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Sacha Trudeau, left, Deborah Coyne, Justin Trudeau, Suzette Rouleau and ex-wife Margaret Trudeau-Kemper assemble behind the hearse that carrys the casket of Pierre Trudeau at the state funeral for the former Canadian Prime Minister October 3, 2000 in Montreal, Canada. The funeral was held at the Notre-Dame Basilica in Montreal. Trudeau died September 28, 2000 at the age of 80.

¨379591 01: Sacha Trudeau, left, Deborah Coyne, Justin Trudeau, Suzette Rouleau and ex-wife Margaret Trudeau-Kemper assemble behind the hearse that carrys the casket of Pierre Trudeau at the state funeral for the former Canadian Prime Minister October 3, 2000 in Montreal, Canada. The funeral was held at the Notre-Dame Basilica in Montreal. Trudeau died September 28, 2000 at the age of 80. (Photo by Pierre Roussel/Liaison)

Justin Trudeau through the years

Justin Trudeau has been named the new leader of the federal Liberal Party of Canada on Sunday, April 14.

  • B.C. fraudster's statutory release revoked after would-be 'big shot' slips up, again
    News
    CBC

    B.C. fraudster's statutory release revoked after would-be 'big shot' slips up, again

    A 70-year-old serial fraudster who fell from grace after once winning a fight in Canada's top court that preserved non-violent criminals' right to faster parole, is back in custody. The senior who has made her home in Qualicum and Burnaby B.C., has a history of fraud dating back to 1971, and a "persistent pattern" of committing fraud, theft and forgery since she was 23, according to Parole Board of Canada (PBC) documents. Slobbe is described as being "dishonest" to her case management team about her financial transactions and status in a PBC decision issued on Nov. 8.

  • Reunited: Chatham mother holds her boys for first time after a long, painful separation
    News
    CBC

    Reunited: Chatham mother holds her boys for first time after a long, painful separation

    A Chatham mother is overjoyed after being reunited with her two young sons on Sunday, after two and a half years. In 2015, Jolly Bimbachi's then husband took the boys to Lebanon for a family trip and never returned. Bimbachi's been fighting to get her sons back ever since.

  • Melania Trump takes custody of White House Christmas tree
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Melania Trump takes custody of White House Christmas tree

    Melania Trump, and son Barron, continued a time- honoured , first lady tradition on Monday: receiving the official White House Christmas tree. A military band quartet played holiday tunes as a horse-drawn wagon carried the 19 1/2-foot Balsam fir from Wisconsin up the White House driveway. The first lady, wearing a holiday red turtleneck and a coat draped over her shoulders, and Barron, in a dark suit coat, white shirt and dark slacks, emerged from the North Portico.

  • South Surrey residents worried about air quality as new rubber plant planned
    News
    CBC

    South Surrey residents worried about air quality as new rubber plant planned

    Some South Surrey residents want Metro Vancouver to revoke the permit it issued to a new rubber plant saying its emissions will pollute their neighbourhood. "Allowing this type of pollution is absolutely mind boggling," said Frank Mueggenburg, a local farmer. Metro Vancouver issued an environmental protection notice for the Weir Canada Inc. plant, located at 34A  Avenue.

  • Here's how to avoid a $110 fine on King Street starting Monday
    News
    CBC

    Here's how to avoid a $110 fine on King Street starting Monday

    Police will now ticket drivers who disobey the new rules of the road introduced as part of the King Street pilot project. Officers in the area have kept busy over the last week warning drivers — time and time again — not to drive straight through any intersection on King Street between Bathurst and Jarvis Streets. Clint Stibbe says police have stopped about 2,000 motorists since the project began last Sunday.

  • NDP leader Singh's new chief of staff brings brains, sober second thought
    News
    The Canadian Press

    NDP leader Singh's new chief of staff brings brains, sober second thought

    Federal NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh remembers being deeply impressed the first time he got to know Willy Blomme, the woman who would later become his new chief of staff. "She wasn't won over right away," Singh said of the 2015 encounter, which happened in Toronto at a tribute to former leader Jack Layton. Blomme, 36, has been involved in progressive political circles and the NDP since she was a teenager, but her new job is sure to be the most influential role she's played for the party to date — even more so than her work on Layton's own leadership campaign, and later as a speechwriter for the highly regarded NDP leader.

  • 'They've always wanted their own rooms': dad and 2 kids prepare to move into Habitat home
    News
    CBC

    'They've always wanted their own rooms': dad and 2 kids prepare to move into Habitat home

    As a father of two girls, Todd Gauthier says he always wanted each of his daughters to have a room of their own. "I hope something's set up in a way that there's not too many apartments being converted into condos any more.

  • Former Sears suppliers stock independent store
    Global News

    Former Sears suppliers stock independent store

    Mon, Nov 20: When Sears went bankrupt earlier this year, many of its suppliers were left without compensation and extra merchandise they needed to sell. As Sean O’Shea reports, they are among a group of vendors who are part of a new store concept in Markham, north of Toronto.

  • News
    CBC

    Annual checkups for healthy people may be harmful, study suggests

    Too much of almost anything can be bad for your health — even regular checkups with your doctor, new research suggests. The research, from the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care, involved researchers from across the country, including Dr. Neil Bell from the University of Alberta and James Dickinson from the University of Calgary. Researchers found that annual checkups "should not be a regular activity" for healthy people.

  • Family of Vancouver woman killed in Caprice Nightclub attack seeks closure in sentencing
    News
    CBC

    Family of Vancouver woman killed in Caprice Nightclub attack seeks closure in sentencing

    The parents of a young Vancouver woman killed during a night out on Granville Street last year say they're disappointed they're still waiting for the woman responsible to be sentenced. Burns and Joanne McLellan were in provincial court in Vancouver on Monday to hear a pre-sentencing report for Samantha Doolan, who has pleaded guilty to manslaughter in the August 2016 death of 28-year-old Lauren McLellan.

  • Bartiromo says comments about Trump taken out of context
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Bartiromo says comments about Trump taken out of context

    Fox News' Maria Bartiromo said Monday she was taken "wildly out of context" with her on-air claim that there had been no sexual misconduct allegations against President Donald Trump. Bartiromo said Monday that she was aware of women — more than a dozen — who had made accusations against Trump during last year's presidential campaign. Trump has said those stories are untrue.

  • Investigators: Roy Halladay performed turns before crash
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Investigators: Roy Halladay performed turns before crash

    Retired star pitcher Roy Halladay sped his small sports plane low over the Gulf of Mexico minutes before his fatal crash two weeks ago, climbing sharply in the final seconds before diving into the water, federal investigators said in a preliminary report released Monday. National Transportation Safety Board investigator Noreen Price placed no blame for the Nov. 7 accident near Tampa, simply laying out the facts as gleaned from the plane's data recorder and eyewitnesses. Price says Halladay, 40, had taken off from a lake near his Tampa-area home about 17 minutes before the crash, taking his ICON A5 to 1,900 feet (580 metres ) before dropping to 600 feet (180 metres ) as he neared the coastline.

  • Vancouver's housing and opioid crises are linked, says addictions expert
    News
    CBC

    Vancouver's housing and opioid crises are linked, says addictions expert

    Johann Hari — a journalist, addictions expert and New York times best-selling author ofChasing the Scream: The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs — has travelled the world to see how different countries approach drug addiction. "The core of addiction is about not wanting to be present in your life because your life is too painful place to be," Hari said. Hari praises the early response by organizations like The Portland Hotel Society to address housing in underprivileged communities here.

  • Unemployment remains biggest hurdle to Alberta's economic growth, says ATB report
    News
    CBC

    Unemployment remains biggest hurdle to Alberta's economic growth, says ATB report

    A new report from ATB Financial says although Alberta's economy is improving, unemployment remains a challenge. Chief economist Todd Hirsch says that after two years of recession in Alberta, GDP growth will be about four per cent in 2017, among the highest in the country. Despite that, Hirsch expects Alberta's unemployment rate to remain at about eight per cent.

  • Premier Brian Pallister was lost in dark New Mexico wilderness for hours before breaking arm
    News
    CBC

    Premier Brian Pallister was lost in dark New Mexico wilderness for hours before breaking arm

    Manitoba's premier spent several hours lost in the dark in the remote New Mexico wilderness, not because he was injured but because he was lost, according to new information provided by New Mexico State Police Monday. Information provided by state police reveals that it was not injury that prevented Brian Pallister from meeting up with his wife while hiking the Mogollon Trail in the Gila Wilderness last week. Lt. Elizabeth Armijo, a spokesperson for the state police, told CBC News that Esther Pallister first called 911 at 6 p.m. to report him missing and it was three hours before he was found.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Man and woman charged with manslaughter in July homicide in Burnaby, B.C.

    Manslaughter charges have been laid against a man and woman after a 22-year-old man died following an altercation at a busy Starbucks coffee shop in Metro Vancouver. Manslaughter charges were secured against Lawrence Sharpe, 40, and Oldouz Pournouruz, 35, on Saturday, police said in a news release. Frank Jang of the Integrated Homicide Investigation Team said Burnaby RCMP responded to an alleged assault on the afternoon of July 12.

  • LGBTQ advocates want military, RCMP, public service to take part in apology
    News
    The Canadian Press

    LGBTQ advocates want military, RCMP, public service to take part in apology

    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau should not be the only one to say sorry for state-sanctioned discrimination against LGBTQ people, say advocates who have long demanded the federal government apologize for years of persecution. Lynne Gouliquer, a military veteran who has researched the history of how LGBTQ people were hounded out of their jobs in the military and the federal government, said she wants to see the heads of the institutions responsible take part in the Nov. 28 apology in the House of Commons.

  • Edmonton council may be guilty of bullying, harassing staff, mayor admits
    News
    CBC

    Edmonton council may be guilty of bullying, harassing staff, mayor admits

    Edmonton Mayor Don Iveson admits his council may be guilty of harassing behaviour toward city employees. The admission came on a day that started with an apology from the city manager to city employees who say they've been harassed or experienced discrimination in the workplace. "For staff who've come forward in obvious pain, I am sorry," city manager Linda Cochrane said at the beginning of the audit committee meeting.

  • OPP seeks help to identify male pedestrian killed on highway north of Toronto
    News
    CBC

    OPP seeks help to identify male pedestrian killed on highway north of Toronto

    Ontario Provincial Police are appealing to the public for help to identify a man who was killed overnight while pushing a bicycle on a highway in York Region. Sgt. Kerry Schmidt, spokesperson for the OPP's Highway Safety Division, said the OPP received a call about the fatal pedestrian crash on Highway 48 near Davis Drive around midnight on Sunday.

  • Exercises in learning: Occupational and physiotherapist assistant programs to launch next fall
    News
    CBC

    Exercises in learning: Occupational and physiotherapist assistant programs to launch next fall

    Holland College is set to launch new occupational therapist and physiotherapist assistant programs next year. The college's director of athletics and recreation, Albert Roche, says there's a demand for these positions in the workplace.

  • Vancouver criminals target elderly woman in bank scam
    News
    CBC

    Vancouver criminals target elderly woman in bank scam

    Vancouver police issued a warning Monday about a banking scam aimed at elderly people. On Nov. 17, a 94-year-old Vancouver woman got a phone call at home from a woman claiming she was a security officer at a local bank, according to police.

  • Crocodile Wanders Onto Florida Beach
    AP Canada

    Crocodile Wanders Onto Florida Beach

    The sight of a crocodile drew a crowd of onlookers along Hollywood Beach in Florida on Monday morning. (Nov. 20)

  • Decision on Haitians' status in the U.S. has Canada on alert for asylum seekers
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Decision on Haitians' status in the U.S. has Canada on alert for asylum seekers

    A decision by the Trump administration to end a temporary residency permit program that has allowed almost 60,000 Haitians to live and work in the United States has the Canadian government on alert for a potential new surge of asylum seekers at the border. The Homeland Security Department said late Monday that conditions in Haiti have improved significantly, so the benefit will be extended one last time — until July 2019 — to give Haitians time to prepare to return home. Haitians were placed on notice earlier this year, and, few months later, waves of people began crossing illegally into Canada from the U.S. to claim asylum, catching the Liberals off guard when the crowds began to number more than 200 people a day.

  • Warming to make thunderstorms larger and more frequent
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Warming to make thunderstorms larger and more frequent

    Summer thunderstorms in North America will likely be larger, wetter and more frequent in a warmer world, dumping 80 per cent more rain in some areas and worsening flooding, a new study says. By the end of century if emissions aren't curbed, these gully washers will be much worse because they will get bigger, said Andreas Prein, a climate scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado, who led the study. Prein and colleagues used high-resolution computer simulations to see how global warming will likely change the large thunderstorms that are already daily summer events in North America.

  • News
    CBC

    7 people charged for bootlegging in northern Sask.

    During a round of check stops in northern Saskatchewan, authorities seized alcohol they say would've been resold for $13,000. On Nov. 18 and 19, RCMP from Prince Albert, Sandy Bay and Pelican Narrows, Prince Albert Traffic Services and officers from the Ministry of Environment conducted two days of enforcement on roads in the Creighton area, looking for alcohol and traffic-related offences. A total of seven people were charged for bootlegging and their alcohol was seized.