System departs, but potent squalls ahead, as temperatures plunge

Digital Writers
·2 min read
System departs, but potent squalls ahead, as temperatures plunge
System departs, but potent squalls ahead, as temperatures plunge

After a burst of snow that made for difficult travel for parts of the province Friday morning and afternoon, the Colorado low that brought it will be long gone from Ontario by Saturday morning. However, it leaves behind strong winds and plunging temperatures that will combine to whip up roving bands of lake-effect snow for the province's usual snow belt communities. Already starting up Friday, by Saturday night, some 20-30+ cm is expected for those areas, with locally higher amounts of 40-50 cm not out of the question. A closer look, below.

WEEKEND: SQUALLS CONTINUE INTO SATURDAY, POLAR VORTEX STAYS FURTHER NORTH, ACTIVE PATTERN RETURNS

Though the system will have long departed the province by Saturday morning, Ontario is not finished with snow, thanks to the lingering lake-effect snow that will mark much of the day.

Thanks to blustery winds and cold temperatures, communities near the Bruce Peninsula and the eastern shores of Georgian Bay will be particularly hard-hit, as will areas east of Lake Superior. Some 20-30 cm is possible by Saturday afternoon for those areas.

ONSnow
ONSnow

As well, a weak system will track across southern Ontario in the overnight period Saturday, bringing some snow. There is likely to be a burst of snow early Sunday morning, with the potential for a quick 2-5 cm to accumulate during a 1-3-hour period as the band tracks across the region.

Gusty winds will also cause poor visibility with blowing snow.

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Temperature-wise, a prominent lobe of the polar vortex this winter is expected to migrate over parts of Central Canada for the weekend, featuring some very cold temperatures and wind chills.

NEXT WEEK: COLDER DAYS

Initi

However, there has been a significant change in the expected pattern for early next week. Warmer air to the south will fight back for a couple day, so the Arctic boundary will be much further north and closer to the region than initially expected.

ONWedTemp
ONWedTemp

As a result, temperatures will not be as cold and lake-effect snow will diminish, but we will also see a more active pattern as we will be closer to the storm track.

"However, we are uncertain if we will see a couple of weak systems early next week or one stronger storm. Either way, it should be a snowy start to the week," says Weather Network meteorologist Dr. Doug Gillham.

Arctic air will then take over during the second half of the week, with lake-effect snow squalls resuming and our coldest temperatures of the season.

Frost bite graphic
Frost bite graphic

Thumbnail courtesy of Jeremy Cohn.

Be sure to check back for the latest on the winter weather in Ontario.