Rainy, snowy system heads for Atlantic Canada before a big chill

·3 min read
Rainy, snowy system heads for Atlantic Canada before a big chill
Rainy, snowy system heads for Atlantic Canada before a big chill

It’s going to be a stormy end to our weekend across Atlantic Canada as a dynamic system treks into Eastern Canada. The same system bringing slushy snow to Ontario and Quebec will arrive in the Atlantic provinces on Sunday. A big cooldown is on the way behind the system, with temperatures in the minus teens likely. More on the storm and what lies ahead, below.

SUNDAY/MONDAY: A RAINY, SNOWY SYSTEM MOVES THROUGH THE REGION

The low-pressure system bringing a burst of snow to parts of Ontario and Quebec will arrive in the Maritimes by Sunday morning.

What kind of precipitation you see depends on which side of the low you’re on. Temperatures to the south of the low will remain warm enough for mostly rain, while cooler air to the storm’s north will allow precipitation to fall as mostly snow.

ATLPrecip
ATLPrecip

Precipitation will begin during the day on Sunday, spreading across the Maritimes from west to east. The precipitation will begin as rain in parts of New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island before changing over to snow as the cooler air pushes in. The rain and snow will reach Newfoundland later Sunday and last into Monday morning.

The rain/snow divide will set up across the middle of the Maritimes, with the bulk of the heavy rain expected in Nova Scotia.

ATLRain
ATLRain

Rainfall totals of 5-10 mm are expected in southern New Brunswick and P.E.I. before the changeover to snow. Folks in Nova Scotia who see almost all rain, including Halifax, could end up with 10-20 mm by the end of the storm, with higher totals possible toward Cape Breton. Precipitation will stay mostly rain in Newfoundland, where widespread totals of 10-20 mm are expected, with heftier totals along the southern coast.

ATLSnow
ATLSnow

Farther north, where precipitation will fall as mostly snow, we can expect widespread totals of 5-10 cm of snow across the bulk of New Brunswick and P.E.I. by the end of the storm. Higher totals are possible north of Fredericton. Northern Nova Scotia could see a dusting of snow at the end of the storm. The bulk of Newfoundland’s snow will fall on the western side of the island, where sea-effect snow could lead to 10-20 cm in spots. St. John’s might see a light dusting.

TUESDAY: A BRIEF SPELL OF ARCTIC AIR PUSHES IN

Temperatures will fall in a hurry as the storm moves away from Atlantic Canada on Monday.

ATLTemps
ATLTemps

It’s going to be downright cold on Tuesday, especially compared to the warmer weather of late. High temperatures on Tuesday will struggle to climb out of the minus teens for most areas, with a forecast high of -10°C in Charlottetown and -9°C in Moncton. It’ll be a little warmer along the coast in Nova Scotia, but still below freezing with a high of -5°C in Halifax.

Atlantic Canada will see milder temperatures later in the week, though an active pattern will continue blanketing the region.

Stay tuned to The Weather Network for the latest conditions across Atlantic Canada.

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