Prince Harry to Sit In on Bon Jovi Recording Session at Abbey Road Studios

Bianca Betancourt
Photo credit: Getty Images

From Harper's BAZAAR

  • Prince Harry is scheduled to meet Jon Bon Jovi at Abbey Road Studios to sit in on a re-recording of the rock star's hit song "Unbroken" with the Invictus Games Choir.
  • The re-recording will be released in March, and proceeds will benefit the Invictus Games Foundation.
  • The special meeting will be one of Harry's upcoming March obligations as he and Duchess Meghan finish the last of their remaining royal duties.

Prince Harry is headed to Abbey Road.

The Duke of Sussex will be visiting the legendary studio on February 28 to sit in on a special recording session with Jon Bon Jovi and the Invictus Games Choir. The legendary rock star alongside members of the choir will be re-recording Bon Jovi's hit song "Unbroken" to benefit the Invictus Games Foundation.

Harry teased the upcoming meeting by posting a video via the Sussex Royal Instagram account, mimicking a text conversation between the duke and the "Living on a Prayer" singer.

Bon Jovi originally wrote "Unbroken" to shed a light on veterans living with post-traumatic stress disorder and their service to the military and their country. The Invictus Games Choir is managed and delivered by Help for Heroes, an organization made up of wounded, injured, and sick veterans from all branches of the UK Armed Forces who come together and "use the power of music to aid their recovery."

The upcoming recording session is set to take place in Studio Two at Abbey Road Studios—the same location where The Beatles recorded 11 of their 13 total albums. The re-recorded single is set to release in March, soon after the initial session.

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    CBC

    Drunk driver who killed a family of four in 2016 given day parole

    Lou and Linda Van de Vorst will never get over the shock and grief of their son and his family being killed in a drunk driving crash."Never, never in a million years — and especially in the crash that happened — you never lose that," said Linda Van de Vorst.In early 2016, Jordan Van de Vorst and his wife Chanda died on scene while their kids Kamryn and Miguire died in hospital after Catherine McKay, who had a blood alcohol level three times the legal limit, failed to stop at a stop sign and crashed into their vehicle just north of Saskatoon.McKay received a 10-year sentence after pleading guilty to impaired driving causing death and was serving her time at a healing lodge.The Parole Board of Canada recently granted McKay six months of day parole to a community correctional centre or community residential facility when bed space is available. You don't have the laughter and the giggles like you used to have. And that's sad. And that was stolen from us four years ago. \- Linda Van de Vorst"They're always in the back of your mind," Linda said. "Even when you do come together for a meal, you look at one quarter of the table and you know that those four faces were sitting there and you just know you miss them. It's never ending. That is the part of life that just doesn't go away."The pain you see on your kids when a birthday comes up or an anniversary or any special occasion. Who wants to celebrate because it's just not the same anymore."You don't have the laughter and the giggles like you used to have. And that's sad. And that was stolen from us four years ago."The Van de Vorsts say they were opposed to McKay receiving full parole, which was denied."As far as we're concerned, parole itself — we would not be in favour of that," Lou said. "But at the same time we know that there are steps for her rehabilitation and reintegration into society and we would sooner have it step by step rather than right away throw her into the whole full thing of having full parole."The parole board says the 53-year-old McKay has not made excuses for her crimes and has consistently worked on dealing with her personal trauma and substance abuse issues.The board said in its decision that McKay had a good upbringing, but was sexually abused by an acquaintance of her family for several years.As a teen, she began using drugs and alcohol. In 2015, she suffered a concussion and lived with chronic pain.In the months leading up to the crash, the board said, McKay admitted to drinking to cope with pain, anxiety and panic attacks."You recognize your behaviours were becoming more impulsive and trips at the local bar were becoming more frequent," the board said.The day of the crash, McKay recalled meeting up with a man and intending to only have one drink."You said if you could go back to that day to change one thing, you would not have been drinking at all," the board said.While at the healing lodge, McKay has looked to elders for help, the board noted. She participated in an Indigenous sundance ceremony, in which she fasted and earned the spirit name "Sky Woman.""You said you had an 'incredible spiritual awakening' and then described the four days where you stood and prayed into a tree and danced to the tree and could feel a power greater than yourself."McKay plans to rely on Alcoholics Anonymous for help and said she feels repulsed by the thought of drinking, said the board.Linda Van de Vorst said she will always hold McKay responsible for taking the lives of her four family members."And I know that she will live with that for the rest of her life, and unfortunately her children will also live with that memory as well for the rest of their lives," she said."But she made a promise in court four years ago and that promise was that she would do everything possible (to) carry on the message to not drink and drive and I'm going to hold her to that."It doesn't matter if she's in jail, in a halfway house or full parole... I'm holding her to her promise to change things."The Van de Vorsts have been strong voices against drinking and driving and said they will continue their work with organizations like Madd Canada."For those people that (continue to drink and drive) I would wish and I pray that they would really think before they go out to not drink and drive," Linda said."Because if they kill someone you can't repair that. They will never repair that. They will never live that down for the rest of their life. And everyone gets affected by that."

  • Kept apart from elderly father in care home, a B.C. family waits anxiously
    News
    CBC

    Kept apart from elderly father in care home, a B.C. family waits anxiously

    Della Gough has a new ritual: looking at the website of Haro Park long-term care home to check the latest numbers of residents who are infected with COVID-19 — or have died.Gough's 82-year-old father, William Lomax, lives at the complex care centre in Vancouver's West End that has become the scene of one of the province's most troubling coronavirus outbreaks."It's stressful," Gough said. "My concern is that he could die from that and many other residents there may die as well."On Thursday, Haro Park announced 2 more residents had died from the disease, bringing the total number of dead to eight. Over 30 other residents have tested positive for the virus along with more than 20 staff members.Her father is in good health, she explained. She and her two siblings can't visit him but they talk on the phone.All they can do is wait and hope for the best like many other anxious families.Connecting distantlyAcross Canada, families have been kept physically apart from loved ones in care homes to reduce the risks of spreading COVID-19.Some are getting creative to remain connected. At Haro Park, Sam Monckton played her trumpet for her father from outside the building as a way of giving him — and the other residents — some joy. Unfortunately, her father Garry, 78, who was among the residents fighting COVID-19, died early Thursday morning."[I'm] pretty much in a state of shock still," Monckton said on CBC's On The Coast late Thursday. A sense of powerlessnessGough said for families there remains a sense of powerlessness and not knowing what comes next."I feel like my hands are tied behind my back and I can't do anything to help my dad," Gough said.Bruce Hampson has been through that feeling as well. His father, Arthur "Bill" Hampson, was the first resident of Haro Park whose death was connected to COVID-19."It's just a horrible virus. Somehow, it got into the home. Somehow, it killed my father," Hampson said. "Would I like to know how it got there? You bet I'd like to know. But can I live without knowing? I guess so."'They should be high priority'Gough says there is no way of knowing if staff are able to keep up with the new demands of the pandemic. There is nothing she can do to help keep her father's environment disinfected.She and her family want more to be done to protect people like her father including Health Minister Adrian Dix taking a personal oversight role."These are the most vulnerable people in our society," she said. "They should be high priority."B.C.'s Ministry of Health declined to comment for this story but referred CBC News to a statement from Vancouver Coastal Health, which works in partnership with the Haro Park Society to run the facility."We recognize the increased concern families have about the safety of their loved ones," a health authority spokesperson said in an email. "Our hearts go out to family, friends and staff of Haro Park Centre."The authority says a medical health officer is leading the outbreak response at the facility. That response involves increased decontamination, including high-use surfaces like phones. All staff are wearing appropriate protective equipment, the authority said.An infection control practitioner is also at the facility, it said, and the focus is on preventing COVID-19 spreading to any other residents.

  • Cardboard cutouts pose as guests for wedding amid COVID-19
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Cardboard cutouts pose as guests for wedding amid COVID-19

    DOWAGIAC, Mich. — Cardboard cutout wedding guests will make for a not-so-cookie-cutter wedding as a Michigan couple prepares to tie the knot during the coronavirus pandemic.After Amy Simonson and Dan Stuglik’s wedding plans were disrupted amid the outbreak, a packaging company donated more than 100 cardboard cutouts to pose as stand-ins for the family and friends who couldn’t attend the wedding this Saturday because of Michigan’s stay-at-home order.Menasha Packaging Co. in Coloma made cutouts to resemble guests tall and short, young and old, with long hair, short hair and ponytails."(Stuglik) was just looking for a general person shape, but I was able to make a little bit more realistic audience for them,” Ted Harris, customer service and design manager at Menasha, told The Herald-Palladium.Stuglik, a Coloma Township police officer, said he’ll forever be thankful to Menasha for helping him do something special for his fiancée.“I wanted to do something (creative) so she wouldn’t walk down the aisle to an empty church,” he said. “That was a painful part, that her wedding was being stripped away from her, but Menasha helped bring a little back.”The Associated Press

  • Toronto taking steps to protect seniors in long-term care
    Global News

    Toronto taking steps to protect seniors in long-term care

    COVID-19 cases have continued to multiply among seniors. Outbreaks have been confirmed at several nursing homes across Ontario. A Toronto man is celebrating a milestone with his family at a distance. Shallima Maharaj reports.

  • CAF members begin 14-day isolation in Halifax prior to COVID-19 mission
    News
    CBC

    CAF members begin 14-day isolation in Halifax prior to COVID-19 mission

    Members of the Canadian Armed Forces, mostly members of the Royal Canadian Navy, began 14 days in isolation at a Halifax hotel on Thursday.It is a precaution against COVID-19 infection prior to setting out to sea for potential deployment to Canadian communities during the crisis.The isolation order covers about 260 crew members of the HMCS Moncton and HMCS Ville de Quebec, along with a Cyclone helicopter air detachment.The members will not be permitted to leave their rooms, or to interact with one another physically, for the two-week period.They will communicate electronically to prepare for deployment, say officials, and will follow a structured routine that includes online workout programs. Military staff, with at least one wearing a mask, operated a checkpoint at the hotel's main entrance Thursday as the crew members bid their spouses and children goodbye before entering the building with their bags in tow.Rear Admiral Craig Baines, commander of Maritime Forces Atlantic, said the isolation period gives the military the best chance of avoiding community spread on one of its ships."We're seeing right now around the world that our allies are having situations in ships where the virus is spreading," said the admiral."(Coronavirus) spreads very quickly because of the close proximity of sailors. We think this is the best way to lower the risk as much as possible to protect the health of our sailors and aviators so that they're available and healthy to help Canadians in their time of need."None of the crew members sequestered in Halifax on Thursday had tested positive for COVID-19 as of Monday, according to the military, which has assessed them as low risk for getting the virus given their actions so far.'Maximum flexibility'Baines said once the two weeks are up, the ships would likely head to sea for manoeuvres and equipment tests.The crews would be on standby "over the next couple months," the admiral added, with the vessels working together or separately depending on the situation."We would retain maximum flexibility," he said. "Primarily it would be being prepared for any sort of domestic response that might be required — all the way from a search-and-rescue situation that could occur on the water to something that might be required to support a community that has an issue with the COVID-19 situation."The military is organizing up to 24,000 full-time and part-time members into "rapid reaction" teams to deliver supplies and to support provinces and municipalities. HMCS Moncton and HMCS Ville de Quebec would also be available for international deployment during the pandemic that has killed more than 45,000 people worldwide, including more than 100 in Canada.You're 'alone'The crew members in Halifax isolation range from new recruits on their first mission to veterans such as Maj. Norman Hanley, who admitted the start of his deployment was unlike any he had experienced in his 30-year career."It's interesting, isn't it?" he said. "When you're on ship you're alone with your own thoughts but there's people around all the time. In this case you're going to be alone physically."He added he's more concerned about his children than himself."[I've been] freaking out the last week knowing that I'm coming here," he said. "I've got five kids and my wife is at home having to deal with that. And I can't leave the room. I can't do anything to help her."Mental health checksThe military is monitoring the sequestered sailors' mental health, said Baines. "In this particular case we're going to make sure that we're talking to them multiple times a day, checking in with them," he said, adding that members underwent medical screening to confirm their fitness for the unusual mission.The sequestered sailors will have access to alcohol and marijuana edibles in their rooms after hours, but not cigarettes. Therefore about 50 crew members were disqualified from the mission because they are smokers. As Rhiannon Morgan saw off her 20-year-old son, Niall, on Thursday, she said the leading seaman is "a little nervous" about his first deployment, but that he's taking the two-week isolation order in stride."He lives at home, still spends most of the time in his room," said Morgan. "He socializes with his friends on Xbox. I think his generation is way better set up for this. It will probably be easier for him than it would be for me."MORE TOP STORIES

  • Australia closes internal borders to capitalise on fall in new coronavirus cases
    News
    Reuters

    Australia closes internal borders to capitalise on fall in new coronavirus cases

    Australian officials closed internal borders on Friday and warned people to stay home over the upcoming Easter holiday as the country seeks to capitalise on a further fall in the rate of new coronavirus cases. Prime Minister Scott Morrison said Australia was shifting to a "suppression" phase in its fight against the highly contagious illness, but stressed that people had to continue to follow orders restricting socialising in public. Chief Health Officer Brendan Murphy said the daily increase in new infections had fallen to about 5% from between 25% and 30% two weeks ago.

  • Dramatic drop in traffic at Confederation Bridge due to COVID-19 pandemic
    News
    CBC

    Dramatic drop in traffic at Confederation Bridge due to COVID-19 pandemic

    Confederation Bridge has seen its car traffic plummet as travellers heed health officials warnings to stay home.Car traffic is down 90 per cent of what it was this time last year, according to Michel LeChasseur, general manager of Strait Crossing Bridge Ltd.Truck traffic is down too, but not as dramatically. It's down about 12 per cent of what it was last year, because many big trucks continue to bring essential loads, including food, to the Island, he said.LeChasseur said he started to see a drop in traffic immediately after the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a pandemic. He said that drop was even more dramatic once P.E.I. and New Brunswick put checkpoints in place on either side of the 12.9 kilometre bridge, starting on March 23. LeChasseur says it's important that everybody follows the direction of the chief public health officer, so the drop in traffic is not unexpected. "Is the bridge suffering financially? Of course. But so is everybody else," said LeChasseur."Everybody is affected so we're certainly not unique and like everybody else we want to work together to make sure we have this under control." New protective measures for staffThe Confederation Bridge is an essential service so they have maintained staffing levels, he said.The company has 45 employees working at the bridge. They used to work in teams, sharing the same shifts and workdays.But now their hours have been staggered, so if one person gets sick, the whole team doesn't have to stay home for 14 days, he said.Toll booth operators no longer share booths and they no longer accept cash.They have also temporarily suspended the pedestrian shuttle to ensure physical distancing can be maintained.'We have to work together'LeChasseur said they have not had any complaints. He said people understand that these measures are necessary. As for whether the losses now could impact tolls later, LeChasseur said those discussions are for another day. LeChasseur said the bridge may see a further reduction in traffic if construction projects on the Island come to a halt."We have to work together to follow the orders of the public authorities," he said.COVID-19: What you need to knowWhat are the symptoms of COVID-19?Common symptoms include: * Fever. * Cough. * Tiredness.But more serious symptoms can develop, including difficulty breathing and pneumonia, which can lead to death.Health Canada has built a self-assessment tool.What should I do if I feel sick?Isolate yourself and call 811. Do not visit an emergency room or urgent care centre to get tested. A health professional at 811 will give you advice and instructions.How can I protect myself? * Wash your hands frequently and thoroughly. * Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. * Clean regularly touched surfaces regularly.More detailed information on the outbreak is available on the federal government's website.More COVID-19 stories from CBC P.E.I.

  • At Brazil's biggest cemetery, grave diggers take own measure of coronavirus toll
    News
    Reuters

    At Brazil's biggest cemetery, grave diggers take own measure of coronavirus toll

    As Oswaldo dos Santos watched several men in protective suits dig a hasty grave for his 36-year-old son, his grief was mixed with fear: What if he had the coronavirus? Dos Santos lived with his son until Sunday, when he was suddenly hospitalized with severe respiratory problems. Like so many now filling the graves in Brazil's biggest cemetery, the son died before getting the results of a coronavirus test.

  • News
    CBC

    Toll-free Sask. COVID-19 hotline also acting as way to report non-compliance with guidelines

    A toll-free line designed to answer Saskatchewanians' non-health questions about COVID-19 also acts as a way to report alleged violations of mandatory public health orders.The Saskatchewan Public Safety Agency said in a news release Thursday that toll-free line operators, available at 1-855-559-5502, work with both police and public health officials to follow up on concerns. The line is operated 24 hours a day, seven days a week.Non-compliance concerns can also be submitted online.On March 20, Premier Scott Moe said he had given police the powers up to and including arrest to enforce the chief medical health officer's orders for the public to maintain physical distance.Nine days later, RCMP arrested 11 people for, among other things, violating the public health order issued by the chief medical health officer prohibiting gatherings over 10 people. On Thursday, RCMP said that between March 20 and March 30, officers responded to 436 calls for service related to COVID-19. Gatherings of more than 10 people yielded 57 complaints, resulting in seven warnings and one charge laid. There were 110 reports of people failing to self-isolate when allegedly required to do so, resulting in 27 warnings. There were also 13 complaints of businesses not complying with the public health order, resulting in three warnings. "The vast majority of these calls for service were resolved by educating members of the public of the potential health and enforcement consequences that can result from non-compliance with the Public Health Order," the RCMP release said.Municipal police direct public to lineA statement from the Regina Police Service said some matters brought to their attention through the tip line will be enforced by police, while other matters will provide an opportunity for education of the public."Since the line is just being promoted as the go-to for concerns about people not complying with public health orders, there have been no tickets issued by police yet," the statement said. "There may be some investigations underway."Both the Saskatoon Police Service and the Moose Jaw Police Service said the directive was a provincial one. A spokesperson for the Prince Albert Police Service said the force had seen an increase in COVID-19 related calls, many of them related to health and other concerns, but no arrests or tickets were issued directly related to the public health orders. "We are urging voluntary compliance [with the public health orders] and hoping people will follow this public health order so police members don't have to come out and enforce it," Charlene Tebbutt said.

  • N.W.T. RCMP advise public on dangers posed by life in isolation — exploitation and abuse
    News
    CBC

    N.W.T. RCMP advise public on dangers posed by life in isolation — exploitation and abuse

    In a pair of news releases sent Thursday afternoon, RCMP in the Northwest Territories offered the public some advice on how to navigate the new potential dangers of life in isolation.First, the RCMP's Internet Child Exploitation Unit advised parents of the increased risk of online exploitation as children spend more time at home and online.Police followed up with a release highlighting the elevated risk of domestic violence under isolation."As a community, we can support each other, by looking out for one another, and keeping an eye on those we believe may be at risk," the second news release reads.Children at risk of sexual exploitationIn their first release, the RCMP highlighted some of the ways that kids, left unsupervised on the internet, could fall victim to child predators.Often, predators pose as children online to coerce sexually explicit images, police say. Other times, "predators come across as a trusted adult forging a relationship with a young person online.""Then later arrange to meet and abuse the young person," the release states. "Often in cases involving adults and youth, they are manipulated into believing the person is their boyfriend/girlfriend."The release advises parents to educate children on online safety, review games and apps before downloading, keep electronic devices in a common room, and encourage kids to report requests for explicit photos.It also advises parents to "pay attention to interactions between adults and children … [and] model appropriate boundaries," as well as keep an eye out for sudden changes in behaviour."Often children will communicate more through behaviour than words when distressed," the release reads.Heightened risk of abuse for women, children, LGBTQ+RCMP's second news release highlighted a further risk to children and adults: domestic abuse."Stress and the disruption of social and protective networks can exacerbate the risk for violence against women," the release reads. "Children, men and Two-Spirit-LGBTQ community may also be at risk."In the release, the RCMP says it's "responding to all calls for service 24/7/365.""If you are a victim or you believe [someone] is experiencing violence, please call," say police. "Family, friends and neighbours can all be part of the support network."Local RCMP detachments can still be contacted via local -1111 emergency numbers or, now, via 911.The release also says family violence shelters continue to be "available 24/7" in Fort Smith, Hay River, Inuvik, Tuktoyaktuk and Yellowknife.In addition to those resources, residents have access to three 1-800 help lines: * the N.W.T. Help Line at 1-800-661-0844; * Kids Help Phone at 1-800-668-6868; * and the Hope for Wellness Line at 1-855-242-3310.Due to the high volume of calls to the 1-800 number system, some calls are not immediately being connected.

  • News
    CBC

    COVID-19 public health orders now enforceable, fines between $1,000 and $500,000

    Edmonton police officers could soon hand out fines to people or businesses that violate current public health orders. Alberta Health Services said those who breach the orders may be ticketed $1,000 per occurrence. For more serious violations, courts could administer fines of up to $100,000 for a first offence and up to $500,000 for a subsequent offence.The Edmonton Police Service is currently working through a backlog of complaints from the public, said Insp. Ray Akbar, operations chief for the police pandemic response team.Police and health officials have previously asked the public not to call 911 to report perceived violations of public health orders. "We've seen a reduction of calls for complaints with regards to compliance through the 911 line," Akbar said. "However, we do still see a few of them coming through."For the most part the public are being mindful, they're being respectful, and they recognize the risks around COVID-19 and the spread of the virus itself." An online system of reporting is being launched in partnership with Alberta Health Services, which will funnel information to public health inspectors so they can investigate complaints. "Enforcement is an option for us," Akbar said. "We will issue tickets if required."He said the updated legislation had just been sent to the office so he did not have any examples of tickets being issued as of Thursday. Police are also monitoring locations that could present a risk, especially to vulnerable populations. "We want to be sure that we use a lot of discretion," Akbar said. "We want to ensure that the public is adequately educated."In a release, EPS said it will be watching for gatherings of more than 15 people, indoors or outdoors, physical distancing adherence and facility closures.Akbar said two EPS members have confirmed cases of COVID-19. One is a sworn officer and the other is not.Several members are self-isolating, he said, either because they recently travelled or because they were showing symptoms of a cold or flu.

  • The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada
    News
    The Canadian Press

    The latest numbers on COVID-19 in Canada

    The latest numbers of confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases in Canada as of 6:14 p.m. on April 2, 2020:There are 11,283 confirmed and presumptive cases in Canada._ Quebec: 5,518 confirmed (including 36 deaths, 224 resolved)_ Ontario: 2,793 confirmed (including 53 deaths, 831 resolved)_ British Columbia: 1,121 confirmed (including 31 deaths, 641 resolved)_ Alberta: 968 confirmed (including 13 deaths, 174 resolved)_ Saskatchewan: 206 confirmed (including 3 deaths, 36 resolved)_ Nova Scotia: 193 confirmed (including 16 resolved)_ Newfoundland and Labrador: 183 confirmed (including 1 death, 10 resolved)_ Manitoba: 152 confirmed (including 1 death, 11 resolved), 15 presumptive_ New Brunswick: 91 confirmed (including 22 resolved)_ Prince Edward Island: 22 confirmed (including 3 resolved)_ Repatriated Canadians: 13 confirmed_ Yukon: 6 confirmed_ Northwest Territories: 2 confirmed_ Nunavut: No confirmed cases_ Total: 11,283 (15 presumptive, 11,268 confirmed including 138 deaths, 1,968 resolved)This report by The Canadian Press was first published April 2, 2020.The Canadian Press

  • News
    CBC

    Edmonton closes fenced off-leash dog parks amid pandemic

    The City of Edmonton is closing fenced off-leash dog parks, council's emergency advisory committee heard Thursday. As of Saturday morning, Lauderdale, Alex Decoteau, Manning Village and Paisley will be closed to the public. The city's 38 other off-leash areas will be switched to on-leash. Keeping dogs on-leash reduces the potential for owners to have to intervene with other people if their dog runs off, the city says. Councillors said they expect complaints from residents about the decision. During the meeting, Coun. Scott McKeen asked if there was a way to be able to keep the Alex Decoteau park open, such as having a volunteer monitor behaviour. "[It's] a very popular amenity in a very high-density area," McKeen said. "That is an incredibly important amenity for people living in the downtown." But David Aitken, the chair of the city's COVID-19 task team, said the closure is a necessary measure to prevent overcrowding."We think as we move deeper into the pandemic, that this is the first step of many." Aitken said the city will continue to monitor the crowds in the park. "We certainly understand the frustration that comes with shutting down those facilities that are well-used but we think it errs on the side of caution and safety and it's something right now that we think is needed." All off-leash parks in cities like Toronto and Montreal are closed, he noted. In further measures announced Thursday, the city is looking at closing lanes of Saskatchewan Drive between 105th and 109th Streets and Victoria Promenade to vehicles.The city is also considering limiting traffic on River Valley Road but it's not clear when lanes will be closed. The new measures come as the emergency advisory committee agreed to renew the city's state of local emergency to deal with COVID-19.It's the second time council has extended the order after it was initially declared on Mar. 20.By law, the state of local emergency, which gives the city extraordinary authority to impose restrictions on public activity, needs to be renewed every seven days.The city has imposed several restrictions on the Edmonton public in the past two weeks, including strict rules for taxis and ride-sharing services on Wednesday. Edmonton transit service announced Thursday it is adding more security on buses and LRT stations after receiving more reports of aggressive behaviour and homeless people using public transit as a shelter. @natashariebe

  • Costume designers creating protective gowns for frontline workers
    News
    CBC

    Costume designers creating protective gowns for frontline workers

    The same hands that have designed costumes for films, movies and theatrical productions in Alberta are now hard at work making protective clothing for frontline workers during the COVID-19 pandemic.It's a project in Calgary being led by the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) Local 212.Alberta film and theatre employees were eager to help, especially considering the fact that filming on shows like Wynonna Earp and Black Summer are on hiatus due to provincial shutdowns."Our union builds everything. From modern-day clothing of every description you could imagine, to sci-fi, to period historical costuming … anything that a designer requires us to make," said Deborah Day with IATSE Local 212 in an interview with the Calgary Eyeopener.And now, they're sewing protective gear based off of requests within Calgary.Led by the IATSE Local 212, organizers are collaborating with Costume Alchemy, a studio that offers workshops for a range of skills related to costume design, working out of that building as a base.The actual designers come from within the union and beyond. Social media posts have brought attention to the project, which has drawn in more workers.The goal is to make 150 gowns for employees and volunteers at the Calgary Drop-In Centre, following a request for the gowns to be used at their donation location.Though the effort is local, there are similar efforts by IATSE groups across North America to create items needed during the COVID-19 pandemic, such as masks.Gown breakdownDay said the group has been working non-stop to organize the effort.There was a list of designers to organize, a pattern for the gown to finalize and fabric to acquire.The protective gowns are designed to be worn over clothing, providing another washable layer of protection for employees and volunteers."They're classified as a protective gown. They're a long-sleeved, cuffed gown so that gloves can be pulled up overtop of the cuffing. And they tie at the neck and they tie in the back [and] there's a double layer that wraps in the front," Day said."They're pretty easy to replicate. I just took it apart and sent it to a cutter to create the first pattern."Kits of the pattern, fabric and other trimmings needed to get started on sewing are being assembled at the Costume Alchemy workshop. To date, 111 kits have already been sent out and are in the midst of creation.The project members are still looking for more fabric, as each gown takes about 3.5 metres of fabric to make.And it can't just be any fabric — it must be a wearable cotton, polyester or poly-cotton blend, Day said. It must be capable of being washed in very hot water with strong chemicals.The fabric the group is currently working with has come from union members' personal stores and donations from the public. Several bolts of fabric have also been donated by the Fabric Depot.While the project has been underway, Day said their union has received another request from a local women's charity for a number of gowns, which means they will need even more fabric to continue sewing.Day said people with suitable fabric can drop it off in a bin outside of Costume Alchemy.

  • News
    CBC

    A psychologist's advice to maintain your routine during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Normal, everyday tasks like showering, eating proper meals and exercising may no longer be the No. 1 priority — but a clinical psychologist in Halifax is reminding people that maintaining a routine is especially important during the COVID-19 pandemic."Our frontal lobe, which is the part that controls behaviour — it's like a battery, you have to keep it charged," Dr. Dayna Lee-Baggley with the Nova Scotia Health Authority told CBC's Information Morning Thursday."And so it's especially important in this time to be deliberate and purposeful about charging our batteries."Lee-Baggley says one way to recharge that battery is to stick to a daily routine.But even professionals can have bad days."On Monday, I was focused on my kid. I was focused on patients. I was focused on getting things done. And it was three o'clock in the afternoon, and I realized I hadn't eaten anything. I was dehydrated," Lee-Baggley said.She said she was surprised by how much effort it took to focus on ordinary tasks like eating meals, but during the COVID-19 pandemic when routines are thrown out of balance, she said it is understandable.Routines were disrupted again Thursday, when Premier Stephen McNeil announced Nova Scotia's state of emergency was extended for another two weeks.Now, Lee-Baggley keeps a list of important daily tasks on her fridge to remind her to recharge her mental battery.Her conversation with Information Morning host Portia Clark has been edited for clarity and length.Q: To maintain your routine, you have this personal checklist on your fridge. What do you have on your checklist?A: Sometimes my frontal lobe is so tired I can't even remember what the things are I'm supposed to do to recharge. I literally made a checklist to put on my fridge to remind me and to be deliberate and conscious about trying to check them off each day. Some of the things that are on my list are exercise, drinking water, eating green things, stretching, sleeping, socializing — having a sense of purpose. Over the last couple of days, I actually had to add showering because I realized I wasn't even doing that regularly and that actually is a recharge for me. It makes me feel like I'm ready to start my day, that I've got a few things together and ready to go.Q: Do you have fun things on your list?A: Absolutely. I have a couple. These are kind of luxurious things for me. I have "do face masks" and "paint my nails" because they are things I don't normally do. I get some of those fancy teas from David's Teas and I have a fancy mug. I've also learned how to have Zoom drinking parties. So I've learned how to socialize through Zoom. We all bring a cocktail and we chat together because those are definitely things that will charge your batteries.Q: What about having pets or having other people in the home? Do they help keep you on routine and remind you to do the things you need?A: The thing about building a routine is that it's going to take less frontal lobe energy if you start doing things as routine, so if you get up at the same time every day [or] have the same breakfast every day. The more you can turn it into routine, then you just make it easier for the frontal lobe. But then also things get in the way of that. So life's going to get in the way, meetings are going to get away, other people in your household — things will change. At that point, we also just want to be really kind to ourselves about the fact that we're not going to follow the routine, this is not going to be the most productive time in your life and to be kind to ourselves and other people.Q: How can routine be useful to health-care providers?A: In particular, I think that health-care providers need to be really conscious about charging their batteries. I spent most of the entirety of my career working with physicians and nurses and on average, health-care providers have pretty good immune systems. They're pretty good at fighting off illness. What I think sometimes is getting in the way now is that they're overworked, they're burnt out dealing with a COVID-19 crisis, and so they don't have the reserves necessary to fight off this illness the way they might normally. There's also a lot of free resources that have come about to support health-care providers. The Canadian Psychological Association, for example, is offering free therapy to health-care providers. There's also lots of businesses that have offered free resources and so healthcare providers need to be really conscious about charging their battery.MORE TOP STORIES

  • 11K raised to help black Nova Scotians during COVID-19 — but it's in limbo
    News
    CBC

    11K raised to help black Nova Scotians during COVID-19 — but it's in limbo

    More than $11,000 has been raised to help members of the black community in Nova Scotia buy necessities like food and medication during COVID-19 outbreak, but the money is in limbo and hasn't been distributed to those who need it. Organizers of the fundraising campaign say GoFundMe is refusing to release the emergency funds despite weeks of emailing back and forth. A group of community organizers, activists, and scholars began raising money earlier this month to provide emergency funds to people who've lost work or are struggling financially during the pandemic. The Black Lives Matter Solidarity Fund Nova Scotia would give applicants a one-time payment of $100 each.About 250 people applied and most need the money urgently to cover "very, very simple material needs," organizer Rachel Zellars told CBC's Mainstreet on Thursday. The campaign had a goal of $10,000, and by this week had raised $11,460."This has been for me, for us, arguably one of the most frustrating periods of my life," said Zellars, an assistant professor at Saint Mary's University in Halifax.What's the hold up?Zellars said she's done everything the company has asked in order to verify that the money will end up in the right hands. She said she contacted her bank and was told there should be no reason why the money can't be deposited into the account that was specifically set up for this purpose. GoFundMe initially told Zellars that withdrawals were on hold because the campaign needed to be managed by an organization, not an individual, and asked her to include more information on the page, to "ensure that your campaign page is as transparent as possible to your donors."Around March 23, Zellars said she "received a series of assurances" that they could access the money within two to three business days. But then in an email on Thursday, GoFundMe said the payment partner, WePay, still needed more information to verify the account.So she sent a copy of her driver's licence and got a response saying she now needs to prove her connection to the organization on file. "We're on the fourth cycle of this today, and we've just reached a breaking point," Zellars said. GoFundMe respondsIn an email to CBC News, a spokesperson for GoFundMe said it's working with Zellars to resolve the problem, and that funds are released "once all requested documents are verified from our team and there is a clear understanding of how funds are being distributed."What's most frustrating, said Zellars, is that people need the money right now, but it can take days to just get a response from the company."That we're encountering so many roadblocks at a time when they are profiting off of the suffering that peoples are going through in various communities is just absolutely unacceptable," she said. MORE TOP STORIES