Porsche, Genesis Top Consumer Reports' 2020 Brand Rankings

feedback@motor1.com (Chris Bruce)
2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo

In the Top Pick list this year, there are lots of Toyotas, a couple of Subarus, and a Tesla.

Porsche takes the top spot in Consumer Reports' newly released Brand Report Card Rankings. The publication also put out its 10 Top Pick list that highlights CR's recommended vehicles in several classes, and Toyota did great by taking more suggestions than any other company.

In the brand rankings, Porsche jumped two spots from last year to be this year's winner. Right behind it, there's Genesis, and Subaru rounds out the top three. Mazda, Lexus, Audi, Hyundai, BMW, Kia, and Mini are the rest of the top ten of the 33 included brands. At the bottom of the list, there's Fiat in last place, and Mitsubishi and Jeep are just above it.

More Recommendations From Consumer Reports:

"The brands at the top of our rankings do a great job of producing cars that perform well in our road tests, and are reliable, safe, and highly satisfying," said Jake Fisher, Senior Director of Automotive Testing at Consumer Reports, said in the announcement of this year's results.

Consumer Reports separates its Top Picks by price. The Toyota Corolla is the only vehicle in the under $25,000 category. The Subaru Forester, Legacy, Toyota Prius, and Prius Prime are the choices costing between $25,000 and $35,000. For $35,000 to $45,000, CR suggests the Kia Telluride, Honda Ridgeline, and Toyota Avalon. Finally, the Lexus RX, Tesla Model 3, and Toyota Supra are the suggestions with prices between $45,000 and $55,000.


  • More evidence indicates healthy people can spread virus
    News
    The Canadian Press

    More evidence indicates healthy people can spread virus

    NEW YORK — Scientists offered more evidence Wednesday that the coronavirus is spread by seemingly healthy people who show no clear symptoms, and the federal government issued new guidance warning that anyone exposed to the disease can be considered a carrier.A study by researchers in Singapore became the latest to estimate that somewhere around 10% of new infections may be sparked by people who carry the virus but have not yet suffered its flu-like symptoms.In response to that study and others, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention changed how it defined the risk of infection for Americans. The agency's new guidance targeted people who have no symptoms but were exposed to others with known or suspected infections. It essentially says that anyone may be a carrier, whether that person has symptoms or not.The findings complicate efforts to gain control of the pandemic and reinforce the importance of social distancing and other measures designed to stop the spread, experts said.“You have to really be proactive about reducing contacts between people who seem perfectly healthy,” said Lauren Ancel Meyers, a University of Texas at Austin researcher who has studied coronavirus transmission in different countries.The newest research was published online by the CDC. It focused on 243 cases of coronavirus reported in Singapore from mid-January through mid-March, including 157 infections among people who had not travelled recently. Scientists found that so-called pre-symptomatic people triggered infections in seven different clusters of disease, accounting for about 6% of the locally acquired cases.One of those infections was particularly striking. A 52-year-old woman's infection was linked to her sitting in a seat at a church that had been occupied earlier in the day by two tourists who showed no symptoms but later fell ill, investigators said after they reviewed closed-circuit camera recordings of church services.An earlier study that focused on China, where the virus was first identified, suggested that more than 10% of transmissions were from people who were infected but did not yet feel sick.The seemingly healthy people who can transmit the virus are believed to fall into three categories: pre-symptomatic, who do not have symptoms when they spread but develop illness a couple of days later; asymptomatic, who never develop symptoms; and post-symptomatic, who get sick and recover but remain contagious. The Singapore and China studies focused on pre-symptomatic infections.It remains unclear how many new infections are caused by each type of potential spreader, said Meyers, who was not involved in the Singapore study but was part of the earlier one focused on China.CDC officials say they have been researching asymptomatic and pre-symptomatic infections, but the studies are not complete.In an interview Tuesday with a radio station in Atlanta, CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield cited an estimate that 25% of infected people may be asymptomatic. It was not clear what that estimate was based on, or if it included people who were pre-symptomatic or post-symptomatic. The AP requested more information from the CDC, but the agency did not provide those details.Redfield's comment was in response to a question about whether the agency is going to recommend that people who seem healthy wear masks or face coverings when they go out. He said the agency is reviewing its guidance, looking at research in Singapore, China and other places in making that decision.California Gov. Gavin Newsom this week said he planned to announce new state guidelines on wearing masks.Wearing scarves or bandanas over noses and mouths is “not necessarily going to protect you, but if you are carrying the disease, it may reduce the amount you transmit,” said Carl Bergstrom, a University of Washington evolutionary biologist who studies emerging infectious diseases.In the initial months of the pandemic, health officials based their response on the belief that most of the spread came from people who were sneezing or coughing droplets that contained the virus.Another kind of coronavirus caused the deadly severe acute respiratory syndrome, or SARS, which was first identified in Asia in 2003 and caused a frightening but relatively short-lived international outbreak that never spread as widely as the new virus.Although some asymptomatic infections were discovered, none were found to have spread the disease. Because symptomatic people were the spreaders, health officials could focus on them to see an outbreak happening and could better isolate infected people and stop the spread.“It was much, much easier” to contain, Bergstrom said. With the new coronavirus, “we clearly have asymptomatic and pre-symptomatic transmission,” he added.—-The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.Mike Stobbe, The Associated Press

  • B.C. health officials 'considering' widespread mask use as COVID-19 cases rise
    News
    CBC

    B.C. health officials 'considering' widespread mask use as COVID-19 cases rise

    As the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases soar, B.C. health officials are starting to consider whether the wider use of face masks could curb the spread.Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry has so far recommended against widespread community use. That's consistent with advice given by the World Health Organization, the Government of Canada and the nation's chief public health officer Dr. Theresa Tam: Unless you are exhibiting symptoms, you don't need to wear a face mask.Henry also warned that wearing a mask improperly could lead people to fiddle with it and contaminate it, especially if they do not wash their hands before removing and donning the mask.But the stance against face masks softened Wednesday when Henry said her team is now looking into community use."Obviously, this is something we've been considering as well," she said at her daily press conference Wednesday. Henry said masks might have some benefit for people who don't have any symptoms."The use of non-medical masks ... may reduce, in some cases, the touching of your face [and] they can have some benefit in keeping your droplets in," she said."But we need to be careful ... what is not proven is that they provide you with any protection. That's the really critical part."Lack of consensusThere is currently no global consensus on whether a widespread use of face masks would slow down the spread of COVID-19. But European countries like Austria and Czech Republic are now making it mandatory to wear masks. And the practice is common in several East Asian countries that have seen some success in keeping transmission low.Benjamin Cowling, professor of infectious disease epidemiology at the University of Hong Kong, says there is evidence that face masks are just as effective as hand hygiene in preventing the spread of respiratory viruses.And while physical distancing appears to be most effective in curtailing the spread of COVID-19, "it would make sense that if everybody was wearing face masks, there would be less chance of transmission to occur than if people are not wearing masks," Cowling said."There is definite recognition that some infected persons have been able to spread infection before their symptoms appear. So if everybody wears a face mask, it also reduces the chance that if you're infected, you're going to spread infection to other people."Reserving limited supplyHenry maintains that B.C.'s health-care workers are a priority to receive the province's limited supply of masks. After hearing that health-care workers are facing a shortage of personal protective equipment, Vancouver dentist Patrick Wu says he and other volunteers started collecting face masks and other supplies to donate to local hospitals.But while he agrees health-care workers have the most urgent need for masks, Wu also makes sure to wear one when he is in a public space.Wu, who was born in Taiwan and grew up in Vancouver, says people in other Asian countries also do the same."During this pandemic, we're all fearful of the airborne disease, so [we believe] wearing a mask gives us some protection," he said.

  • Trudeau defends new flights bringing Canadians home from across the globe
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Trudeau defends new flights bringing Canadians home from across the globe

    OTTAWA — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says Canadians being flown home from abroad must subject themselves to "rigorous" and mandatory 14-day self-isolation to keep their fellow citizens safe.Trudeau says Canadians must "look out for each other," but they have a duty not to infect others, especially health care workers."The public health case is that if people who return properly and rigorously self-isolate, then we are not significantly increasing the risk to everyone else," the prime minister said during his daily briefing at his Rideau Cottage residence.Trudeau spoke as the government announced today that six planes carrying Canadians stranded in Africa and Europe are to touch down today in the effort to repatriate travellers stranded by COVID-19.Global Affairs Canada says the planes will arrive from Algeria, Ecuador, Senegal, Democratic Republic of Congo, Hungary and Spain.The department says the government is planning more flights from Ethiopia, Burkina Faso, Cote d'Ivoire, Peru, Algeria, Poland and Pakistan in the coming days.Plans are also being made for several fights from India, starting on April 4 and continuing for the next four days until April 7.The government is reiterating that not all Canadians stranded abroad will be able to come back to Canada, and that those returning will be subjected to mandatory self-isolation.Trudeau said the government wants to see Canadians come home, "but we also very much expect and demand that they keep themselves and their neighbours safe by self-isolating in rigorous conditions for two weeks as soon as they get home."We would much rather have people home than have them stranded elsewhere around the world where things are getting — you know — worse."Speaking in French, Trudeau said the government was "implementing strict and rigorous measures" so the people who come home do not endanger other Canadians, including their neighbours and health care workers.The government says it has approved 449 loans worth $1.4 million under its emergency program for Canadians abroad and is processing another 900 loan applications.This report by The Canadian Press was first published April 1, 2020.Mike Blanchfield, The Canadian Press

  • 'A battlefield behind your home': Deaths mount in New York
    News
    The Canadian Press

    'A battlefield behind your home': Deaths mount in New York

    New York rushed to bring in an army of medical volunteers Wednesday as the statewide death toll from the coronavirus doubled in 72 hours to more than 1,900 and the wail of ambulances in the otherwise eerily quiet streets of the city became the heartbreaking soundtrack of the crisis.As hot spots flared around the U.S. in places like New Orleans and Southern California, the nation's biggest city was the hardest hit of them all, with bodies loaded onto refrigerated morgue trucks by gurney and forklift outside overwhelmed hospitals, in full view of passing motorists.”It’s like a battlefield behind your home," said 33-year-old Emma Sorza, who could hear the sirens from severely swamped Elmhurst Hospital in Queens.And the worst is yet to come.“How does it end? And people want answers," New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said. "I want answers. The answer is nobody knows for sure.”President Donald Trump acknowledged that the federal stockpile is nearly depleted of personal protective equipment used by doctors and nurses and warned of trying times to come.“Difficult days are ahead for our nation," he said. “We're going to have a couple of weeks, starting pretty much now, but especially a few days from now that are going to be horrific.”Scientists offered more evidence Wednesday that the coronavirus can be spread by seemingly healthy people who show no clear symptoms, leading the U.S. government to issue new guidance warning that anyone exposed to the disease can be considered a potential carrier.Stocks tumbled on Wall Street and markets around the world, a day after the White House warned Americans to brace for 100,000 to 240,000 deaths projected in the U.S. before the crisis is over. The Dow Jones Industrial Average lost more than 970 points, or over 4%.A new report Wednesday from the United Nations said the global economy could shrink by almost 1% this year instead of growing at a projected 2.5%.Under growing pressure, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis belatedly joined his counterparts in more than 30 states in issuing a statewide stay-home order. The governors of Pennsylvania, Nevada and Mississippi took similar steps.Trump said his administration has agreed to ship out 1,000 breathing machines vital for treating severe cases of COVID-19. He said the U.S. government has kept close hold on its stockpile of nearly 10,000 ventilators so they can be deployed quickly to states in need.Meanwhile, European nations facing extraordinary demand for intensive-care beds are putting up makeshift hospitals, unsure whether they will find enough healthy medical staff to run them. London is days away from unveiling a 4,000-bed temporary hospital built in a huge convention centre.In a remarkable turnabout, rich economies where virus cases have exploded are welcoming help from less wealthy ones. Russia sent medical equipment and masks to the United States. Cuba supplied doctors to France. Turkey dispatched protective gear and disinfectant to Italy and Spain.Worldwide, more than 900,000 people have been infected and over 45,000 have died, according to a tally kept by Johns Hopkins University, though the real figures are believed to be much higher because of testing shortages, differences in counting the dead and large numbers of mild cases that have gone unreported.The U.S. recorded about 210,000 infections and about 4,800 deaths, with New York City accounting for about 1 out of 4 dead.More than 80,000 people have volunteered as medical reinforcements in New York, including recent retirees, health care professionals taking a break from their regular jobs and people between gigs.The few who have hit the ground already found a hospital system being driven to the breaking point.“It’s hard when you lose patients. It’s hard when you have to tell the family members: ‘I’m sorry, but we did everything that we could,’” said nurse Katherine Ramos of Cape Coral, Florida, who has been working at New York Presbyterian Hospital. "It’s even harder when we really don’t have the time to mourn, the time to talk about this.”To ease the crushing caseload, the city's paramedics have been told they shouldn’t take fatal heart attack victims to hospitals to have them pronounced dead. Patients have been transferred to the Albany area. A Navy hospital ship has docked in New York, the mammoth Javits Convention Center has been turned into a hospital, and the tennis centre that hosts the U.S. Open is being converted to one, too.On near-lockdown, the normally bustling streets in the city of 8.6 million are empty, and sirens are no longer easily ignored as just urban background noise.“After 9-11, I remember we actually wanted to hear the sound of ambulances on our quiet streets because that meant there were survivors, but we didn't hear those sounds, and it was heartbreaking. Today, I hear an ambulance on my strangely quiet street and my heart breaks, too,” said 61-year-old Meg Gifford, a former Wall Streeter who lives on Manhattan's Upper East Side.Nearly 6,200 New York City police officers, or one-sixth of the department, were out sick Wednesday, including about 4,800 who reported flu-like systems, though it was not clear how many had the virus.Cuomo said projections suggest the crisis in New York will peak at the end of April, with a high death rate continuing through July.“Let's co-operate to address that in New York because it's going to be in your town tomorrow," he warned. "If we learn how to do it right here — or learn how to do it the best we can, because there is no right, it's only the best we can — then we can work co-operatively all across this country.”In Southern California, officials reported that at least 51 residents and six staff members at a nursing home east of Los Angeles have been infected and two have died. Mayor Eric Garcetti warned residents of the nation's second-largest city to wear non-medical-grade masks whenever they go outside.The number of dead topped 270 in Louisiana, Grand Canyon National Park closed to visitors indefinitely, and Florida was locked in a standoff over whether two cruise ships with sick and dead passengers may dock in the state.Even as the virus appears to have slowed its growth in overwhelmed Italy and in China, where it first emerged, hospitals on the Continent are buckling under the load."We don't have enough masks, enough protective equipment, and by the end of the week we might be in need of more medication too,” said Paris emergency worker Christophe Prudhomme.Spain reported a record 864 deaths in one day, for a total of more than 9,000, while France registered an unprecedented 509 and more than 4,000 in all. In Italy, with over 13,000 dead, the most of any country, morgues overflowed with bodies, caskets piled up in churches and doctors were forced to decide which desperately ill patients would get breathing machines.England's Wimbledon tennis tournament was cancelled for the first time since World War II.India’s highest court ordered news media and social media sites to carry the government’s “official version” of developments, echoing actions taken in other countries to curb independent reporting.Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte threatened to order law enforcement to shoot troublemakers and stop massive food and cash aid if there are riots and people defy a lockdown imposed on millions. Duterte, who has been condemned for a brutal anti-drug crackdown that left thousands of mostly poor suspects dead, also said he would ask police to punish people who attack health workers with toxic chemicals by dousing the offenders with the substance or forcing them to drink it.The strain facing some of the world's best health care systems has been aggravated by hospital budget cuts over the past decade in Italy, Spain, France and Britain. They have called in medical students, retired doctors and even laid-off flight attendants with first aid training.The staffing shortage has been worsened by the high numbers of infected personnel. In Italy alone, nearly 10,000 medical workers have contracted the virus and more than 60 doctors have died.For most people, the coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough. But for others, especially older adults and people with health problems, it can cause severe symptoms like pneumonia.___Charlton reported from Paris. Sherman reported from Washington. Associated Press writers around the world contributed, including Joseph Wilson in Barcelona; Danica Kirka and Jill Lawless in London; Frank Jordans in Berlin; Karen Matthews in New York; and Nick Perry in Wellington, New Zealand.___Follow AP news coverage of the coronavirus pandemic at https://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreakRobert Bumsted, Angela Charlton And Mark Sherman, The Associated Press

  • Ottawa 'likely did not have enough' protective gear stockpiled: Hajdu
    News
    CBC

    Ottawa 'likely did not have enough' protective gear stockpiled: Hajdu

    Federal Health Minister Patty Hajdu said today Ottawa "likely did not have enough" personal protective gear in the national stockpile heading into the COVID-19 pandemic."To your question about whether we had enough — no, we likely did not have enough. I think federal governments for decades have been under-funding things like public health preparedness," she said during a news conference in Ottawa Wednesday."I would say that, obviously, governments all across the world are in the same exact situation."Her statement marks a shift in tone within the federal government. As recently as last week, Trudeau said he could "assure everyone that the federal stockpiles have been sufficient to meet the needs of the provinces until this point."Hajdu said she didn't have exact numbers on how large the stockpile is.WATCH: 'We likely did not have enough,' Hajdu"The numbers change, as you can imagine, day to day as we dispense equipment across the country," she told reporters.The Trudeau government announced yesterday that it will spend up to $2 billion to procure personal protective equipment, a measure that came amid growing questions about Canada's preparedness for a pandemic.Health care workers across the country have been raising alarms about the lack of N95 masks, with some hospitals and workers saying they have been rationing supplies while they wait for stocks to be replenished.On the same day that Public Services and Procurement Minister Anita Anand said the federal government is "aggressively buying in bulk from all available suppliers and distributors," Quebec Premier François Legault warned that his province was just days away from running out of protective supplies."It is an extremely competitive space right now for personal protective equipment. We are pulling out all of the stops," said Hajdu."I have heard those stories myself from frontline workers, I know provinces and territories are developing different sets of rules for frontline workers around the disbursement and use of personal protective equipment, but I will tell you that we will not stop this work to get the PPE that we need."Guillaume Laverdure is the president of Medicom, one of the companies that has been contracted by the federal government to provide face masks. He said the problem of stockpiling is an ongoing issue."It's a trend we're seeing in a lot of countries in the world where at the end of a pandemic, there's an appetite to stockpile but then, when there is no further pandemic, for budgetary reasons or other constraints like that, the stockpile is progressively disappearing and is not replenished," he said.In the short term, Laverdure said, his company will begin shipping out all the masks they have in stock — including supplies from three factories in China which reopened after being requisitioned by the government there.In the longer term, he said, it's looking at opening a new factory to manufacture the product here in Canada."It's a highly regulated product and the reason it's highly regulated is because it has to have a very stringent protection characteristic to make sure we protect the health care professional and the patient," he said."It is a highly technical product, so not everybody can manufacture overnight."Health care system will be overwhelmed: Tam Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam said today the amount of medical supplies needed to cope with the pandemic depends on the actions Canadians take now to physically isolate themselves and slow the spread of the virus."The really difficult message, I think, to Canadians is that on a whole range of these scenarios, this health system isn't well-designed to cope with it if we don't do something about it now," she said when asked about best- and worst-case scenarios for Canada."Any planning scenario has us potentially overwhelming our health care system."The Public Health Agency of Canada serves a national coordination role in planning and preparing for health emergencies, and can do bulk purchasing on the provinces' behalf — but Tam has said the responsibility for ensuring those inventories are adequate lies with the provinces.WATCH: Hajdu tells Canadians if 'we all stopped moving for two weeks' the virus would dieAt the end of February, before the virus was named a pandemic by the World Health Organization, Tam said that while the federal government has a stockpile of some medical supplies, it's normally reserved for rare, "high-impact" biological or radiological events.She said in those cases, the federal government can top up provincial and territorial supplies in the event they run short.A 2011 audit of the National Emergency Stockpile System found that some of what was in the stockpile was out of date. A spokesperson for the Public Health Agency of Canada said that since then, the system has evolved to "better align with the ever-changing risk environment and is investing in strategic assets.""There has been increased engagement with provincial and territorial partners and other stakeholders to increase awareness of NESS capabilities," said PHAC's Tammy Jarbeau in a statement to CBC.Hajdu said all governments might want to consider reinvesting in public health and preparedness on the other end of this pandemic."But I will tell you that the situation right now is such that our government has the money, we have the will, we have the workforce and everybody's focus is firmly on getting PPE and we will continue to fight for Canada's shares in that available stock as it comes online," she said.

  • Italy coronavirus death rate slows but studies suggest true tally higher
    News
    Reuters

    Italy coronavirus death rate slows but studies suggest true tally higher

    Italy's daily death toll from coronavirus on Wednesday was the lowest for six days, authorities said, but the overall number of new infections grew and the government extended a national lockdown until at least the middle of April. The Civil Protection Agency said 727 people had died over the last 24 hours, down from 837 the day before, bringing total fatalities from the world's deadliest outbreak of the viral pandemic to 13,155. Italy accounts for around 30% of all global deaths from the highly infectious respiratory illness, and two new studies suggested its true death toll could be significantly higher.

  • Virus forces Wimbledon cancellation for 1st time since WWII
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Virus forces Wimbledon cancellation for 1st time since WWII

    For the first time in its nearly century-and-a-half history, Wimbledon was cancelled for a reason other than war, scrapped in 2020 on Wednesday because of the coronavirus pandemic.With Britain under a nationwide lockdown, the All England Club announced its decision to call off its storied two-week grass-court tennis tournament, something that hadn't happened to the sport's oldest Grand Slam event in 75 years."It has weighed heavily on our minds that the staging of The Championships has only been interrupted previously by World Wars," club chairman Ian Hewitt said, “but, following thorough and extensive consideration of all scenarios, we believe that it is a measure of this global crisis that it is ultimately the right decision to cancel this year's Championships, and instead concentrate on how we can use the breadth of Wimbledon's resources to help those in our local communities and beyond."Wimbledon was scheduled to be played on the outskirts of London from June 29 to July 12. Instead, the next edition of the tournament will be June 28 to July 11, 2021.Eight-time Wimbledon champion Roger Federer surely spoke for many tennis players, officials and fans with a one-word message on Twitter: “Devastated.”Also Wednesday, the ATP and WTA announced that the men's and women's professional tours would be suspended until at least July 13, bringing the number of elite tennis tournaments affected by the new coronavirus since early March to more than 30. The top tours already had been on hold through June 7. Lower-level events on the Challenger Tour and ITF World Tennis Tour also are called off for the first two weeks of July now.Wimbledon first was held in 1877 and has been contested every year since, with the exception of two stretches: from 1915-18 because of World War I, and from 1940-45 because of World War II.Now the prestigious tournament — known for its carefully manicured grass, its Royal Box at Centre Court, its rules about wearing white, its strawberries and cream and, alas, its rain delays — joins the growing list of major sports events called off in 2020 because of the COVID-19 outbreak.That includes the Tokyo Olympics — which have been pushed back 12 months — and the NCAA men's and women's college basketball tournaments.Wimbledon is the first Grand Slam tournament wiped out because of the coronavirus; the start of the French Open was postponed from late May to late September.Shortly after the news came from Wimbledon, the U.S. Tennis Association issued a statement saying it “still plans to host the U.S. Open as scheduled,” from Aug. 31 to Sept. 13 in New York.As of now, the French Open is set to begin six days after the men's final at Flushing Meadows, where a facility housing indoor practice courts is now a temporary 350-bed hospital and Louis Armstrong Stadium is being used to prepare 25,000 meal packages per day for patients, workers, volunteers and schoolchildren in the city.Wednesday's decision by the All England Club means Novak Djokovic and Simona Halep will not get a chance to defend their Wimbledon titles from 2019.“We are going through something bigger than tennis and Wimbledon will be back!” Halep wrote on social media. “And it means I have even longer to look forward to defending my title.”Serena Williams retweeted the club's message about the cancellation and wrote: “I'm Shooked.”The move takes away what might have been one of Federer's best chances to try to add to his men's-record 20 Grand Slam titles. Federer, who turns 39 in August, is recovering from knee surgery and planned to return in time for the European grass-court circuit that now has been erased from the calendar.In a statement last week, the All England Club said that postponing the two-week event would not come "without significant risk and difficulty" because of the grass surface that is affected by weather conditions. The club also said then that it had ruled out "playing behind closed doors" without spectators.Hundreds of thousands of people have caught COVID-19 around the globe, and tens of thousands have died. For most people, the new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, which can include fever and cough, but also milder cases of pneumonia, sometimes requiring hospitalization.The All England Club said it would work to help with the emergency response to the pandemic, including distributing medical equipment and food and offering the use of their facilities in other ways.Regular day-to-day life has come to a halt in many ways in many parts of the world in recent weeks, and sports has reflected that.The NBA, NHL and Major League Baseball are on hold indefinitely; the Kentucky Derby and Indianapolis 500 were pushed back several months until September; England's Premier League and other club soccer competitions are currently suspended; and the European soccer championship — scheduled to end in London on the same day as the Wimbledon men's final — was postponed from 2020 to 2021."I have been fortunate to go to Wimbledon every year since 1961, and I am certainly going to miss it this year," said Billie Jean King, who won a total of 20 trophies at the All England Club — six for singles, 10 for women's doubles, four for mixed doubles. “Right now, we need to make sure we are taking good care of ourselves and our loved ones. These are challenging times for all of us and now is the time for us to do what is right for our world and what works for our sport.”___Follow Howard Fendrich on Twitter at https://twitter.com/HowardFendrich___More AP Tennis coverage: https://www.apnews.com/apf-Tennis and https://twitter.com/AP_SportsHoward Fendrich, The Associated Press

  • News
    CBC

    RCMP seek witnesses to December apartment flooding in Inuvik

    Police in Inuvik, N.W.T., are appealing for the public's help in identifying the individuals who shut off gas to an apartment building last December and caused "extensive damage" in the process.According to a release on the "alleged mischief incident" from the RCMP, on the morning of Dec. 21, police came across "a large volume of water" coming from an apartment building … [and] flooding the road and sidewalk."A water pipe in an unidentified building on Inuvik's Mackenzie Road had frozen and burst, the release says. The building's owner later told police the gas line providing heat had been shut off sometime between Dec. 19 and 20.A release from the RCMP says the police force has been looking into the incident since then and "the investigation has reached the stage of Inuvik RCMP requesting public assistance."The "contents of surveillance cameras in the area" produced "no leads or suspects," the release says.The release asks anyone who witnessed suspicious activity in the area of Mackenzie Road and Kingmingya Road, between Dec. 19 and 20, to contact Inuvik RCMP at 777-1111.Anonymous tips can be left with Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

  • Review: James Elkington's melancholy the stuff for shut-ins
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Review: James Elkington's melancholy the stuff for shut-ins

    James Elkington, "Ever-Roving Eye" (Paradise of Bachelors)With his "Ever-Roving Eye," James Elkington sings about wolves in the womb, the sincerity of hyenas and the clock running out — a cradle to grave perspective, in other words.The album is a follow-up to the Chicago-based Englishman's 2017 debut and was recorded in 2018, but it inadvertently provides a fitting soundtrack to the current moment of isolation and confinement. Elkington sings in an indoor voice pitched low, reinforcing the reflective melancholy of his lyrics.“You’ll be underground in no uncertain terms, and dozing with the worms," he sings on the opener “Nowhere Time.” "There’s a master plan somebody understands, and I wish that one was me.”Elkington's guitar chops are such that he has done session work for Richard Thompson, among others, and his intricate acoustic fingerpicking underpins these sturdy songs, as do subtle melodies built to last. Cello, violin and woodwinds provide lovely ornamentation on occasion.The set echoes the British folk of 1968, or perhaps 1668, and will appeal in particular to music fans of a certain age who, when they hear the name Drake, think of Nick. Just the stuff for shut-ins, that is.Steven Wine, The Associated Press

  • 'Animal Crossing: New Horizons' Gives Space For Normalcy, Peace And Quiet
    News
    HuffPost Canada

    'Animal Crossing: New Horizons' Gives Space For Normalcy, Peace And Quiet

    Debuting in the midst of the pandemic, “Animal Crossing: New Horizons” has been a welcome escape.

  • News
    CBC

    'I want to go home:' Sask. couple expecting to get on flight out of Peru after COVID-19 lockdown

    After weeks of stress and countless phone calls, Russell Edwards and Heather Hind-Hluchaniuk are finally scheduled to fly home.The couple from Melfort and St. Brieux, Sask. travelled to Peru for a holiday earlier this month, but within days of their arrival, the country's president closed its borders and enacted a strict curfew.However, after negotiations, the country agreed to allow Air Canada to come into the country and fly out hundreds of trapped Canadians."It's kind of a turn for the better," said Hind-Hluchaniuk on Wednesday morning. "I want to go home." Their original flight home on April 20 was cancelled. After that, the couple launched into weeks of calling Air Canada, the Canadian Embassy and the travel agency, with little to no success.This weekend, the couple received a notice from the embassy that rescue flights would be taking people out of the country on April 1 and 2.She said it was incredibly welcome news."I, myself, just want to see my kids," she said. "Which is still another two weeks because we have to go into mandatory quarantine again back home. But at least I will be able to phone them easily."The couple were mainly confined to their rental suite as police patrolled outside, enforcing the quarantine.Hind-Hluchaniuk and Edwards will board a plane at Lima's military base before leaving. The city's main airport has been closed down for weeks.The federal government said it was trying to bring Canadians staying outside of Lima in the cities of Cusco and Iquitos to the airport to get people out of the country.

  • Trump warns Iran against possible 'sneak attack' on U.S. in Iraq
    News
    Reuters

    Trump warns Iran against possible 'sneak attack' on U.S. in Iraq

    U.S. President Donald Trump said on Wednesday that Iran or its proxies planned a sneak attack on U.S. targets in Iraq, and warned they would pay a "very heavy price" but gave no details. It was not immediately clear what information Trump was referring to in his tweet, which was posted after he was scheduled to have a 12 p.m. ET (1600 GMT) intelligence briefing.

  • News
    CBC

    Help available for Calgary university students suffering financially due to COVID-19

    Student associations at Calgary universities say they're getting more questions about emergency funding and support for students impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.And it's expected the need will only grow.Jessica Revington, president of the Students' Union at the University of Calgary, says there's been a slight increase in students looking for financial support compared with what's usual."But we do anticipate that this number will increase significantly as the financial impact of COVID-19 becomes apparent," she said.She says students can apply for up to $1,500 through the Students' Union Hardship Fund to cover essentials like rent, tuition and food."Over the past couple of weeks, our main focus has been ensuring that students get the information that they need when they need it. So we've been trying different ways on social media to get in touch with students providing them with resources and links to various community support that students can reach out to during this time," she said.The university says it's also in the process of setting up a dedicated fund for students who need emergency funding during the COVID-19 crisis.The Graduate Students' Association also has emergency funding available.Shereen Samuels, student services director for the Students' Association of Mount Royal University, says they're seeing lots of demand for a new food hamper program that was launched March 18 in response to COVID-19.In the first week, they gave away seven hampers, in the second week 25, and on Monday of this week alone they gave away 19."So we're definitely seeing increasing usage of that program," she said.The association also has a short-term loan program where students can access up to $300 at a time.Student groups say students can find out what supports are available by going online, or calling their offices.

  • Quebec bans non-essential travel within Laurentians, Lanaudière, Outaouais regions and to La Tuque
    News
    CBC

    Quebec bans non-essential travel within Laurentians, Lanaudière, Outaouais regions and to La Tuque

    Quebec announced additional travel restrictions within the province on Wednesday in attempt to stop the spread of COVID-19.The latest measure covers travel throughout the Outaouais region near Ottawa and between regional county municipalities in the Laurentians and the Lanaudière regions, as well as travel to La Tuque, in the Mauricie region. The government decree went into effect at noon, on April 1.The regional county municipalities affected are Antoine-Labelle and Argenteuil in the Laurentians. In the Lanaudière,  Autray, Joliette, Matawinie and Montcalm fall under the non-essential travel ban.On highways leading to other regions deemed "vulnerable," police have set up roadblocks which will remain as long as the emergency public health provisions are in place. Public health authorities have said with these latest measures, provincial police on patrol will limit non-essential travel "randomly."Pierre Winner, the general manager of the MRC of Matawinie, said that means temporary road blocks will be in place but will likely change locations from one day to the next."It's like during Christmas time when they check to see if you have been drinking — it won't always be the same days, the same time, in the same place," Winner said.Unless people are headed to a medical appointment, getting food, providing care or delivering goods to someone who can't go out, they will be asked to return home.Winner said regional officials are also working on a plan to ensure people who require public transportation for medical reasons, for example, will be able to get to their appointments.Shutting down travel 'to the north', Premier saysDuring his daily briefing Wednesday, Premier François Legault said even though motorists may not encounter roadblocks, he is urging Quebecers to respect the guidelines."We must continue to follow our three priorities — don't go out unless it's necessary; if you do go out, keep your distances, and when you come home, wash your hands," Legault said. "That's how we will save lives."The latest announcement of travel restrictions follows last week's declaration of eight "vulnerable regions" in Quebec, which saw police checkpoints erected Saturday to try to curb all non-essential travel to more isolated parts of the province.Legault said there is still "no plan to close off the island of Montreal." He said too many outlying suburbs and neighbouring cities would be impacted by such a measure.But by closing down routes that run from the city to the northerly regions of Lanaudière and Laurentians, "we want to eliminate travel between the north and the south."In Saguenay, motorists are being stopped at the entrance to the Laurentides Wildlife Reserve.Provincial police spokesperson Bruno Cormier said most people are collaborating."Of course, some are disappointed because they would have liked to continue their journey, but they understand there are rules they have to follow," Cormier said.

  • Talented Indian bread makers have a little factory behind restaurant
    Rumble

    Talented Indian bread makers have a little factory behind restaurant

    There is a restaurant on the main highway between Agra and Jaipur where you can get delicious food and naan bread that tastes like it just came off the hot coals minutes before it was on your table. And there's a very good reason that it tastes so fresh. That's because it did just come off the coals. In a quiet little corner, behind the restaurant, this couple are working away in a tiny bakery that consists of a small wood fire and a hot plate. They are shaded by a small sheet of tin as they sit on mats and stools. This smiling lady works the dough with practiced hands that move quickly and gracefully to form a small lump. She then rolls the dough flat with a small rolling pin before placing it on a hot stone over a wood fire for a few minutes. Once it has become firm, she flips it directly onto the fire that is tended by her partner. She begins making another as he turns the naan several times while it rises and browns on the coals. After the bread has cooked on the fire for a few minutes, he places it in a metal pot. Within moments, a waiter will show up and take the bread, still steaming, to a nearby table. To watch the precision and speed with which these two work is amazing. It is no wonder their tiny operation is able to keep up with the appetites of the hungry patrons. When asked about the process, this lady happily explained her recipe and her technique. They were even willing to demonstrate their craft more slowly so that it could be filmed. It seemed obvious that they were happy in their work and took pride in their product. A suitable tip was left to thank them for their time and of course, for the delicious bread.

  • 'Signs of hope:' Scientists say ocean ecosystems can be restored within 30 years
    News
    The Canadian Press

    'Signs of hope:' Scientists say ocean ecosystems can be restored within 30 years

    We've saved the whales, at least some of them.Now, scientists say, we have a chance to save the rest of the life in oceans by expanding what's already happening around the globe."A lot of us have chronicled ocean depletion over the years," said Boris Worm, a marine ecologist at Dalhousie University in Halifax and a co-author of a paper published Wednesday in Nature."A lot of us, recently, have seen signs of hope. Not to say that the world is getting better wholesale. But there are now hundreds and hundreds of examples that when we do something, the ocean displays remarkable resilience."Worm and his 14 international co-writers take care to list the formidable challenges that the world's oceans face.At least one-third of fish stocks are over-harvested. A similar fraction of crucial marine habitat has been lost.The seas continue to get warmer, more acidic, more oxygen-deprived and more polluted. Up to 12 million tonnes of plastic is added every year.But the paper concludes local and regional conservation efforts are adding up.Commercial fishing pressure is starting to decline. Controls on fertilizer and sewage dumping instituted years ago are paying off.In 2000, less than one per cent of the Earth's oceans had some form of legal protection. Now the figure is almost eight per cent — double that in Canada.Nearly half of 124 marine mammal species are increasing, some significantly. The proportion of fish stocks that are fished sustainably increased to 68 per cent in 2012 from 60 per cent in 2000.Species such as humpback whales have been restored to their historic baseline.Particularly heartening is the rebirth of what Worm calls "marine infrastructure" — habitats such as mangrove swamps, kelp forests and seagrass beds that host much undersea life as well as provide important flood protection for coastal communities. "Even habitat loss is less prevalent than it was before." Worm said hundreds of examples worldwide prove that when governments, industry and communities decide to improve the oceans, they're successful."We see local efforts that lead to local improvements. We have global examples as well, species that are crossing international boundaries, that were close to extinction, that have rebounded — in some cases, manyfold."Elephant seals, for example, are a thousand times more abundant than they once were.Worm and his co-authors conclude that despite all the justified concern over the seas, their ecosystems could be substantially rebuilt by 2050. That's if — and it's a big if — governments and societies take the willingness they've already shown to address problems and focus it on a big issue: climate change."We need to do a bunch of things we've been doing all along. But we also have to really deal with climate change."It would cost the world up to about $28 billion a year to protect enough ocean to have an impact on half of it, the paper concludes. It says the economic return in fisheries and other industries such as ecotourism would be about 10 dollars for every one invested."This is absolutely doable," Worm said."What we really hope is that this provides some good news and more than a glimmer of hope at a time when there's a lot of despair about facing our global challenges."There's reason to be concerned. But there's literally hundreds and hundreds of examples of ocean recovery. Let's scale up what we have done locally to a global level."This report by The Canadian Press was first published April 1, 2020Bob Weber, The Canadian Press

  • Fredericton cab driver tests positive for COVID-19
    News
    CBC

    Fredericton cab driver tests positive for COVID-19

    A driver with Fredericton's Checker Cab company has tested positive for COVID-19, according to co-owner George Youssef.Youssef said the driver started to show symptoms after picking up a passenger at the Fredericton Airport who was returning from Punta Cana on a Sunwing flight in March.He said the driver is "high up in age."On March 27, Dr. Jennifer Russell identified a confirmed case COVID-19 on Sunwing flight 169 from Punta Cana to Fredericton on March 18.Youssef said he got a call from public health officials on Saturday, March 30, confirming the driver's test came back positive."Ninety-five per cent of the time we are the ones that pick people up at the airport," said Youssef.Public Health is aware of the case, and also confirms the driver was in contact with a traveller he picked up at the airport. "Public Health has been working with the cab company to identify anyone who had been in close contact with the driver," spokesperson Anne Mooers said in an emailed statement.'If you haven't been contacted, you're fine'Youssef said the driver "only drove that one day," but it's unclear whether that was one day with symptoms, or one day since the beginning of the outbreak.COVID-19 has an incubation period of 1 to 14 days, meaning a person can be an asymptomatic carrier and not know it.However, Youssef is confident all passengers in the man's car have been traced and contacted through the company's computerized system."If you haven't been contacted, you're fine," he said. "There weren't very many, I don't know exactly how many." Youssef said the cab company has been implementing precautionary measures for the past three weeks, including masks, frequent sanitizing of surfaces and having passengers sit in the back seat only. He said drivers are also not allowed to come into the dispatch building, to limit the possible spread to other drivers. Youssef said he doesn't have concerns about his other drivers in his 55-vehicle fleet, but if anyone of them is not feeling well, they are asked to stay home. The same goes for passengers. Youssef said any passenger who has had a COVID-19 test done or is presenting any symptoms will not be allowed in a Checker cab. "I'm not worried about the passengers, I'm worried about the driver. If my driver is well, he's going to drive that car," said Youssef. "But if that driver is ill, there wouldn't be a car and there would be no worry about the passenger getting sick."The driver is my most important asset."

  • Canada's COVID-19 infections skew younger than anticipated
    News
    Yahoo News Canada

    Canada's COVID-19 infections skew younger than anticipated

    In Canada, 66 per cent of COVID-19 cases are between the ages of 20 and 59, which is younger than forecasts originally suggested.

  • 'It really lifted my spirits': As COVID-19 shuts down birthday parties, kids get drive-by parades instead
    News
    CBC

    'It really lifted my spirits': As COVID-19 shuts down birthday parties, kids get drive-by parades instead

    Many people celebrating birthdays during the COVID-19 pandemic have had to postpone parties or opt for something more low-key because of physical distancing orders from the B.C. government.But one Cranbrook, B.C., woman is still hoping to make birthdays special by organizing parades for children who are staying home. Melissa Young told Radio West host Sarah Penton she decided to start these parades in her community after her son was having a hard time not being able to celebrate his 12th birthday.Young said anyone who wants to participate in the parades all meet at a specific location in their cars, then they drive off together blasting music and honking their horns while waving at the child celebrating their birthday.Kaylee's Sweet 16Young helped Kaylee Davis celebrate her Sweet 16 this past weekend. Davis said she didn't expect anything and was feeling down after she had to cancel her party but was happy to see the parade."When they passed by it really lifted my spirits, it was so special," David said over the phone.The two have never met in person."It was really cool to be able to brighten her day," Young said. Other paradesYoung said they've also been driving by the local hospital and assisted living homes to lift the spirits of healthcare workers and patients who can't have visitors. It's become so popular, Young said they now have professional lead drivers and help from the RCMP to guide two groups of about 25 drivers each through different sections of town.She said the first night they had three parades and now they're up to ten. Even though it's busy, Young is happy to do it."I just know we'll all get through this as a community."

  • Substitute teachers, in-home care to be provided for kids of essential workers
    News
    CBC

    Substitute teachers, in-home care to be provided for kids of essential workers

    Premier Dwight Ball says the government will provide funding for essential workers to pick a relative or friend to watch their child, but the province will still need to rely on some early childhood educators and substitute teachers."These workers are critical to the operations of their employers and to government during this pandemic," Ball said during Wednesday's COVID-19 briefing.Public health advised the province that care in a home environment is best, Ball said, "Home environment is family, could be a trusted neighbour, could be some friends."The announcement comes a week after regulated early childhood educators expressed concern over what they called strong-arm tactics by government to reopen their daycare spaces for children of essential care workers. The contract provided to regulated centres suggested they would lose provincial funding already promised to shuttered spaces if they refused to reopen their doors.Ball said the province received 800 applications for free child care, and 50 of those will still need care outside of the home."The program will also allow families to avail of an alternate arrangement in a safe, regulated environment with guidance from public health," he said.Ball said child care centres have been contacted, matching families with their current child care providers prior to the COVID-19 closures.'All the options'The Department of Education and Early Childhood Development is working with the Newfoundland and Labrador English School District and the NLTA to utilize classroom space, and bring back substitute teachers to care for school-age children."We are exercising all the options we have available to us," Ball said."Of course, keep in mind, appropriate physical distancing can be maintained if the demand increases.'Families who are able to arrange their own child care will be reimbursed up to $200 per week, per child, upon confirmation from their employers that they are essential employees.Asked what the incentive would be for daycares to reopen, Ball doubled down on previous comments that regulated operators are "already being paid' and that the government is merely asking to work together for essential workers.Looking for an apologySusan Baker, an early childhood educator and advocate, said she and other operators do want to help out, but says the devil is in the details."They're painting the picture that we don't want to stand up and help essential workers, which couldn't be further from the truth," Baker said.The Early Childhood Educators Human Resource Council in St. John's, of which Baker is a member, sent a letter to Premier Dwight Ball, Education and Early Childhood Development Minister Brian Warr, Advanced Education and Skills Minister Christopher Mitchelmore, and Mary Goss-Prowse, a director in the education department., with their concerns.She said Ball's announcement does appear to be a step in the right direction, however, she has not heard from any operators who have been consulted.She said it's still unclear if operators will continue to receive funding to ensure the cost isn't offloaded to parents.Baker said she and other early childhood educators want an apology from the premier over remarks he made during previous briefings.Ball had said health-care professionals would care for child care providers if they were sick, so he hoped early childhood educators would help them in their time of need.Baker said a lot of operators felt the comment was threatening, and was unfair.Read more by CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

  • News
    CBC

    Calgary Transit service will be reduced starting April 6

    Transit service will be reduced in Calgary as ridership plummets and staffing is affected by the pandemic. Starting on April 6, all transit routes will have reduced service, but there will be no routes cut. "We know we need to maintain transit as much as possible, but certainly we're not seeing the ridership," said Tom Sampson, chief of the Calgary Emergency Management Agency."We know these changes are difficult but they're the right thing to do."Russell Davies, manager of Calgary Transit, said ridership has dropped by up to 80 per cent.He said the grace period for low-income and senior travel passes will be extended another month, meaning the March pass will be good through to May. City financesMayor Naheed Nenshi said transit is a critical service, but that the city's finance are strained. "We are losing, early estimates say, $10 and $15 million per week," he said of the city government. He said those constraints don't affect only transit, but will reduce the options the city has when it comes to any kind of property tax relief for Calgarians, many of whom have been hit hard by the pandemic."We're working hard to get a good solution, particularly around property taxes. We have a lot of constraints that the other levels of government don't have," he said, citing the inability to run a deficit. Nenshi said there would be a proposal for discussion at the meeting of council on April 6. "We'll have more news on that relatively soon," he said.

  • Coronavirus outbreak: Trudeau says Canada doesn't need a Defence Production Act
    Global News

    Coronavirus outbreak: Trudeau says Canada doesn't need a Defence Production Act

    Speaking to reporters outside Rideau Cottage in Ottawa, Ontario on Wednesday, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said that unlike the United States, where President Trump is using the powers of the Defence Production Act (DPA) to compel manufacturers to produce emergency medical supplies, Trudeau says similar action is not needed in Canada because Canadians companies are "putting their hands up."

  • P.E.I. government stepping up COVID-19 screening, enforcement measures at Confederation Bridge
    News
    CBC

    P.E.I. government stepping up COVID-19 screening, enforcement measures at Confederation Bridge

    The government of P.E.I. is heightening COVID-19 screening and enforcement measures at the Confederation Bridge starting Wednesday evening, said Transportation, Infrastructure and Energy Minister Steven Myers."Don't come if it's not essential. You are going to be turned away," he said.Travellers who are not considered to be essential workers, students returning home, essential trade or transportation workers, people returning from off-Island medical appointments or commuting to the Island under compassionate grounds will be turned away. Myers said the new enhanced measures will include two screening protocols.The first will be conducted by law enforcement officials who will discern whether travellers should be turned away or passed through, he said. Once people are identified as essential and have passed through they will undergo a second screening where public health officers will do a health check, he said. 'Strongest measure we've had in place yet'Myers said the new measures will come into effect beginning Wednesday evening and have been implemented to support the chief public health officer's orders. He said New Brunswick will be working to ensure the same enforcement is mirrored on its side of the bridge for those trying to leave P.E.I. "This is the strongest measure we've had in place yet and I think we're going to show people that we're serious about this," Myers said. He also noted that the province is continuing to work to address Islanders' access to liquor stores. He said one liquor store in O'Leary was reopened with limited operating hours Wednesday. He also said the reopening of a location in Souris is planned for Thursday. Both stores will be operating from Monday to Saturday between the hours of 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.At this time, Myers said P.E.I. Cannabis will not be reopening its doors, however it will continue to be available for purchase online. Income supportA new COVID-19 income support fund has been established to help Islanders experiencing a loss of income ahead of the arrival of other federal benefits and will come as a one-time lump sum of $750, said Minister of Economic Growth Matthew MacKay.  Islanders who, as of March 13, have lost their job, had their employment insurance benefits expire, are unable to return to work, have applied for benefits through EI or through the Canada Emergency Response Benefit may be eligible.The funding from the program will be distributed through Skills PEI. MacKay said Islanders can access the application form for the new benefits after 5 p.m. Wednesday, on the government's COVID-19 website. Money provided so farMacKay said the province's Emergency Income Relief Fund has approved 1,000 applications and has provided $850,000 to self-employed Islanders. Through the Emergency Worker Relief Assistance program, designed for Island workers who have had a reduction in hours because of the pandemic, MacKay said 173 applications have been approved to help 880 employees and has provided $150,000. I continue to promise you, you have our support and together we'll get through this. — Matthew MacKay, minister of economic growthThe province's Emergency Working Capital Financing geared toward small businesses has approved 70 loans, totalling $3.1 million, while its employee gift card program has received 1,108 applications from Island employers and 7,643 gift cards have gone out to employees who have been laid off. MacKay noted the province's new Commercial Lease Rent Deferral program has seen 40 inquiries and two applications.He also said the province is looking to roll out a separate fund for students affected by COVID-19 with more details to come over the next day or two.MacKay said Islanders can expect an announcement on summer job applications in the coming days."We know these are tough times but I continue to promise you, you have our support and together we'll get through this," he said.COVID-19: What you need to knowWhat are the symptoms of COVID-19?Common symptoms include: * Fever. * Cough. * Tiredness.But more serious symptoms can develop, including difficulty breathing and pneumonia, which can lead to death.Health Canada has built a self-assessment tool.What should I do if I feel sick?Isolate yourself and call 811. Do not visit an emergency room or urgent care centre to get tested. A health professional at 811 will give you advice and instructions.How can I protect myself? * Wash your hands frequently and thoroughly. * Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. * Clean regularly touched surfaces regularly.More detailed information on the outbreak is available on the federal government's website.More COVID-19 stories from CBC P.E.I.

  • Man charged with 1st-degree murder in death of his own child, parents
    News
    CBC

    Man charged with 1st-degree murder in death of his own child, parents

    Nathaniel K. Carrier has been charged with three counts of first-degree murder after his son and parents were killed in Prince Albert. The 28-year-old is also charged with attempted murder.On Sunday afternoon, Prince Albert police were called to a home and found what has been described by the police chief as a horrific, incomprehensible scene. Officers found three people dead: Denis Carrier and Sandra Henry, both 56 years old, and seven-year-old Bentlee. They found Bentlee's five-year-old sister Kendrah critically injured. She was airlifted to an Edmonton hospital and is now in stable condition, after multiple surgeries.Police confirmed that Nathaniel is the son of the couple who was killed, and the father of the boy and girl victims. None of the charges have been proven in court."We're all still in a world of shock, and just can't believe that someone could be so sick and could do such a brutal crime to their family," said Billy McLennan, a cousin to Sandra who also lives in Prince Albert. "It's just something that you see in movies, that you never think would ever happen."McLennan said he's known Denis and Sandra for decades, having graduated high school with them in 1983. He said the couple were high school sweethearts.He'd most often see her when she was working at the grocery store.  "She always talked about her kids and her grandkids and asked about mine," he said. "She always had that sparkle in her eyes when she talked about them." The crime has left friends and family members in a state of shock and disbelief, grappling with a long list of questions. "How could it happen to someone so close to us? Why did it happen? Why were the kids — like how could someone do this to their mom and dad? How could they do this to their own son and daughter?"McLennan said they can't seem to find the answers. He said he's been telling everyone the same message as people try to cope with this tragedy: "Squeeze your kids a little bit tighter at night." Police reveal more detailed timelinePolice said a family member and a friend discovered the crime scene after going to check on the family's well-being on Sunday.Insp. Craig Mushka said officers responded immediately and quicky determined there had been foul play. Nathaniel also lived at the home, but he was missing and so was the vehicle registered in his dad's name, police said. RCMP located the missing vehicle in La Ronge, Sask., on Sunday but Nathaniel was not with it. "Investigators located Nathaniel in Prince Albert that evening and felt confident that he was no longer a risk to public safety," Mushka said.They determined he was "no longer a threat" and didn't arrest him until Tuesday afternoon. Mushka would not reveal where Nathaniel was from Sunday to Tuesday. Mushka said he expects that information to come out in court.He said police are still trying to determine Nathaniel's actions in La Ronge. Police will not reveal the cause or manner of death, but said the killings likely happened on Saturday. Police chief Jon Bergen previously said that additional mental health supports will be brought in for the officers who responded to the crime scene, because of the horrific nature.Mushka said it's too early to say why this happened, but police will continue to gather evidence.Nathaniel's first court date was Wednesday morning and the matter was adjourned to April 15. Online fundraisers have been started for the family members of the victims to help with medical, travel and funeral expenses.

  • N.B. COVID-19 roundup: State of emergency extended as confirmed cases climb to 81
    News
    CBC

    N.B. COVID-19 roundup: State of emergency extended as confirmed cases climb to 81

    New Brunswick has extended the state of emergency for another two weeks, Premier Blaine Higgs announced on Wednesday, as the COVID-19 outbreak continues, with 11 new confirmed cases, bringing the province's total to 81.Public Safety officers are now monitoring public areas, such as beaches and parks, to ensure people are obeying physical distancing guidelines and not gathering in groups, he said.The province is also putting up barriers in public places "as needed" and deploying security guards and law enforcement officers, Higgs told reporters during the daily update in Fredericton."It is unfortunate this is necessary but gatherings put us all at risk," he said.Fines can range between $292.50 and $10,200."We are willing to do what it takes to protect the safely of all New Brunswickers."If anyone doesn't care about themselves, Higgs urged them to think about their parents or grandparents.Anyone who sees someone breaking the rules, should not confront them and risk a physical altercation, but rather report it by calling 1-844-462-8387, he said.The all-party cabinet committee on COVID-19 and cabinet will review the emergency declaration, issued on March 19, in another two weeks and continue to extend it as needed, the premier said. The law says a declaration can only last for 14 days before it has to be renewed.Here is a roundup of other developments.Health-care workers infected outside workSeven of the province's confirmed COVID-19 cases include health-care workers, chief medical officer of health Dr. Jennifer Russell announced Wednesday.But they contracted the virus outside the health-care setting, she said."While I cannot speak to any of the specific cases, health-care workers like the rest of us could acquire this illness in a variety of ways — some have travelled, some are contacts of cases and some have had contact with others."If they have been in direct contact with the public, that will be made public, said Russell. Otherwise, their close contacts will be notified."This virus doesn't discriminate. We are all vulnerable to it."They have all self-isolated and will not return to work until they are healthy, she added.Russell acknowledged there are concerns about the supply of personal protective equipment for health-care workers."I am confident we have what we need," she said. "But we have to maintain our supplies and use them appropriately."No need for public to wear masksMedical health officer Jennifer Russell is urging the general public not to use N95 masks. They're not necessary for the general public, but essential for health-care workers, she said."As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, it becomes increasingly important that we protect those who are protecting us," said Russell.Doctors, nurses, paramedics, lab technicians and other health-care professionals are "putting themselves in harm's way for all of us and they deserve our profound gratitude."There is a supply of personal protective equipment on its way to New Brunswick from the federal government, she added.Premier Blaine Higgs said he was pleased to hear the federal government will invest $2 billion to produce necessary supplies, including personal protective equipment such as masks, face shields, gowns and hand sanitizer, as well as ventilators and testing kits."We will continue to work closely with the federal government and the other provinces to ensure we have access to these supplies in New Brunswick as the demand increases," he said.11 new cases include 2 people in hospitalThe new cases include:Zone 1, Moncton area: * Two cases between the ages of 20 and 59.Zone 2, Saint John health region. * Three cases between the ages of 40 and 69.Zone 3, Fredericton health region. * Four cases between the ages of 30 and 59.Zone 5, Campbellton health region. * Two cases between the ages of 50 and 69.There are four people hospitalized, including two of the latest cases, but none are in intensive care, said Russell.Fourteen people have now recovered from the viral infection.Of the 81 cases, 43 people travelled outside New Brunswick in the 14 days prior to becoming ill, 22 had close contact with people who had travelled, three are community transmissions and 13 are still under investigation.On Tuesday, Russell said people shouldn't be lulled into complacency when she doesn't report a high increase in cases at her daily briefing and should continue to stay home.40,000 people apply for one-time income benefitDuring Wednesday's news conference, Premier Blaine Higgs said about 40,000 people have applied for the one-time income benefit of $900 for workers or self-employed people who have lost their jobs because of the state of emergency.This program is costing the province about $36 million so far. Passengers on 6th Moncton flight at risk of exposureThe Greater Moncton Romeo LeBlanc International Airport is reporting a sixth flight where passengers are suspected of being at risk of COVID-19 exposure.Air Canada flight 8900 from Montreal arrived at the Moncton airport on March 16 at 10:12 a.m., according to a news release Tuesday.The flight has not been mentioned by medical health officer Jennifer Russell or Premier Blaine Higgs at any of the daily news briefingsThe Greater Moncton Airport Authority said it is continuing to monitor developments of the spread of COVID-19. "The health and wellness of our passengers, visitors, business partners and employees are our top priority."The authority said it is aware of six people who have now tested positive for COVID-19 who passed through the airport, including at least two people from Prince Edward Island.Flights where passengers could've been put at risk include: * Sunwing Flight WG445 arriving to Moncton on March 20 from Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic. * Air Transat Flight TS2653 arriving to Moncton on March 18 from Punta Cana, Dominican Republic. * Air Canada Flight AC7518 arriving to Moncton on March 18 from Toronto. * WestJet flight 3456 arriving to Moncton March 16 from Toronto. * WestJet flight 3440 arriving to Moncton on March 8 from Toronto.Last week, Russell said there was a COVID-19 case connected to Sunwing flight 169 from Punta Cana to Fredericton on March 18.During Wednesday's news conference, Russell said information about flights at risk of COVID-19 is also being provided by the airlines. She said residents can access information about whether a flight was at risk of COVID-19 on the Public Health Agency of Canada website.However, that information is not available on the government website. Anyone who has been in close contact with someone on one of those flights is urged to self-isolate for 14 days and should call 811 if they develop symptoms.Renovation still going on at Fredericton International Airport  Construction at the Fredericton International Airport could see potential impact with supplies coming in from other provinces. "We're expecting to have some challenges there," said Johanne Gallant, CEO and president of the airport authority.The renovation project, which started almost two years ago, is continuing. "That's a closed site so the mingling between our employees and the construction workers, that has completely stopped over a few weeks ago," said Gallant.The airport changes are expected to include more ticket counters, a larger kitchen, renovated washrooms, a children's play area, more seating and more energy-efficient geothermal heating.The Fredericton airport has been operating above capacity for almost a decade.The airport hasn't laid anyone off during the outbreak, but Gallant said it's been "very quiet."The airport is looking at a 70 per cent loss in revenue for the year and Gallant is hoping the federal government will step in to help."This is a huge impact for all airports across the nation and all over the world."Dr. Jennifer Russell, New Brunswick's chief medical officer of health and Premier Blaine Higgs have been urging people to keep their physical distance and stay home.Premier and chief medical officer share microphoneAt daily news conferences both Russell and Higgs have been sharing a microphone to inform New Brunswickers."We can definitely address that," Russell said. "We do have some Purell here that the premier and I are using." Russell said she and the premier are using the Purrell to disinfect their hands when they speak at the podium. Last month, Higgs and Russell were sitting on opposite sides of the room to answer questions from reporters. Over the past two weeks, they have been sharing one microphone while addressing questions from reporters over the phone. Both Higgs and Russell use one podium to provide news updates and answer reporters' questions.JDI and McCain Foundation donate $1 million to food banksJ.D. Irving Ltd. has announced it will donate $1 million to the Food Depot Alimentaire, which supplies food banks in southeastern New Brunswick.The company said the donation would help offset the growing demand on New Brunswick's network of 60 food banks across the province because of the financial hardships caused by the COVID-19 outbreak. "J.D. Irving has been a strong community partner of the Food Depot Alimentaire over the past number of years with both food and funding support," said Dale Hicks, president of Food Depot Alimentaire. "This significant donation, at an unprecedented time in our history, is a testament to their continued support of our programs and those New Brunswickers who benefit from this generosity through local food banks." While many food banks have lost their ability to raise money, it is anticipated there will be a 50 per cent increase in the meals the Food Depot Alimentaire will need to provide across New Brunswick.The McCain Foundation has also donated $1 million to Food Depot Alimentaire to serve New Brunswick's "most vulnerable communities in the weeks and months head."The foundation is funded by McCain Foods Ltd., and supports projects across Canada.What to do if you have symptoms?Symptoms of coronavirus include fever, cough or breathlessness. In this case, residents should: * Stay at home. * Immediately call Tele-Care 811. * Describe symptoms and travel history. * Follow instructions carefully.