Prince Albert, Sask. business owner sells most Toffifee of any vendor in the world

Malcolm Jenkins is motivated by an image in his mind: a pile of Toffifee boxes sitting in a warehouse waiting to be sold during the holiday season.

Jenkins, a Canadian Tire dealer in Prince Albert, has been dealing Toffifee for a few years now and uses proceeds to fund a good cause in the city.

"Prince Albert is such an incredibly generous city," Jenkins told CBC Radio's The Afternoon Edition on Friday, as he discussed his 2019 Toffifee campaign to raise money and awareness for a hospice.

"People really get behind it whenever there is a good cause."

Jenkins' Canadian Tire store slings the most Toffifee of any other merchant in the world. In 2019, this store sold 28,600 packages of the candy.

A dollar from each sale goes to the Rose Garden Hospice building fund, meaning nearly $30,000 was raised.

Jenkins has a Toffifee Lifetime Achievement Award to show for his efforts.

The habit started a few years ago when he sold 2,000 packages. Jenkins wanted to make a challenge out of it and decided to try to sell 5,000 the next year. That goal has since been surpassed and increased.

Why? Well, why not?

"It could've been Mars bars, I guess," Jenkins said, looking back on the initial choice. "We just picked Toffifee."

Each package contains 15 pieces of the chewy chocolate treat. That means there were about 429,000 pieces distributed in and around the Gateway to the North in 2019 — about 11 pieces and some change for each resident of the city.

The snack has been so popular in the city that the store has imposed a limit of 10 boxes per customer.

The hospice fund is looking to raise around $4 million. Jenkins said people have also been donating money on top of buying the candy and the goal is nearly to the $2 million mark.

Jenkins said the Toffifee goal for next year will be to sell 30,000 units. That's 450,000 instances of toffee nougat mastication, all for a good cause.

"It's motivating to have a big mountain of it looking at you and say 'well, better find a way to sell this,'" he said.