Province to fix cracks in Cape Smokey pavement

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A Nova Scotia official is seen in this file photo from August 2021 after traffic cones were placed on a new look-off on Cape Smokey, where cracks have appeared in the Cabot Trail pavement. (Tom Ayers/CBC - image credit)
A Nova Scotia official is seen in this file photo from August 2021 after traffic cones were placed on a new look-off on Cape Smokey, where cracks have appeared in the Cabot Trail pavement. (Tom Ayers/CBC - image credit)

If you're travelling on Cape Breton's Cabot Trail this weekend and you see cracks in the pavement on Cape Smokey, don't panic.

Nova Scotia's Department of Public Works says there is no cause for concern.

"A geotechnical engineer was engaged and has completed an assessment of the location," the department said in an email.

"Cracking was noted, however, the geotechnical review indicated that there is not a risk of imminent collapse of the slope.

"As part of the review, the engineer made recommendations for the repair. A contractor has been engaged to complete this work and is currently scheduled to start on site this month."

The province rebuilt the Cabot Trail on Cape Smokey last year, spending $11 million to blast rock off the side of the mountain, widen the roadway and add a look-off.

The Cabot Trail, also known as Nova Scotia Route 30, is a roughly 300-kilometre scenic drive around the northern tip of Cape Breton.

It is especially popular in the fall as the leaves on hardwood trees change colour, leaving a carpet of red, orange and yellow across the Cape Breton highlands.

Cape Smokey is a highlight of the Cabot Trail and one of the steepest drives in the province, rising about 300 metres up from the Atlantic Ocean.

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