Poland gets Jim Cramer to apologize for comparing Macy’s to its WWII army

Michael Walsh
Reporter
Jim Cramer attends a benefit lunch in New York in October. (Photo: Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)

The Polish Embassy in the United States took issue with CNBC “Mad Money” host Jim Cramer’s decision to belittle Macy’s marketing tactics with a comparison to the Polish army’s efforts against the Nazi invasion in World War II.

According to the embassy’s statement Tuesday afternoon, Cramer had made an “inaccurate and insensitive” statement on May 11: “Macy’s is like the Polish Army in WWII — it tried to field cavalry against German tanks and it did not end well.”

The statement says it’s inappropriate to compare men and women in uniform to a department store and that it’s historically inaccurate.

The embassy further demanded a retraction from Cramer — and got it.


Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union jointly invaded Poland in September 1939. As explained in the statement, the Polish army fought back “gallantly against the odds,” but did not deploy cavalry against German tanks.

“This is pure Nazi and Communist propaganda that continues to weave its way into Western media reports to this very day. If the mainstream media is to be respected by viewers, it cannot recycle old Nazi propaganda,” it reads.

The statement clarifies that a small number of Polish cavalry charges in 1939 were directed against Nazi infantry, artillery and supplies, but never tanks.

“Over 75 years have passed since the start of World War II, it is time to abandon false claims based on propaganda,” the statement reads.

An NBC representative redirected Yahoo News to Cramer’s Twitter page when asked for comment. He simply wrote, “Duly noted. I am sorry. It will not happen again…”

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