Castle with 160 acres, baronial title and cottage collection available from £149k

·Yahoo Life UK contributor
·3 min read
A ruined 15th Century castle on 'Treasure Island' built for Robert the Bruce's brother is on the market. (Future Property Auctions/ SWNS)
A ruined 15th-century castle on 'Treasure Island', which was built for Robert the Bruce's brother, is on the market. (Future Property Auctions/ SWNS)

If you've always fancied being queen of your own castle, stay tuned. A castle that was built for Robert the Bruce’s brother is going up for auction with bids starting at just £149,000.

That will no doubt peak the interest of anyone looking for a wow-factor property, without the rich list price tag.

Muness Castle on the Isle of Unst was built in the 15th century for Laurence the Bruce, the half-brother of the then king of Scots.

Set on an island believed to have inspired Robert Louis Stevenson's novel Treasure Island, it is also the most northerly castle in Britain.

If you get bored of swishing around the castle itself, the property also comes with a whopping 160 acres and a collection of largely derelict cottages.

Oh and it also comes with a baronial title and gold mineral rights, something that certainly doesn't come with your average two-up, two-down.

Read more: These are the dream homes we’ve been lusting after

The castle comes with 160 acres of land and some derelict buildings. (Future Property Auctions/ SWNS)
The castle comes with 160 acres of land and some derelict buildings. (Future Property Auctions/ SWNS)

Fancy new titles aside, the new owners will have to be au-fait with the quiet as the local seals, dolphins and puffins are the castle's closest neighbours, with the nearest small village around 3 km away.

The Grade A-listed castle was sold last week but the current owners revealed the sale didn’t go through, so the property will now go back to auction.

Owner Gavin Farquhar, who owns Ecclesgreig Estate at St Cyrus, Aberdeenshire, reportedly bought Muness Castle for £65,000 in 2014 and planned to open a tourism business at the castle.

However, he is no longer interested in the idea given Scottish government policies on rates and empty building taxes.

“It was an interesting opportunity for us and we wanted to run a tourism venture on the estate, but we have zero interest in doing that now," he said.

Watch: Wood artist builds incredible ‘Hobbit house’ in his back garden

Historic Environment Scotland maintains Muness Castle, with the property described as a "splendid example" of tower house architecture.

It has a pretty interesting history as well having been originally built for Laurence Bruce of Cultmalindie – an unpopular sheriff who is remembered for the oppression of the Shetland people.

In 1627, the castle was set on fire by privateers from Dunkirk, though it was reoccupied afterwards.

Later it was sold by the Bruce family in 1718, before falling into ruin, making it a ripe opportunity for a wannabe renovator.

Read more: You can snap up this 600-year-old castle ruin for £225K (the same price as a London flat)

The local wildlife are your nearest neighbours. (Future Property Auctions/ SWNS)
The local wildlife are your nearest neighbours. (Future Property Auctions/SWNS)

Read more: The affordable rural locations house-hunters should have on their radar

Commenting on the unique property John Morris from Future Property Auctions said: "This is what I love about running an auction house.

"We always get wonderful unique lots that you would not get at any other estate agencies.

"Selling a part of Scottish heritage that comes with a Barony Title and gold mineral rights, it is truly a fantastic opportunity to purchase a unique lot.

Bids for the ruined castle, which is being sold by Future Property Auctions, will open at £149,000 but you'll need to be quick as it is set to go under the hammer on 5 May.

Additional reporting SWNS.

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting