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JC Chasez, Tara Reid

*NSYNC Members' Surprising Relationships

Pink and Joey Fatone? JC Chasez and Eva Longoria? Justin Timberlake and Fergie?! The boys of *NSYNC have had some surprising celebrity relationships over the years. --by Carly Maga

  • Attorney General announces major changes to Ontario's police oversight system
    News
    CBC

    Attorney General announces major changes to Ontario's police oversight system

    Doug Ford's Progressive Conservative government is overhauling police oversight in Ontario, making changes to the Special Investigations Unit (SIU), as well as the mechanism through which members of the public make complaints. Attorney General Caroline Mulroney and Minister of Community Safety and Correctional Services Sylvia Jones announced the changes at Halton Regional Police headquarters in Oakville, Ont., on Tuesday morning. The changes are encompassed in new legislation that's yet to be passed: the Comprehensive Police Services Act, 2019.

  • Saskatoon police plane finds missing North Battleford, Sask. man in wooded area using thermal imaging camera
    News
    CBC

    Saskatoon police plane finds missing North Battleford, Sask. man in wooded area using thermal imaging camera

    RCMP say the Saskatoon Police Service's Air Support Unit was instrumental in saving the life of a 66-year-old man in North Battleford, Sask. On Monday, Gordon Bingham, 66, was reported missing after leaving his home on that morning at around 7 a.m. CST. Bingham is legally blind, and police were called when he did not return home.

  • U.S. concerned over Hezbollah's growing role in Lebanon
    News
    Reuters

    U.S. concerned over Hezbollah's growing role in Lebanon

    Hezbollah's growing role in the Lebanese government worries the United States, the U.S. ambassador to Lebanon said during a meeting with Prime Minister Saad al-Hariri on Tuesday, according to the U.S. embassy. The armed Shi'ite group, which is backed by Iran and listed as a terrorist organization by the United States, controls three of the 30 ministries in Hariri's new cabinet, the largest number it has ever held. U.S. Ambassador Elizabeth Richard, speaking after the meeting, said she had been "very frank ... about U.S. concern over the growing role in the cabinet of an organization that continues to maintain a militia that is not under the control of the government", according to an embassy statement.

  • Zero-waste pub coming to St-Hubert Plaza later this year
    News
    CBC

    Zero-waste pub coming to St-Hubert Plaza later this year

    The friends are a tight-knit group who decided it was time to offer Montrealers a place to drink that offers reusable napkins, no plastic straws and a minimal amount of food to reduce the pub's impact on the environment. Wine bottles, Gendron said, are another challenge as many are not recyclable. To combat food waste, he said small, medium and large portions will be available.

  • P.E.I. will continue standardized student testing
    News
    CBC

    P.E.I. will continue standardized student testing

    A consultant reviewing standardized testing used in P.E.I. schools has recommended the province continue the student assessment program in its present format. "I can tell you that the assessment program is operating well the way it is right now," said the firm's leader, Richard Jones. "Since the assessment program was implemented 10 years ago, Island students have made tremendous gains," said provincial Education Minister Jordan Brown.

  • Lemonade stand founder wins Governor General award for volunteering
    News
    CBC

    Lemonade stand founder wins Governor General award for volunteering

    Maya Mikhael was at a figure skating competition when she found out she was going to receive a Governor General's award."It made me feel really good," said Mikhael. "I'm very proud of myself."Mikhael is the founder of Maya's Friends Lemonade Stand, a charitable organization that she started when she was younger. She's raised more than $12,000 for the homeless and hungry in Windsor over the last five years.Governor General Julie Payette has deemed Mikhael's efforts worthy of the Medal for Volunteers. The award is a national honour that anyone can fill out a nomination for. An independent advisory committee reviews those nominations, and then makes recommendations to the Governor General."I was really, really happy," Mikhael said about finding out. She'll receive the actual medal at a ceremony in the next two years. "It's worth the wait."Windsor's Lebanese community previously honoured Mikhael with a leadership award in 2017."I feel excited, I feel honoured," said Mikhael's dad John. He wants more parents to get involved with their kids.John said it's not about the medal, it's about what the medal represents."It's rewarding for the parents and the kids, and the community," said John. "It's part of my legacy."

  • EU's Vestager says not precluding Facebook case in future
    News
    Reuters

    EU's Vestager says not precluding Facebook case in future

    Facebook is not currently in EU regulators' crosshairs but it may well be in future because of the crucial role played by data, Europe's antitrust chief said on Tuesday. European Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager's comments came two weeks after the German cartel office ruled that the world's largest social network abused its market dominance to gather information about users without their consent. Vestager said she has no case against Facebook regarding its market power for now but nevertheless was monitoring the market.

  • Alberta announces deal with CN, CP to ship crude by rail
    News
    CBC

    Alberta announces deal with CN, CP to ship crude by rail

    The Alberta government has signed contracts with Canadian National and Canadian Pacific to lease 4,400 rail cars to take oilsands crude to American and international markets. The first shipments of 20,000 barrels per day are expected to start by July. Full capacity is expected by mid-2020 when up to 120,000 barrels per day will be shipped by rail.

  • Rescued Labrador snowmobiler owes his life to search and rescue team, say police
    News
    CBC

    Rescued Labrador snowmobiler owes his life to search and rescue team, say police

    A snowmobiler who ran out of gas and got lost was found walking outside Hopedale early Monday morning by the community's search and rescue team — and police say they likely saved the man's life. RCMP in Hopedale, a town along Labrador's northern coast, received a report around 7 p.m. Sunday of a snowmobiler who was overdue from a wood-cutting trip. The man had left Hopedale that morning and was expected back around 3 p.m., but the weather had deteriorated in the afternoon, with high winds and whiteout conditions.

  • NSLC sells $17M in cannabis, but it's not enough to turn a profit on pot
    News
    CBC

    NSLC sells $17M in cannabis, but it's not enough to turn a profit on pot

    The NSLC currently has 12 stores that sell cannabis, but last week Finance Minister Karen Casey said the province has asked the corporation to look at increasing that number because of lower than expected online sales. On Tuesday, the NSLC released its third quarter sales results, which included a break down of how much cannabis it sold.

  • AC/DC rocker Angus Young donates for Alzheimer's, inspired by Canadian fan's 19-hour skates
    News
    CBC

    AC/DC rocker Angus Young donates for Alzheimer's, inspired by Canadian fan's 19-hour skates

    Now the musician's younger brother, band co-founder and lead guitarist Angus Young, has donated $19,260 Cdn to the Alzheimer Society of Ontario, McNeil said. "This is AC/DC. The band's accountant, Vicky Granados of the accounting firm Prager Metis, says Young and his wife, Ella, "stumbled across" an article about McNeil's 19-hour skates and asked her to write CBC for more details about supporting his fundraiser.

  • Andrew Scheer comments after question period on SNC-Lavalin controversy.
    Canadian Press Videos

    Andrew Scheer comments after question period on SNC-Lavalin controversy.

    Conservative Party Leader Andrew Scheer speaks with reporters after question period about SNC-Lavalin.

  • 'We're doing all the right things': Homan, Courtney curling while pregnant at Scotties
    News
    CBC

    'We're doing all the right things': Homan, Courtney curling while pregnant at Scotties

    SYDNEY, N.S. — Rachel Homan's Ontario rink has two extra members on the ice at this year's Scotties. Both the skip and the team's second, Joanne Courtney, are playing while pregnant. Homan's due date is June 14 and Courtney's is July 11.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Bad weather halts search for missing B.C. snowshoer until at least Wednesday

    VANCOUVER — North Vancouver RCMP say the search for a missing snowshoer in the rugged North Shore backcountry will resume when weather and snow conditions allow for a safe and thorough air and ground search.Cpl. Richard De Jong says in a news release that a 39-year-old Surrey, B.C., man is missing after he and a friend were caught in an avalanche north of Mount Seymour.The avalanche occurred Monday morning as the missing man and a 30-year-old friend, who is also from Surrey, were snowshoeing through a challenging area between Runner Peak and Mount Elsay.Police say the younger man was not hurt and was able to cling to a tree and call for help.Dangerous conditions hampered the search effort but members of North Shore Rescue were able to reach the man late Monday and he was airlifted off the mountain.The search was suspended Monday night and the decision to delay further efforts for at least 24 hours was made early Tuesday as Environment Canada called for up to 10 centimetres of snow across parts of Metro Vancouver.North Shore Rescue team leader Mike Danks has said the situation does not look good for a positive outcome but the team will continue to hope for the best.Despite improved conditions expected Wednesday, the continuing avalanche risk will limit the number of searchers and avalanche dogs that can be sent into the area, he said.After the rescued snowshoer was airlifted to safety, a team from Whistler Blackcomb ski resort dropped explosives from a helicopter to try to ease the danger of further slides.Avalanche conditions are rated as moderate at higher elevations of the North Shore mountains.The Avalanche Canada website said 30 to 50 centimetres of recent snow may have created the risk of slab avalanches because the new snow is poorly bonded to the base. (The Canadian Press, News1130)The Canadian Press

  • Seven children from same family killed in Canadian house fire
    News
    Reuters

    Seven children from same family killed in Canadian house fire

    A house fire in the eastern Canadian city of Halifax has killed seven children from the same family, Halifax police said on Tuesday. The Canadian Broadcasting Corp identified the family as Syrian refugees and said the children ranged from three months to 17 years old. Police and fire officials have not yet determined the cause of the fire.

  • Ottawa's snow mountain just keeps piling up
    News
    CBC

    Ottawa's snow mountain just keeps piling up

    Standing more than 50 metres tall and covering the area of several football fields, the snow storage facility on Clyde Avenue is Ottawa's largest, a towering monument to winter that remains long after the spring melt has finished with the rest of the city. "This snow is predominantly from the downtown core area and a little bit south of the facility here," Denyes explained on Ottawa Morning. "Once we have some warm temperatures there's always a risk of it sliding down, hence the avalanche risk," Denyes said.

  • City ombudsman monitoring snow removal concerns after hearing 'many stories' from public
    News
    CBC

    City ombudsman monitoring snow removal concerns after hearing 'many stories' from public

    Toronto's ombudsman is closely monitoring issues relating to the removal of snow following broad-based public concern about the pace at which streets have been cleaned this winter. "We have heard many stories of people reporting that sidewalks, roads, bike lanes or public paths have not been cleared of snow and ice in a timely way," Susan Opler said in a written statement released Tuesday. The recent winter storm prompted Mayor John Tory to call for a review of Toronto's winter operations in a letter to the head of the transportation services department.

  • 'Making this up:' Study says oilsands assessments marred by weak science
    News
    The Canadian Press

    'Making this up:' Study says oilsands assessments marred by weak science

    EDMONTON — Dozens of oilsands environmental impact studies are marred by inconsistent science that's rarely subjected to independent checks, says a university study. "It doesn't make any sense," says University of British Columbia biology professor Adam Ford, who published his findings in the journal Environmental Reviews."You would have to go out of your way to make it this bad. It's just a symptom of the state of the industry and it's definitely a signal that we can do better."In 30 different assessments filed between 2004 and 2017, Ford found each study considered different factors in different ways. Few independently checked their conclusions. And those who did were notably less confident about the industry's ability to restore what it had disturbed.Ford says the inconsistent approach means the resulting tens of thousands of pages piled in the offices of the Alberta Energy Regulator reveal little about the overall health of one of the most heavily industrialized landscapes in Canada.Energy companies planning to build oilsands projects must file an environmental impact assessment. Such assessments generally take representative species and consider, based on expert opinion, how development would affect different aspects of their habitat.Ford found 35 different species were studied. Only one — moose — appeared in all 30 assessments. Only 10 appeared in more than half of them.Some assessments looked at species groups; some didn't. Some differed on their definition of wildlife habitat."You would think that projects that are that close together, that are similar in nature, would have a more common set of shared species," he said.Moreover, the ways used to evaluate industrial impact were all different. Some 316 different mathematical models were used to measure habitat and they came up with different results from each other 82 per cent of the time.Only 33 of the models were independently verified by field data or separate statistical methods. Ford found the assessments that used verification were about twice as likely to project serious lingering environmental impacts.Since there's so much variation with so little checking, there's no way to tell which assessments are more accurate, Ford says."Given the largely inconsistent approaches used to measure and rank 'habitat,' we have no basis with which to measure the performance, accuracy, or reliability of most habitat models used in oilsands (assessment)," the paper says.The stakes are high.Land disturbed by the 30 projects covered nearly 900 square kilometres. About half of it was considered high-quality habitat.The paper also says that of the 1681 oilsands applications made to the regulator since December 2013, 91 per cent were approved and one per cent denied."It is not clear if or how reporting negative impacts on wildlife in an (assessment) has any bearing on project approval," it concludes.The Alberta Energy Regulator declined to comment on the paper. Ford suggests standardized oilsands assessments would be faster, cheaper and more likely to produce a clear picture of what's happening in northern Alberta."What are the species we need to know about? We have experts in Canada who spend their entire lives thinking about these species. Let's get them involved so we can create robust habitat models, so that we don't have to revisit everybody's individual opinion."Ford says the current approach has real consequences for real people."There's people who live on this land (whose) culture and way of life is tied to those animals. And we're telling them we're pretty much making this up."— Follow Bob Weber on Twitter at @row1960 Bob Weber, The Canadian PressNote to readers: This is a corrected story. An earlier version said land disturbed by 30 projects covered an area roughly the size of the Greater Toronto Area.

  • Payless seeks creditor protection, plans to close stores in U.S. and Canada
    News
    CBC

    Payless seeks creditor protection, plans to close stores in U.S. and Canada

    Payless Shoes is going into creditor protection in the U.S. and Canada, where it will likely close all its stores.The discount shoe retailer, with more than 3,400 stores in 40 countries, is seeking protection from its creditors under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code, and the Canadian equivalent, the Companies' Creditors Arrangement Act."Payless intends to use these proceedings to facilitate a wind-down of its approximately 2,500 store locations in North America and its e-commerce operations," the company said in a statement.The company has 248 locations across Canada, about half of which are in Ontario. All in, the chain employs just over 2,400 people in Canada, and court documents suggest the stores collectively lost $12 million US last year.The stores "are insolvent and are unable to meet their liabilities as they become due," court documents suggest.They say 220 of the Canadian stores couldn't come up with rent for the current month.Payless, founded in Kansas in 1956, grew to become one of the biggest shoe sellers in the world, selling more than 110 million pairs a year in its heyday. But the chain has fallen on tough times of late, and already went through creditor protection as recently as 2017, a process that spared the Canadian locations at the time.That doesn't seem to be the case this time around, as the company says the plan is to liquidate all of its stores in the U.S. and Canada as quickly as possible."The challenges facing retailers today are well documented, and unfortunately Payless emerged from its prior reorganization ill-equipped to survive in today's retail environment," chief restructuring officer Stephen Marotta said. "The prior proceedings left the company with too much remaining debt, too large a store footprint."The company's first bankruptcy proceedings, in 2017, saw the retailer close about 900 stores and restructure some of the debt it incurred as part of a private equity deal five years earlier. Part of Payless's problem, retail consultant Antony Karabus of HRC Retail Advisory said in an interview, is that the first restructuring didn't do enough to fix problems underlying the business. Instead, it just tried to clean up the balance sheet."For Payless, it bought six or 12 months, that's all it did," he said.While many retailers have been hit with a shrinking demand for their products, that isn't necessarily the case for Payless. Karabus said discount footwear is a large and growing market, so the company's problems were in failing to capitalize on that.Even after coming out of bankruptcy protection once, the company still has more than $400 million in debt on its books, he notes."When a slow growth retailer has debt put on the balance sheet, it is extremely tough to be able to withstand that incredibly significant liability," he said.Payless said it plans to ask for the court's permission to honour gift cards and store credit until March 11, 2019, and to continue to allow returns and exchanges of applicable non-final sale purchases until March 1, 2019.The chain's loyalty rewards program, along with any other outstanding coupons, are discontinued, effective immediately.If everything goes according to plan, the chain will cease to exist in Canada and the U.S. by May.Stores outside North America — including in the Middle East, India, Indonesia, Indochina, Philippines, Africa, Latin America and various parts of the Caribbean — will still go on, as they are largely profitable.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Justice Thomas calls for re-examining landmark libel case

    WASHINGTON — Justice Clarence Thomas says the Supreme Court should consider overturning a 55-year-old landmark ruling that makes it hard for public figures to win libel suits, writing in a case involving a woman who says Bill Cosby raped her.Thomas took aim at New York Times v. Sullivan and similar cases that followed it, calling them "policy-driven decisions masquerading as constitutional law.""We should not continue to reflexively apply this policy-driven approach to the Constitution," Thomas wrote in a 14-page opinion that no other justice joined.The opinion comes against the backdrop of President Donald Trump's repeated calls to make it easier to sue for libel. Last weekend, Trump reacted to a Saturday Night Live skit by asking on Twitter, "How do the Networks get away with these total Republican hit jobs without retribution? Likewise for many other shows? Very unfair and should be looked into."On Tuesday, the high court rejected an appeal from actress Kathrine McKee, who said Cosby raped her in 1974. McKee sued Cosby for damaging her reputation after a lawyer for the comedian allegedly leaked a letter attacking McKee. Two lower courts ruled against her and dismissed the case, based largely on McKee's role as a public figure.The Sullivan case set a very high bar for public officials to win a libel suit and hefty money awards over published false statements that damaged their reputations. The high court extended the 1964 decision in the ensuing decades to make it tough for celebrities, politicians and other public figures to win defamation cases.Thomas is the justice who most often calls for jettisoning Supreme Court rulings that he says do not comport with the meaning of the Constitution at the time it was adopted."The states are perfectly capable of striking an acceptable balance between encouraging robust public discourse and providing a meaningful remedy for reputational harm," he wrote.He is not the first justice to criticize the 1964 case, though he appears to be the first to issue a call for its reconsideration in a Supreme Court opinion. The late Justice Antonin Scalia took a similarly dim view of the Sullivan ruling, once saying in a televised interview that he abhorred it.Mark Sherman, The Associated Press

  • Michael B. Jordan, Michelle Yeoh added to Oscars presenters
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Michael B. Jordan, Michelle Yeoh added to Oscars presenters

    LOS ANGELES — Michael B. Jordan, Brian Tyree Henry, Michelle Yeoh and Elsie Fisher may have missed out on Oscar nominations this year, but they will be on stage at the Dolby Theatre during Sunday's ceremony.

  • 'Weight lifted' after $802 tip returned by Fredericton restaurant
    News
    CBC

    'Weight lifted' after $802 tip returned by Fredericton restaurant

    Joselyn Sceeles knows she's a good server, but she also knows an $800 tip is likely too good to be true. This Saturday, Sceeles was working the morning shift at Fredericton's Coffee Mill. Many people shared the post and gave advice on what to do: maybe call the credit card company?

  • Cornwall runs new tribute policy up the flagpole
    News
    CBC

    Cornwall runs new tribute policy up the flagpole

    Cornwall, Ont., could soon be lowering its flags far less often. Under its current policy, the eastern Ontario city lowers its flags to half-mast whenever a city employee or elected official — current or former — dies. The recent death of a Cornwall Transit bus operator, for example, prompted the lowering of flags in the city from Jan. 28 to Feb. 9.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Review: Tom Rosenstiel looks at murky politics after attack

    Ex-Army investigator and political fixer Peter Rena and his partner, Randi Brooks, are taking on their next adventure in the swamp of Washington, D.C., and the central event is a deadly attack on a diplomatic complex in North Africa. The team of Rena and Brooks quickly find themselves assigned by the president to find out what happened and why. There are careers at stake, from the White House on down, as well as foreign policy goals of an administration winding up its term.

  • Why microwaving grapes creates a dazzling plasma light show
    News
    CBC

    Why microwaving grapes creates a dazzling plasma light show

    What's even more amazing is that the "fire" isn't actually fire — it's a state of matter called plasma that's made up of ions and free electrons that aren't tied to atoms or molecules (unlike electrons in a solid, liquid or gas). It's not that hard to generate plasma from metals like the mercury vapour in a fluorescent light bulb or even a scrap of aluminum foil in your microwave. Canadian researchers say they've come up with an answer, which they published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.