Regina Access TV show hosts hope to help newcomers navigate life in Canada

·4 min read
(From left) Amarachi Ejike, Oge Anu, Tanwa Adanlawo and Folake Shobamowo how Regina Access TV show AnotherView. They hope the show helps other newcomers.  (Matt Duguid/CBC - image credit)
(From left) Amarachi Ejike, Oge Anu, Tanwa Adanlawo and Folake Shobamowo how Regina Access TV show AnotherView. They hope the show helps other newcomers. (Matt Duguid/CBC - image credit)

There's a new talk show in Regina and it is anchored by four proud immigrant women.

Amarachi Ejike, Tanwa Adanlawo, Oge Anu and Folake Shobamowo host AnotherView with Amarachi.

The show debuted on Access TV last month. It is a window into the lives of Canadian immigrants and a platform for sharing inspiring stories.

"We need to talk about all these things, Let's get it!" Anu was very excited to be part of a show with a focus to help people.
"We need to talk about all these things, Let's get it!" Anu was very excited to be part of a show with a focus to help people.(Matt Duguid/CBC)

Ejike, an information security professional, got the idea for the show when she realized there was no one like her on local television programming. This, coupled with a challenging life experience, inspired her to take action.

"I heard stories of how people were actually struggling. The idea was actually conceived in 2018, after my family and I went through some things," EjIke said. "It made us think about if other families were going through this and who were they talking to?"

Ejike pitched the show to Access TV. After it got picked up, she began to reach out to her fellow co-hosts to see if they wanted to take part.

For Oge Anu, a financial advisor, joining the show was an easy yes. The opportunity to have enlightening conversations on television was one she was definitely not going to pass up.

"[Amarachi] said we'll be talking about our experiences as Nigerians living in Canada, cultural differences, and I said, 'You know what? We need to talk about all these things,'" Anu said. "'Let's get it!'"

The women on the show are originally from Nigeria, but they say the issues discussed are relevant to all immigrants. They also say each one of them brings a unique perspective and life experience. Their ages span three decades and their careers are very different.

"I don’t have kids so everyone treats me like one. So to be able to share as an adult has been liberating to say the least," Adanlawo said.
"I don’t have kids so everyone treats me like one. So to be able to share as an adult has been liberating to say the least," Adanlawo said.(Matt Duguid/CBC)

Adanlawo, who is an administrative assistant, is the youngest and hopes sharing her perspective will help the older viewers understand her generation more.

"It's been nice to share my feelings about certain things because I usually can't," Adanlawo said. "I'm still a 'baby.' I don't have kids, so everyone treats me like one. So to be able to share as an adult has been liberating."

The show has touched on many topics, including the struggles of fitting into a new community, raising children, romance and interracial relationships.

It also features a segment called "Charity Spotlight" where the hosts interview representatives from organizations like Regina Open Door Society, Canadian Mental Health Association, REACH, Transition House, Big Brother Big Sister, Sexual Assault Centre, Habitat for Humanity, Cancer Foundation, Creative Options, and Regina Early Learning Centre. The show's producer, Victor Ejike, is especially proud of this segment.

"The purpose of this is dual-pronged. One is to let our audience learn about the charity and the resources they provide and the second is to promote the valuable work charities do in our community," Victor Ejike said.

Shobamowo is excited to share new information that will help make the lives of immigrants easier.
Shobamowo is excited to share new information that will help make the lives of immigrants easier.(Matt Duguid/CBC)

He said the pandemic has strained resources for many organizations.

"It is important for our audience to know how they can support the charities," he said. "And also supporting our community who may not be aware of how to find these charity resources in this COVID era when many offices are closed to the public."

Co-host Shobamowo, a business analyst, said discussing these topics has taught her so much and hopes it will do the same for others.

"We're hoping that someone will watch this and ask their kids, 'Do you feel the way Tanwa says she feels when her parents shout at her?'" Shobamowo said. "We are hoping that this leads to change and transformation."

Amarachi hopes that her show will continue to inspire immigrants and citizens all over the country.
Amarachi hopes that her show will continue to inspire immigrants and citizens all over the country.(Matt Duguid/CBC)

The show has been met with rave reviews. The hosts have been receiving messages from viewers from all over the country and abroad letting them know that the show makes them feel seen. This makes Amarachi especially happy.

"We decided to put the show out there to give us a place in Canada. Sometimes you look at the TV and you're looking for something you can relate to as an Nigerian, an African," Amarachi Ejike said. "We put this out there to make you comfortable and let you know you've got other people like you here in Canada."

AnotherView with Amarachi airs Fridays at 1:30 p.m. CST on Access TV in Regina or on The Access Now TV app from anywhere in Canada.

For more stories about the experiences of Black Canadians — from anti-Black racism to success stories within the Black community — check out Being Black in Canada, a CBC project Black Canadians can be proud of. You can read more stories here.

<cite>(CBC)</cite>
(CBC)
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