Police lay charges against in death of 91-year-old man in Oakville, Ont.

OAKVILLE, Ont. — A 23-year-old man from Brampton, Ont., has been charged with first-degree murder in the death of an elderly man in nearby Oakville, police west of Toronto said Friday morning.

Halton Regional Police held a news conference to announce the charge against Dazel Decosta Henry in the death of Edmund Ferrari on the afternoon of Aug. 24.

The 91-year-old was found on the sidewalk outside his retirement home with "obvious injuries to his chest" and died at the scene, according to a police news release at the time.

Halton police Chief Stephen Tanner said Friday that Ferrari's death was a seemingly random attack, but a motive could become clear in court.

"It is unimaginable to me that someone lives for more than 90 years, and then meets such a violent end, as did Mr. Ferrari, on a Saturday afternoon while out for a walk," said Tanner.

"He certainly did nothing to deserve this ... and it's an absolute tragedy."

Tanner said Ferrari and Henry were not known to each other, adding that Ferrari had no previous criminal record.

Supt. Kevin Maher said Friday that officers from Halton Region arrested Henry earlier that morning in Toronto, where he was in custody in relation to several other alleged incidents.

Toronto police alleged he was involved in an unprovoked attack on a woman in a fast food restaurant parking lot on Aug. 28.

They also allege he stabbed a 19-year-old man in the back and struck a 56-year-old taxi driver in the head in two separate incidents on Aug. 12.

Henry faces charges of aggravated assault, assault with a weapon, possession of a weapon and other counts in those previous incidents.

Halton police say they were able to identify him as the suspect in Ferrari's death thanks to video analysis assistance from police in Durham Region.

He made his first court appearance on the murder charge Friday morning, and Halton police say he will be in court again Oct. 24.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 18, 2019.

The Canadian Press