Rain dampens Charlottetown farmers' market, but spirits remain high for bountiful season

·2 min read
Scott Mullen, who sells honey at the outdoor market with his mom, says he's hoping the outdoor Downtown Charlottetown Farmers' Market gets busier when P.E.I. opens to the rest of Canada. (Tony Davis/CBC - image credit)
Scott Mullen, who sells honey at the outdoor market with his mom, says he's hoping the outdoor Downtown Charlottetown Farmers' Market gets busier when P.E.I. opens to the rest of Canada. (Tony Davis/CBC - image credit)

Many vendors packed up early at the Downtown Charlottetown Farmers' Market on Sunday after being battered with heavy wind and rain.

Scott Mullen, who sells honey at the outdoor market with his mom, said the booth beside him was picked up by the wind and blown across the street.

However, Mullen was prepared.

"Use concrete blocks, tie it down," Mullen said.

While rain flooded the streets instead of people Sunday, Mullen was optimistic when P.E.I. opens up to Canada on July 18 things will get busier.

"Tourists always help," he said. "More tourists from away that we had in past years really helped out. We had a lot of upper Canadians from Western Canada and Americans."

Mullen said he is hoping to see that again this year when the Island opens up.

Tony Davis/CBC
Tony Davis/CBC

Misha Saleh also has a booth at the market with her husband called Our Homestead Stall. The couple sells tomato plants, lettuce and other small produce items at the market.

Saleh said things were busier last weekend when the market opened for the first time for the summer, just as the province opened up the rest of Atlantic Canada.

"I was really happy last week," she said. "We did really well."

The business just started and wasn't around last year for the Atlantic bubble, but Saleh is also excited that opening up the Island to the rest of Canada will bring an influx of business.

"I hope it helps boost the market definitely," she said.

Tony Davis/CBC
Tony Davis/CBC

For Saleh, it isn't all about pulling tourism dollars. She believes her business appeals to locals as well.

"We're really focusing on local and supporting local and building a really nice garden and plant community here on the Island," Saleh said.

She didn't make many sales this weekend, but the rain wasn't all bad, she said

"The rain means we don't have to water the garden, so it's a little less work for us. Just have to go with the flow of nature really."

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