Podcast: Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger on gender equality, share buybacks, investing in China, and executive compensation

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At the 2018 Berkshire Hathaway Annual Shareholder Meeting, Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger advocate gender equality among senior management in big companies. The duo also talks about capital allocation, why they don’t invest in big tech companies, and the challenges of determining employee pay.

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