Public asked for feedback for P.E.I. police services review

·2 min read
The review will look at all police agencies on P.E.I. — Charlottetown,  Summerside, Kensington and the RCMP. (Laura Meader/CBC - image credit)
The review will look at all police agencies on P.E.I. — Charlottetown, Summerside, Kensington and the RCMP. (Laura Meader/CBC - image credit)

An independent consultant has been hired to gather information from the public and various groups for a provincial review of police services on the Island.

The review will look at all police agencies on P.E.I. — Charlottetown, Summerside, Kensington and the RCMP.

The goal is to determine how Islanders feel about the services they're getting, including how police respond and whether residents feel safe in their communities.

A big part of the review is an online survey, which is open now.

Times changed since last review

Government says although there was a police review four years ago a lot has changed, from the pandemic to Black Lives Matter protests, which raised awareness about racism involving police.

"The time has changed," said Bloyce Thompson, minister of justice and public safety.

"We had Black Lives Matter happen this summer, and we really have to take a look at policing through the lens of everything that's happening now, particularly the pandemic of course, and of course mental health."

Courtney Crosby, a mental health advocate, hopes it will lead to improvements.

"I personally have witnessed and heard many very difficult stories as it pertains to having police involved in a mental health crisis," she said.

"I have witnessed a child as young as 10 years old being handcuffed during a time of a mental health crisis."

Welcomes feedback

RCMP Sgt. Chris Gunn said community information is important and he welcomes the feedback.

"This is another platform for the public to contact us."

The online survey is open for the next three weeks, and consultants will also be meeting with various groups in the coming months.

"I'm really excited the government is reaching out for that feedback," Crosby said.

"I think it tells us that the message that is delivered is that potentially they do see an issue and want to hear that feedback from the general public."

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