Quilt made of pandemic mask scraps hangs in Windsor museum

·2 min read
About 700 panels were submitted for the quilt, but those were narrowed down to the ones shown here. The quilt will hang in Chimczuk Museum throughout the summer. (Darrin Di Carlo/CBC - image credit)
About 700 panels were submitted for the quilt, but those were narrowed down to the ones shown here. The quilt will hang in Chimczuk Museum throughout the summer. (Darrin Di Carlo/CBC - image credit)

A local community group has sewn together a quilt made of cloth mask scraps, according to Chimczuk Museum — which is where the piece now hangs on display.

Museum coordinator Craig Capacchione told CBC News that the quilt was put together by Windsor-Essex Sewing Force. He said the group first came together in 2020 to help sew cloth masks for health-care workers, as there was a shortage of available masks.

"After the masks were created they had the idea to create a community quilt to kind of honour the COVID-19 pandemic and honour the people who were touched by the pandemic and worked the pandemic, using some of the scraps from some of the masks they created," Capacchione said, adding it took seven months to put the quilt together.

There were 700 quilt panels submitted, a number of which were then selected for the final quilt.

WATCH: Museum coordinator shares how the quilt was put together

"If you take a look at the quilt, you can see a lot of themes revolving around nursing and health care," he said.

"There's also a lot of community pride squares ... to kind of show the community coming together, to show people working together to try to help get through this pandemic together."

Capacchione added that other people took an artistic interpretation of the pandemic, their reaction to COVID-19 or how they spent their time over the last few years.

He said lots of people might not realize all the work that goes into sewing and the art of it.

"A quilt is kind of a warm embrace and to see these images on something like that really ties you back to the community in a way," he said.

The exhibit is also accompanied with reflection stations where people can write about their COVID-19 experiences and and submit it to the museum. He said they will keep these records as a way to "save" these stories for future community members.

There is no end date to the exhibit at this time, but Capacchione anticipates the quilt will be up throughout the summer months.

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