Regina constable enters peace bond following domestic-related conflict

·1 min read
Administration within the Regina Police Service is investigating one of its constables after he consented to a police bond following a domestic-related conflict.  (Tyler Pidlubny/CBC - image credit)
Administration within the Regina Police Service is investigating one of its constables after he consented to a police bond following a domestic-related conflict. (Tyler Pidlubny/CBC - image credit)

A Regina Police Service officer involved in a domestic-related conflict was placed under court-ordered conditions after entering into a peace bond.

Court documents said the constable consented to the peace bond on May 18th. A spokesperson for the Regina Police Service said administration was also investigating the matter.

The eight-year constable took personal time off and was not scheduled to work in the coming weeks.

The Criminal Code says a peace bond is used where a person appears likely to commit a criminal offence, but there are no reasonable grounds to believe an offence has been committed.

He has not been charged with a criminal offence, but breaching any condition of a peace bond is a criminal offence.

Conditions of a peace bond typically include keeping the peace and being of good behaviour and staying away from the person who requested the peace bond.

Any person who fears that another person may injure them can get a peace bond.

When a person consents to a peace bond, it is forwarded to the national RCMP Headquarters, and a record of the peace bond is added to the national Canadian Police Information Computer database, which can be used by police anywhere in Canada doing subsequent investigations.

The constable is due back in court on June 10.

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting