Rihanna teases body-positive underwear line with sexy new video

Rihanna is launching her Savage x Fenty underwear line on May 11. (Photo: Getty Images)

Fresh off her Fenty Beauty and Fenty x Puma successes, Rihanna has turned her entrepreneurial eye to a body-positive intimates line.

And unsurprisingly, it’s all kinds of amazing.

Savage x Fenty drops on May 11. Ahead of the launch, the singer has taken to Instagram to give fans a little glimpse of the lingerie, which has a real focus on inclusivity and offers a range of sizes.

A video clip reveals plus-size model Audrey Ritchie sitting on a sofa in a soft pink underwear set, and delivers the message that women should feel sexy in their smalls no matter their shape or size.

Ritchie, for instance, references her “really giant” chest.

“They were double Ds by the time I was in the eighth grade,” she says.

The accompanying caption reveals that the collection caters to a diverse range of “shapes and sizes.”

And the brand’s spirit of inclusivity extends beyond just size.

“Whichever gender you choose to have sex with, you should be proud and find yourself sexually,” Ritchie continues.


In other Instagram posts promoting the soon-to-be-launched line, RiRi herself models some of the collection, including a pink lace bodysuit and a white bra with peekaboo detailing, which she wears under a denim jacket.


Fans who can’t wait to get their hands on a set from the collection, which is available in bra sizes ranging from 32A to a 44DD, can sign up for newsletters and pre-enter their sizing information.

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