on the news or whatever, but no, I never thought it would be this serious or that it could be so sneaky," she said."We know now why it's called the silent killer."Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

  • Over 600,000 Hong Kongers cast 'protest' vote against new security laws
    News
    Reuters

    Over 600,000 Hong Kongers cast 'protest' vote against new security laws

    Hong Kong's opposition camp said on Sunday that over 600,000 citizens in the Chinese-ruled city cast ballots over the weekend in primaries it cast as a symbolic protest vote against tough national security laws imposed by Beijing. The unofficial poll will decide the strongest pro-democracy candidates to contest elections in September to Hong Kong's Legislative Council. Then, they aim to seize majority control for the first time from pro-Beijing rivals by riding a wave of anti-China sentiment stirred by the law, which critics say has gravely undermined Hong Kong's freedoms.

  • Young female-staffed business could be out of luck if Mahone Bay bylaws change
    Business
    CBC

    Young female-staffed business could be out of luck if Mahone Bay bylaws change

    More than a dozen teenage girls in Mahone Bay may be out of work soon if the town moves forward with changes to their bylaws.All of the girls will be in high school next year and they say they've been getting an excellent business education by operating the Seaside Creamery."It's just been nice to learn about everything like how to handle money and how to talk to customers," said Taylor Johnson. "We know them by first-name basis and the locals are really good to us."The business was opened last summer by Mark Lowe as an ice cream shop on Edgewater Street.The business has expanded their menu and now offers donuts, hot dogs, hamburgers and lobster rolls.But it recently hit its first snag. The town of Mahone Bay is looking to change its temporary vending bylaws.The proposed change would mean the creamery would only be allowed to be open one week per month unless it moved to another location."I essentially would have to shut down the creamery," said Lowe. "The kids would be thrown out of work, which I don't think is fair."Zoning issuesThe business is set up on Lowe's waterfront property and is not zoned commercial.The town says it's in the "open shoreline" zone, where no structure can be any higher than five feet in order to preserve the view plane of the harbour and the town's iconic three churches, one of the most photographed sights in Nova Scotia."The problem comes back to the notion of having zoning on properties in the town and protecting what council sees as the best interest of the entire town and not just one individual," said Mahone Bay Mayor David Devenne, who said there may be options that could save the shop from having to move."There is a possibility for rezoning, or a variance or a development agreement."The budding entrepreneurs say they're learning how to provide the best service for their customers, and the idea of having their business shut down to just one week a month would ruin their summer plans."It's pretty upsetting to hear about it," said Marjanah Kalau. "It's a really good experience to work here, we're learning a lot and everyone seems to like it."How the zoning issue will play out could come to a head at this week's town council session.Council will meet Tuesday night and it will be decided then if further bylaw revisions are required.Lowe says if the town changes the bylaws, they will be forced to move their business out of town. But that's not what he wants to see happen."We live in Mahone Bay, we love Mahone Bay," said Lowe. "But if push comes to shove, I can't have a viable business for the students for one week per month."MORE TOP STORIES

  • Bay St. George RCMP searching for serial predator on the run
    News
    CBC

    Bay St. George RCMP searching for serial predator on the run

    Bay St. George RCMP are asking for the public's help in locating a serial predator.According to the RCMP, Matthew Francis O'Quinn, 44, is unlawfully at large after failing to comply with a long-term supervision order issued in 2015.Police say they have received information that he is currently in the Bay St. George area.O'Quinn was found guilty of forcible confinement and uttering death threats in 2012. He was also labelled a long-term offender in 2015."Mr. O'Quinn is a habitual offender who constitutes a significant and ongoing danger to the public and to women in particular," Judge Wayne Gorman said in his decision at the time.O'Quinn's criminal record then included more than 40 prior convictions for various crimes, including a history of violence against women.Police are asking anyone who has information on O'Quinn's location to contact Bay St. George RCMP or Crime Stoppers.Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

  • Lebanese Christian cleric seen to criticize  Hezbollah, allies over crisis
    News
    Reuters

    Lebanese Christian cleric seen to criticize Hezbollah, allies over crisis

    Lebanon's top Christian cleric stepped up criticism of the Iran-backed Shi'ite group Hezbollah and its allies without naming them on Sunday, saying Lebanese rejected being isolated from their allies and driven into decline. Lebanon is suffering a financial meltdown which marks the biggest threat to its stability since the 1975-90 civil war. For the second sermon in a row, Maronite Patriarch Bechara Boutros Al-Rai stressed the importance of Lebanon's neutrality, implicit criticism of the heavily armed Hezbollah over its support for Iran in conflicts with Sunni-led Gulf Arab states.

  • 'The most American thing ever': Video of Calgary man rescuing baby bald eagle from lake goes viral
    News
    CBC

    'The most American thing ever': Video of Calgary man rescuing baby bald eagle from lake goes viral

    Calgary resident Brett Bacon, along with partner Lindsay and his newborn child, were speeding down Lake Windermere in British Columbia on July 4 when they spotted something odd in the water.As the boat drew closer, Bacon realized there was a large bird floating in the water with its wings spread — a young bald eagle."As we got closer, he tried to fly away and he just couldn't get out of the water at all," Bacon said. "So at that point, I just realized that he was in a bit of trouble."Lindsay started recording, and caught what happened next on video.WATCH | Brett Bacon rescues young bald eagle from Lake Windermere on July 4:Bacon brought the boat close to the eagle and, after a failed attempt, succeeded in pulling it out of the water."I got him into the boat, and that time I held onto him," Bacon said. "He fully held onto me and sunk his talons through my jacket sleeves and into my arms. So that was really enjoyable to feel that."Bacon and Lindsay cruised about a kilometre back to shore. There, they let the eagle free. "He just kinda stood there shivering and hopefully warming up a bit," Bacon said. Video goes viralSoon, video of the rescue was picked up by a popular Instagram account, and soon was followed by outlets like TMZ,  The New York Post and Fox News, with some comments referring to the July 4 episode as "the most American thing ever.""I woke up on my birthday and the whole thing was going crazy," Bacon said. "My mom said it best — the reason it blew up, was because it had nothing to do with the world, nothing to do with COVID-19 … it's just a guy saving an animal, and glad to be part of it."Bacon said he soon heard from wildlife officials about what would come next for the young eagle."He did get picked up by wildlife officials, they're going to be bringing him back, taking him somewhere outside Windermere and setting him free again," Bacon said.

  • Furniture stores have no shortage of customers. The same can't be said for the appliances
    Lifestyle
    CBC

    Furniture stores have no shortage of customers. The same can't be said for the appliances

    With their supply chain interrupted by the pandemic — and an unusually large number of customers eager to open their wallets for things like freezers, washers and driers — furniture stores in the St. John's area are struggling to keep up."People are coming in. We have lineups at the store. It's been great," said Dan Mercer, appliance manager at Atlantic Home Furnishings in Mount Pearl.But while there's no shortage of customers — many of them turning their attention to their homes as the COVID-19 pandemic wears on — the same can't be said for appliances."I've got containers of product on order of the basic products; I don't know when I'm going to see it. There's no ETA on it," added Mercer."The supply and demand chain has actually switched. There's more demand for product than it is supply."That's bad news for people like Maxine Tucker, a decorator for the annual dream home lottery organized by the N.L. chapter of the Canadian Hard of Hearing Association.She's decorated two dozen dream homes over the years, spending about $40,000 each time on everything from rugs and lamps to ovens to bedroom and living room suites. Every product that goes into the dream home is of the best quality.But her visit to Cohen's Home Furnishings in St. John's on Friday was an exercise in frustration."Usually we come in and the product is available immediately. Now there's quite a wait," she said."Right now we are very limited to the amount of stock that's here. We're very limited to the appliances."The dream home has to be ready for this fall, when tickets go on sale, and Tucker is crossing her fingers that she'll accomplish her mission."Hopefully we'll meet our goal. If not I'm in trouble. The appliance people are really going out of their way to get us the product that we need. If not they're substituting."Factories slowing ramping up productionIt's a perfect storm for those in the furniture and flooring business.Beginning in March, the pandemic forced the closure of factories throughout the world, and most furniture stores in this province either closed their doors completely, or scrambled to offer online services and things like curbside pick-up.At around the same time, there was an unprecedented run on items like freezers as people began stocking up on food supplies, and washers and driers became hot commodities because of the increased emphasis on sanitization in this new era of COVID-19.With public health measures slowly being relaxed, the industry is slowly coming back online, but things are far from normal."It's been difficult obtaining inventory from our suppliers," said Kim Dwyer, who sources appliances, electronics and flooring for Cohen's, which operates 13 stores throughout the province.With shoppers eager to part with their money after months of being asked to shelter in their homes, appliance specialists like Mercer and Dwyer can only shake their heads at the unprecedented scenario."We've been extremely busy," said Dwyer."I think what's happened is that customers are at home more so they're wanting to change things at home like furnishings and appliances and flooring, so we've had an influx of people interested in purchasing new things for their home."'I haven't seen anything like it before'"I haven't seen anything like it before," added Mercer, who's been in the furniture sales business for 25 years.Mercer took receipt of eight new upright freezers on Thursday. What's unique about that? Well they were ordered in April. And they were all gone by Friday afternoon."It's the same with washers. I had a shipment in (Wednesday). They'll be gone by the end of the weekend. It's impossible to get the product," he said.With shipments from factories throughout North America and around the world gradually increasing, the situation is slowly improving. But anyone looking to purchase a new freezer to preserve their fall berries or codfish from the recreational fishery may be out of luck. Those looking for that special model of washer and drier may have to lower their expectations and go with another option.That's because wait times that used to be four to six weeks have now grown to eight to 12 weeks. For for those really special orders, it could take months before it arrives.Thankfully, prices have remained stable, said Erika Barrow-Barmak, who buys furniture and bedding for Cohen's."We don't know exactly what is going to come down the pike, especially as maybe some supplies are harder to source and find. But as of right now we are very lucky that we have not had to absorb any extra costs and pass that on to the customer," said Barrow-Barmak.Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

  • Canada adds health officials at U.S. border crossings to screen for COVID-19
    Health
    CBC

    Canada adds health officials at U.S. border crossings to screen for COVID-19

    As the volume of travellers entering Canada through the U.S. has increased in recent weeks, public health officials are being placed at land borders to bolster screening for COVID-19.The Public Health Agency of Canada is adding on-site employees at 36 points of entry, including New Brunswick crossings in St. Stephen, Woodstock and Edmundston.Tammy Jarbeau, a Health Canada spokesperson, said the "increased presence" of officials is at the points of entry — including air and land — that see 90 per cent of travellers. "PHAC officials, including quarantine officers, clinical screening officers and screening officers will be on-site to screen travellers entering Canada at these ports of entry," she said.The news follows a surge in new cases of COVID-19 in the U.S., with large daily increases in some of the country's most populous states. That uptick is paired with an increase in traffic across the international border at airports and land crossings, as restrictions are loosened.Travel across the border has been linked to a new cluster of cases in Prince Edward Island tied to an individual who came from the U.S. with a student visa. Colin Furness, an infection control epidemiologist and associate professor at the University of Toronto, said medical screening for the virus falls outside the job of Canadian Border Service Agency officers."That's a problem," he said. "We just assume that we can just charge the customs and immigration folks with essentially doing public health work."Furness said he believes the health officials will be used for secondary screening if there is an issue, which could be a question that creates cause for concern. He thinks the decision might have been prompted by the recent increase in cross-border travel.Land crossings nearly doubleTraffic between the U.S. and Canada has dropped since the border closed to non-essential travel on March 21. But recent exemptions have allowed for traffic to enter, including immediate family members, who are required to quarantine and stay in the country for a minimum of 15 days.  Cross-border travel is also permitted for work and study, medical care, health reasons and to maintain the flow of goods and services for essential supply chains. Two government orders currently restrict travel into Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic. The first blocks entry to foreign nationals except for certain circumstances, while the second closes the U.S.-Canada land border to non-essential travel until July 21.The volume of people crossing the land border has increased since restrictions began in March, from about 115,000 a week from late April to early May to 175,000 a week in late June. Those figures include commercial and non-commercial traffic. The number of non-commercial highway travellers entering Canada has nearly doubled over that time period, going from about 3,300 a week to about 6,500.It's unclear how much of that traffic entered New Brunswick, as the CBSA would not provide statistics for specific ports of entry or provinces, citing security reasons. Secondary health screeningMark Stuart, an agency spokesperson, said officers ask all travellers about their purpose of visit and state of their health and look for visible signs of illness."CBSA officers remain vigilant and are highly trained to identify travellers seeking entry into Canada who may pose a health and safety risk," he said.Officers will refer any traveller suspected of being ill to a Public Health Agency staff member for further assessment, regardless of how they responded to questions. They also consider if a person is able to properly self isolate or quarantine. The health agency said all ports of entry, including land borders, always have access to quarantine officers through a tele-health system. Only the 36 high-traffic sites will have that staff onsite. All travellers entering Canada are required to isolate if they have symptoms or quarantine for 14 days without signs of the virus. International arrivals must also complete a contact-tracing form and provide information to allow for physical checks that they are following isolation rules. 'People want it shutdown'St. Stephen Mayor Allan MacEachern said he believes residents in his border community will feel safer with the new measures. "People knowing that is put in place, how people will try to bend the rules and try to sneak through even though they could be arrested, you don't know — they won't take that chance now," he said. The mayor said his town is in a "tough situation" with the shutdown with families divided and daily life disrupted. St. Stephen also relies on a steady flow of American tourists at its businesses. Despite close ties with neighbouring Calais, Me., fears over COVID-19 are prompting calls for the closure to continue."Walking on the street or reading comments on Facebook, you can definitely see people want it shut down, they really do want it shut down," MacEachern saidTravel restrictions helpingFurness said travel restrictions — despite some flare-ups — have been largely effective at preventing the spread of the virus from the U.S. and internationally. But the risk remains."It doesn't take that many people to cause a lot of COVID," he said. "I mean one person can spark a whole outbreak."In February and March, CBSA officials began asking screening questions and taking temperatures sporadically.Those measures do little to catch asymptomatic individuals. Furness said he'd like to see the use of pulse oximeters, a device that checks how much oxygen is dissolved in blood. That level could indicate decreased lung capacity and the possibility of having COVID-19. The infection control epidemiologist said the key measure of how well governments are managing the crisis is looking at the response when a case gets through. "The one thing to be afraid of is someone presents at the hospital, they've got COVID, and they have no idea how they got it," he said. "That's what's scary."

  • Saskatoon police pleas for patience in Evan Penner arrest case 'contradictory,' say critics
    News
    CBC

    Saskatoon police pleas for patience in Evan Penner arrest case 'contradictory,' say critics

    Saskatoon police are asking the public not to rush to judgment about the arrest of Evan Penner, but critics say it appears police have already made up their minds.University of Regina associate professor Michelle Stewart, Penner's lawyer Eleanore Sunchild and others say police are being hypocritical. Police have been pleading for patience while publicly releasing selective, biased details about Penner, she said."It does appear to be contradictory to tell people to be patient, and then slowly enter in bits and pieces of information," Stewart said. "People are still looking for a form of accountability in policing that we simply don't have in Saskatchewan."Sunchild said police are "in damage control mode. They're going to release whatever they can to try and assist their case. That includes information or disparaging comments about Evan Penner."In a video captured by a bystander of Penner's arrest on July 4, officers punch and use a taser on Penner before leading him to a police cruiser. He was also pepper sprayed. Penner faces charges including resisting arrest and assaulting a police officer.Watch the video here:The Public Complaints Commission is investigating the officers' actions. It's unclear when that work will be complete.In a lengthy Facebook post Thursday, the police union stated, "The Saskatoon Police Association does not feel it is fair for anyone to provide comments before the all facts of the incident are known."The post then describes some alleged details of the incident."It is important to remember that the officer involved in the incident on July 4th was in lawful execution of his duties and was assaulted," stated the post. "The Saskatoon Police Association unequivocally supports the member involved in this incident."Saskatoon police Chief Troy Cooper also revealed some alleged details about the Penner case this week.In an interview, police association spokesman Dave Larocque said they felt more details were necessary to help the public understand the background of the case."The only reason that we provided that information was to provide context," he said.Laroque said he hopes the public will withhold judgment on both the officers and Penner until the legal process is complete.Stewart said it's also hypocritical that Penner was criminally charged almost immediately after the incident, yet the commission could take months or years to decide if the officers did anything wrong. The lack of independent civilian oversight makes accountability even less likely, she said."Why is the default position that the police are correct? Everyone should be subject to equal scrutiny," Stewart said.Sunchild agreed."Law enforcement has the ability to lay these charges of resisting arrest or assaulting a police officer against a complainant when excessive force is used. That seems to be the trend to justify excessive use of force," Sunchild said. "Had there not been a video in this case, we would have seen only one side of this story, the side of law enforcement."Brian Pfefferle, co-president of the Saskatoon Criminal Defence Lawyers Association, said body cameras would have shown the entire police interaction with Penner. They also would have revealed whether there was more to the story or not, he said."If we want as a society to protect everybody, I'm a firm believer there's no better depicter of the facts that's completely independent and neutral than a video," Pfefferle said.Pfefferle said it's "fair criticism" that citizens are charged immediately, but charges against police take much longer. He said Saskatchewan could learn lessons from B.C., where there's a more rigourous approval process for Crown prosecutors to follow when police recommend certain charges.

  • Politics
    The Canadian Press

    Maryland governor says GOP needs 'bigger tent' after Trump

    A Republican governor rumoured to be eyeing a run for the White House in 2024 said Sunday that the GOP needs to be a “bigger tent party" after President Donald Trump leaves office. Maryland's Larry Hogan, who has been known to break with Trump, told NBC's “Meet the Press" that he doesn't “know what the future holds in November." “But I know that the Republican Party is going to be looking at what happens after President Trump and whether that’s in four months or four years,” Hogan said.

  • Trudeau added to witness list for Finance Committee hearing on WE Charity deal: Poilievre
    Politics
    Global News

    Trudeau added to witness list for Finance Committee hearing on WE Charity deal: Poilievre

    During a press conference in Ottawa on Sunday, Conservative Shadow Minister for Finance Pierre Poilievre announced that Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, along with Finance Minister Bill Morneau, have been added to the witness list for a Finance Committee sitting to "obtain answers" for the Trudeau-WE Charity controversy. The federal government had awarded a now-scrapped $900 million contract with WE Charity that would provide student volunteer funding — despite his family’s ties to the organization.

  • Health
    The Canadian Press

    Ontario anticipates Stage 3 of its pandemic plan as concerns rise in Quebec

    A lot of businesses across Ontario are eagerly awaiting an announcement today from the provincial government.With recent data indicating a gradual but steady decline in Ontario's COVID-19 caseload Premier Doug Ford is expected to unveil the next phase of the province's reopening strategy.The province said in a document released in late April that Stage 3 would include "opening all workplaces responsibly" and "further relaxing the restrictions on public gatherings."The document didn't get into specifics, though it did say restrictions would remain on large gatherings such as concerts and sporting events.Meanwhile, health officials in Quebec, the epicentre of the pandemic in Canada, are concerned about a spike in COVID-19 cases in Montreal linked to the reopening of the city's bars.Over the weekend Montreal's public health authority urged patrons and employees who have frequented bars since Canada Day to get tested for the coronavirus.Quebec reported 114 new COVID-19 infections Sunday, boosting its total to 56,521 cases.The province is to introduce mandatory masks on public transit starting today, with a two-week grace period before users will be denied service as of July 27.Montreal has also indicated that it intends to bring in mandatory masks for enclosed public spaces as of that date.On the East Coast, Prince Edward Island is reporting another new case of COVID-19 — a woman in her 80s from Queens County tested positive and is self-isolating at home.P.E.I. has reported four new cases of the infection since July 4 after being COVID-free during the months of May and June.Canada's COVID-19 case total currently stands at 107,589, including 8,783 deaths and 71,467 cases considered resolved.This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 13, 2020.The Canadian Press

  • News
    CBC

    Man wanted in Edmonton 'suspicious death' found dead in British Columbia

    A 39-year-old suspect in an Edmonton woman's death was found dead in British Columbia late Saturday.Early Saturday, officers found a deceased woman in a suite in a condo building at Mullen Road and Mullen Place in south Edmonton. Deeming the death suspicious, Edmonton police put out a call for public tips on the whereabouts of a 2019 white Toyota Tacoma. Investigators said the truck may be connected to the woman's death, and warned anyone who spotted it not to approach the vehicle or driver.Late Saturday, RCMP in Sicamous, B.C., located the truck, and found the male suspect, deceased, a short distance away from the vehicle. In a news release Sunday, Edmonton police said B.C. authorities will conduct an autopsy on the man. Edmonton police will maintain control of the investigation into the woman's death. That autopsy is scheduled for Tuesday. Edmonton police say they will work closely with Sicamous investigators, but said homicide detectives are not looking for any additional suspects.

  • Officials investigating after 'rare' collision between ships in Welland Canal
    Science
    CBC

    Officials investigating after 'rare' collision between ships in Welland Canal

    Officials are investigating how two cargo vessels came to collide in the Welland Canal on Saturday during what should have been a routine manoeuvre.Videos shared on social media show the Florence Spirt and Alanis crashing into one another, causing damage.The canal is located in southern Ontario and connects Lake Ontario with Lake Erie. The collision occurred at about 4 p.m. near Port Robinson, said Jean Aubry-Morin, vice-president of external relations for the St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corp. He described the crash as "rare.""It's a routine passage. It's an area that is common. Obviously, as witnessed by the public, there was an unfortunate incident that the two vessels collided."Alanis was heading up the canal toward Duluth, Minn., with a load of wind turbine parts, while the Florence Spirit was heading down to Quebec with a load of coal, Aubry-Morin said.No one was injured, and there was no fuel spill or other environmental impact, he said.Both vessels have since been moved to safe locations, where they will undergo complete inspections.Investigators are now working to determine how the two ships came to collide."We don't know if it's a mechanical failure of one of the vessels, most probably the Florence Spirit, or if it's a manoeuvre issue. At this point, it's too early to say," Aubry-Morin said.A 'preferred location' for passingVessels pass in that part of the canal hundreds of times each shipping season, especially at the location where the two ships crashed, he said."In fact, it's a preferred location for passing because there's plenty of space, speed is limited and it's typically a safe area for passage," Aubry-Morin said. "It's very unfortunate that this situation happened. We are curious to find what caused the situation."He said Transport Canada and the Transportation Safety Board (TSB) will also be investigating.A news release from the TSB confirmed it's deploying a team of investigators to the site to "gather information and assess the occurrence."

  • News
    CBC

    Oakville man charged following alleged 'hate motivated' assault

    A 34-year-old man from Oakville has been charged in connection with an alleged "hate motivated" assault on Saturday afternoon, Halton police say. According to a release issued Saturday, police were called to a parking lot in the area of Cornwall and Trafalgar roads around 2:30 p.m. for a disturbance.The accused was allegedly crouching down near the victim's vehicle when the victim, a person of colour, asked what he was doing. That's when the accused apparently yelled several racial slurs at the victim and assaulted him, according to reports told to officers by the victim and numerous witnesses at the scene. Upon arriving, the accused "actively resisted" an officer prior to being arrested, police say.The victim sustained minor injuries as a result of the incident. The arresting officer was uninjured.The accused has been charged with assault, and assault with intent to resist arrest and cause disturbance. He was released from custody and is scheduled to appear in court at a later date.

  • Pelosi says Trump 'messing with' children's health on school reopenings
    Politics
    Reuters

    Pelosi says Trump 'messing with' children's health on school reopenings

    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi accused President Donald Trump of "messing with" children's health on Sunday and said federal guidelines on reopening schools amid the coronavirus outbreak should be mandatory. The Democratic House of Representatives leader sharply criticized the Trump administration for advocating a return to school in the fall as coronavirus infections surge across the country, particularly in states that reopened their economies earliest during the pandemic. Critics of the Trump administration's pandemic response have long called for a national strategy on mitigation efforts.

  • Health
    The Canadian Press

    Ontario set to announce plans for Stage 3 of COVID reopening

    Premier Doug Ford is expected to announce plans for Stage 3 of Ontario's reopening today. Most of Ontario entered Stage 2 of reopening on June 19, with Toronto following five days later. The remaining regions were all in Stage 2 as of July 7, which included reopening patios and hair salons.

  • Aylmer hydro ruins to be removed if no buyer found
    News
    CBC

    Aylmer hydro ruins to be removed if no buyer found

    Quebec's transportation ministry has issued a mid-August deadline for a buyer to come forward to purchase the Deschênes Rapids ruins, or they'll be removed.That's according to a memo obtained by newspaper Le Droit and confirmed by Radio-Canada.The deadline has sparked an outcry, however, from politicians and businesspeople alike who wanted to turn the 135-year-old ruins into a whitewater rapids park.The memo sent June 12 by François Asselin, the ministry's regional director, announced the province's plans to remove the ruins within two months. Aylmer district Coun. Audrey Bureau believes the ministry isn't listening to local residents and businesses who have long campaigned to save the site.She said a group of local organizations hopes to transform the ruins into a world-renowned nautical centre, and they've already completed a soon-to-be-filed feasibility study."It doesn't make sense," Bureau said in a French-language interview with Radio-Canada. "The ruins are a collective asset for the entire population."She's asked the ministry to meet with the group and to allow time to review the feasibility study before going ahead with their removal.'A witness to our history'The president and CEO of Tourisme Outaouais, France Bélisle, received the minister's memo last month. She said she considers the removal plan premature, given local companies' interest."This project has immense potential that would generate economic spinoffs and would also help strengthen Gatineau's position in outdoor and sport tourism," she told Radio-Canada in French.The president of the Deschênes Residents Association, Howard Powles, expressed similar concerns about the Aug. 12 deadline."It's the most beautiful place," said Powles. "With the rapids and the ruins and the green spaces around, it's a glorious spot, and it's a witness to our history."The site was home to sawmills that gave way to power plants, he said, which powered a tram that connected Aylmer to Ottawa. Ruins also dangerousAccording to the government's memo, however, the combination of the ruins and the fast currents make rescue operations at the Deschênes Rapids perilous for both Gatineau and Ottawa first responders.Between 2007 and 2017, six people died or went missing in the water near the ruins, the province has said.Powles admits the waters around the rapids can be dangerous, but points out there haven't been any serious incidents in some years. Mathieu Lacombe, MNA for Papineau and the provincial minister for the Outaouais, told Radio-Canada he's prepared to support local MP André Fortin in pushing back the Aug. 12 deadline, noting the area's popularity with whitewater enthusiasts.

  • Politicians leave Stampede duds on the shelf for 2020
    Politics
    CBC

    Politicians leave Stampede duds on the shelf for 2020

    Calgary's Stampede may be the Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth for its rodeo, but it's also a chance for federal, provincial and municipal politicians to parade around the city.Like many aspects of the annual 10-day event cancelled and hampered by a global pandemic, Stampede didn't draw a crowd of political party leaders, backbenchers or councillors.An election year or not, Mount Royal University political scientist Duane Bratt says that for some politicians, Stampede is the one time of year they make a stop in Calgary."It's probably better that there's no election on the horizon," Bratt said. "[Prime Minister Justin] Trudeau used to always come to Stampede. Now, granted, he had seats here and had events here. Now he doesn't. So he's probably, as I said, not going to regret having to come to Calgary."Bratt said it's not just an opportunity for face time with constituents, but a big fundraising opportunity too — and likely part of the reason some parties had to apply for federal funding assistance to keep staffers employed.Politics has always been a big part of Stampede in the past, with all eyes on photo-ops and fashion faux-pas — like showing up in loafers instead of cowboy boots, Stephen Harper's critically panned fashion choices, or when NDP Leader Rachel Notley donned her cowboy hat backwards in 2015."One of my other memories during the Stampede parade, back when Joe Clark in his comeback was an MP in Calgary, his vintage car stopped working so he and his people had to push it," Bratt said. "Of course that's the photo that showed up in the paper. So, the opportunity for screwing up has been removed." Last year, Conservative Party leader Andrew Scheer flipped pancakes the same weekend former Green Party leader Elizabeth May made an appearance, both as a push for the 2019 federal election. Trudeau turned up later too, making two stops: one at a Laurier Club event for donors and another community breakfast. He didn't visit the grounds themselves.In the same 10-day span, five like-minded Canadian premiers stood elbow-to-elbow flipping flapjacks, invited by Premier Jason Kenney to meet ahead of the Council of the Federation meeting.This year stands in contrast. Without a parade to kick things off, Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi didn't ride a horse this year and his first pancake flip was Friday, days before the scaled-down celebrations were set to wrap up.He said typically he's got back-to-back events, hundreds throughout the week — this year his total will be under 10.That kind of connection with constituents, Nenshi said, can't be replaced with zoom calls."We've got to figure out ways that we can continue to make sure that politicians are hearing the voices of the people because they're sure not hearing them on Twitter," Nenshi said. Kenney marked Stampede with a video on his Facebook.And while there may have been drive-thru pancake events with politicians attending, they weren't well advertised this year.On Saturday, a number of constituents and politicians attended Conservative MP Jasraj Singh Hallan's Stampede breakfast in partnership with MaKami College at Marlborough Mall.Hallan said most of the events planned for his Stampede circuit had to be cancelled. He's still trying to be there for constituents virtually and over the phone, but in-person events are best."Obviously all the Stampede events this year look a lot different than in the past, but we're so glad to see the spirit is still alive," Hallan said."It's so important to know what's happening, what are the issues on the ground."Nenshi made a stop at the breakfast, along with Leela Aheer, Alberta's minister of culture, multiculturalism and status of women. "It's one of those amazing times where you get to meet folks from absolutely every walk of life and everybody's out enjoying each other together," Aheer said."You don't realize how lucky you are, how important that is until you just can't do that anymore."A spokesperson from Alberta's NDP wrote Stampede has always been a time for MLAs to connect with Calgarians. "Like many events and festivals, COVID-19 has forced the Stampede to shut down and we know that will be hard on Albertans, particularly business owners, and the arts and culture sector," the spokesperson wrote. "That's why one of the things Alberta's NDP Caucus will be doing is a virtual arts showcase to support local artists and performers." CBC News tried to reach the Conservative Party of Canada and did receive a response. In a statement to CBC News, the Liberal Party of Canada wrote while Stampede is cancelled, they are still working to make a better future for Calgary families."Stampede is a chance to celebrate our province's history and cultural traditions," said Morgan Breitkreutz, the director for operation in Alberta, Saskatchewan and North. "Even though we won't be together in person this year for pancake breakfasts or the parade, we'll still be celebrating what Stampede is all about."

  • Fort Good Hope starts up mini-meat plant to process multitudinous muskox
    News
    CBC

    Fort Good Hope starts up mini-meat plant to process multitudinous muskox

    Muskox are "just everywhere" in the Sahtu, said Daniel Jackson, the president of Fort Good Hope's renewable resource council. So much so, they're becoming a nuisance.Last week, muskox crowded the community's airport runway, and not for the first time.But for a community filled with hunters and surrounded by slow-moving, cow-like targets, Fort Good Hope's residents eat remarkably little muskox meat.That may be about to change, thanks to a mini-meat plant the renewable resource council says is ready for business.First given to the community in 2016, it's a simple trailer on the outside, filled with the kitchen equipment necessary to turn a muskox into delicious sausages and hamburgers.For years, it sat idle. But when officers from the Department of Environment and Natural Resources dispatched the latest bunch of muskox to endanger the community's air traffic, Jackson said they "didn't want the [meat] to go to waste."Chris Pereira, the renewable resource council's program manager, suggested they finally get the plant up and running."We got the meat in, we did the cutting, and we processed the meat into hamburgers and sausages and distributed it to the community," he said.It was such a success, the plan is for the council to run the plant full-time, offering a "cut-and-dress" service to process harvesters' meat, fish, and berries at cost.The trailer will provide full-time work for two people, plus more on a casual basis. And that's not all."Our plan is to hire people to go out fishing and hunting and bring the meat back to the processing unit," said Pereira. That meat will be sold at cost to community members who may not be able to hunt themselves."Everybody's saying that if they have access to local meat, they'd prefer that," Pereira said. "We're not planning to make a profit."Muskox on the rise, but local appetite is limitedOne major use of the facility will be processing muskox, which can be tricky for even skilled hunters."There is very little stomach, for lack of a better word, for muskox," said Kevin Chan, the Sahtu regional biologist for the Department of Environment and Natural Resources."It's a lot of work to process a muskox once you've harvested one, because of all the hair," he said.Muskox meat gets "extremely tough" when the animal is stressed before it dies, and requires hanging for 14 to 28 days, the department wrote in an email.Catch them near rutting season, Chan said, and they can also be "very smelly.""It's a very strong and unpleasant smell," he said.Still, Muskox were once a favourite of hunters — so much so, they were badly overhunted. A total ban on harvesting muskox was put in place in the 1930s, and today, non-Indigenous hunters in the Sahtu must apply for a tag to hunt one.Now, their population around the world is surging. In Fort Good Hope, muskox are practically an "invasive species," said Jackson, the council president.Chan said an estimate produced last year showed the population has increased as much as three to four times since 1997, and their range is expanding south of the treeline."[It's] something that is very unusual to see," he said.Meanwhile, barren-ground caribou, the staple food in the region, is rapidly declining in number. That's led some leaders to call for more "alternative harvest," to allow caribou a chance to recover."We're hoping that muskox harvest will increase … now that we have these issues with barren-ground caribou," said Chan.It's not just the meat that's valuable. The territory's Mackenzie Valley Genuine Fur Program pays upward of $200 for a muskox hide.There's some resistance to eating muskox meat in the Sahtu, said Jackson, where some believe the animals are damaging the health of the caribou herd. But for many, it may just be a matter of unfamiliarity."It's really good in some [seasons], but we're not used to it," he said. "So we gotta figure out when is the best eating."Jackson himself is already converted."I tried muskox steak," he said. "I didn't see a difference from muskox to moose."

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Canada's largest Indigenous police force has never shot anyone dead

    In its 26 years of existence, officers with Canada's largest Indigenous police force have never shot and killed anyone and no officer has died in the line of duty, despite a grinding lack of resources and an absence of normal accountability mechanisms. It's a record of which the Nishnawbe Aski Police Service is proud, especially in light of the recent uproar in North America over police killings and brutality involving Indigenous, Black, and mentally distressed people. It's a record achieved in communities frequently in social distress, places where hunting rifles and shotguns are ubiquitous.

  • Sask. man becomes BBQ king of Bulgaria
    Lifestyle
    CBC

    Sask. man becomes BBQ king of Bulgaria

    When an opportunity to live in Bulgaria came up, Christopher Shannon leapt at the chance.He didn't speak Bulgarian, or have a job, but in a decade he has managed to become somewhat famous in the Balkan nation for selling high end barbecues, smokers and grills.Shannon was born and raised in Regina, and lived in the Queen City until 2009.They moved when his wife, Nadya Mihaylova, wanted to be closer to her aging parents.Shannon said previous trips to the country had made him rethink about his life in Saskatchewan."I had a good job, it paid well, but I was working really long hours, and I was pretty sure I was looking at a heart attack, eventually, "he said. Shannon doesn't recommend moving to a foreign country without a job or a plan of how to get one."it can be a bit of an abyss. No language, no job, and no plan of what I was going to do," he said.'I realized there's money here'The idea to start a new business was sparked by a simple trip to buy a barbecue. The barbecues you could buy in Bulgaria 10 years ago were, in Shannon's words, "complete crap."He decided to import a good barbecue for himself from Europe. Then he thought others there would want the same.  "People thought I was crazy," said Shannon. "Family members were taking bets on how quickly I'd go bankrupt."Instead, he decided to spend a little time at an intersection close to his house. He said he counted the number of cars driving by that he couldn't afford."In a few minutes I saw a Lamborghini, a Ferrari and lots of Mercedes. I realized there's money here," he said.Shannon went against the naysayers and started Great Western Barbecue in Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria. He's selling high end grills that he imports from North American and Europe. Weber, Broil King and Napoleon grills are just a few of the brand names he sells.  He said it was very slow at first and admitted he did nearly everything he could think of to get the business going.He would barbecue on the street in front of his shop and hand out free samples. He'd hand out thousands of flyers and host barbecue events."I'd put on my Cowboy hat and start cooking, and people loved it."One of his earlier sales techniques got him in trouble with the police.  "It's illegal to sell anything on the side of the road in Bulgaria," he said.  "So I used to pretend my van was broken down. I'd park on the side of the road, jack it up and of course I'd have to take a couple of barbecues out of the back of my vehicle, and set them up along the highway."  He said the tactic managed to spark a lot of interest and sell a few barbecues, "until the police caught on to what I was doing."As the desire for high-end barbecues has grown, so has Shannon's popularity. He makes regular appearances on Bulgarian TV as the barbecue king, teaching people how to grill.He also said that the growing love of barbecue among the population is driving people to buy better cuts of meat and try different recipes on the grill.A famous familyWhile Shannon has gained notoriety in the past decade, he's still probably not as famous as his wife, Nadya Mihaylova.Mihaylova was a top-level athlete in rhythmic gymnastics in the 1980s under the name Nadia Kaloyanova. She was a national champion and competed around the world. In those years, Bulgaria was a powerhouse when it came to gymnastics.Mihaylova was a top contender for an Olympic gold medal, but fate and politics intervened. She was slated to compete in the 1984 Olympic games in Los Angeles, but the Soviet-led boycott that year dashed her hopes.A few years later, she moved to Regina to become the head coach of the Wascana Rhythmic Gymnastics Club. That's when she met Shannon.Today, she's still well-known and recognized in Bulgaria. At the peak of her athletic career, the country issued a trading card of Nadia Kaloyanova that was sold in packets of bubble gum. To this day, people still stop her, produce the card and ask for her autograph.These days Shannon is semi-retired and has staff running his store, but still brokers barbecues around the country."It's a pretty good life." he said.

  • Bear activity rising after spring hunt cancelled, outfitter says
    News
    CBC

    Bear activity rising after spring hunt cancelled, outfitter says

    If you're planning a trip to northern Saskatchewan this summer, your chances of running into a black bear might be a bit higher than usual.Jeff Smith runs an outfitting business near Choiceland, Sask., called Kutawagan Outfitters, and he's also the big game chairman for the Saskatchewan Commission of Professional Outfitters.He said he's heard of more encounters with bears, and the increase seems to coincide with the fact that there was no spring bear hunt."[Hunting] does help keep the bear numbers down because the bear has no enemies … so they just keep multiplying unless they're harvested," he said.Smith said Saskatchewan outfitters take approximately 2,500 non-resident clients each year, most of whom are U.S. residents. Those hunters typically harvest 2,000 bears each season."Without any 2020 U.S. bear clients, it's fair to say the provincial forest now has 2,000 more bears roaming about than normal," Smith estimates.The increase is small compared to the overall bear population in the province. Smith said he's heard estimates from the Ministry of Environment of 60,000-70,000 bears in the province, which would make the 2,000 extra bears a three per cent increase.But Smith isn't the only person who has heard reports of increased bear activity.Monica Osterhout with Prince Albert National Park previously told CBC there's been "quite a bit" of black bear activity in the park, both in the backcountry and even in the front country.Smith said the increase in activity is "a really good indication that it's important to keep harvesting these bears," noting that the effect is noticeable after only one season. The cancellation of the hunting season has had a huge impact on his livelihood, he says, but he notes it's having an impact on everyone else in the province, now, too."I think it's important that once the COVID is under control, that the border will open again and we can start harvesting bears again and … maybe there would be less negative interactions at the campsites, at the campgrounds."Bear habituation an ongoing problem, says guideRic Driediger agrees that there have been more human-bear interactions but he says that's due to bear baiting — when hunters put food out to bears to draw them to a particular place.Driediger is the owner of Churchill River Canoe Outfitters in Missinipe, Sask., and has been a guide in the area since 1973."They're willing to come right up to people in their campgrounds and in their campsites because they're used to eating the food that people give to them to eat," he said."This has been slowly increasing over the past 10 years or so and that coincides with bear hunting in this area, that coincides with bear baiting in this area."If a bear comes into one of his camps looking for food, his policy is to chase it away. If it comes back, he says, you chase it away again — and then you pack up and leave because it will be back again.He said in his first 20 years of guiding, he never had to move a campsite because of a bear and now it's fairly common."We hear about it pretty much every week that somebody had to move because of a bear and the only thing, in my view, that's changed is bear baiting."Driediger says the 2,000-bear increase this year that Smith estimates will mean there will be more bears around but the bigger issue is that they've become accustomed to humans."If the bears are afraid of people then it's not an issue," he said."There's whole generations of bears now that are comfortable around the smell of humans because they've associated the smell of humans with food."If you see a bear, don't runOne thing both Smith and Driediger agree on is what to do if you meet a bear.Driediger says bears are curious but they're also timid, which is why you can scare them away."I deal with the bear by being bigger than the bear or at least try to make the bear feel that I'm bigger than it is," he said.He also notes that it's "critically important" to keep a clean campsite — wash every surface that had food on it and put everything away in airtight containers."The bear that you meet in the wilderness was not interested in you as a person, they are interested in the food that you could provide," Driediger said.Smith notes that if you do run into a bear, "stay cool" and slowly back away. Whatever you do, don't run."If you run, there's a good chance that they're going to think that you are something they can eat," Smith said. "Just make yourself look as big as possible. Holler at it, wave your arms up in the air and slowly back down yourself and get someplace to where you're safe."

  • Ask an Expert: Managing Anxiety
    Health
    Global News

    Ask an Expert: Managing Anxiety

    As many Canadians head back to work, the tremendous uncertainty and change people face could trigger new levels of stress and worry. Dr. Rumeet Billan, Canadian Mental Health Association ambassador, shares her expert advice.