Saskatchewan Cattlemen's Association votes down motion to rebrand with gender-neutral name

·2 min read
During the Saskatchewan Cattlemen's Association annual general meeting on Feb. 1, the board debated whether the organization should change its name.
During the Saskatchewan Cattlemen's Association annual general meeting on Feb. 1, the board debated whether the organization should change its name.

(Janice Ravndahl/The Associated Press - image credit)

Board members of the Saskatchewan Cattlemen's Association (SCA) voted down a motion to change its name to something gender-neutral.

A member presented the motion during the organization's virtual annual general meeting on Feb. 1. After debate, the motion was defeated by the majority of the board.

"This isn't the first start of our conversation," SCA CEO Ryder Lee said. "It's one step of a long one that started years ago and will continue to go forward."

CBC
CBC

The Canadian Cattlemen's Association's name is not gender-neutral, but similar organizations across Canada are, like in Alberta and Manitoba where they are branded as Beef Producers.

The discussion hasn't ended

Leigh Rosengren, board member with the SCA, said the debate presented "an excellent opportunity" for the organization to have a conversation about the name, and what it means for inclusion and diversity.

"I'm not offended by the name Saskatchewan Cattlemen's Association, and I'm proud to be part of the cattle industry, but I think the conversation about inclusion and diversity and making sure that our organization is representative of our entire industry is valid," Rosengren said.

She said her call into the meeting dropped before she could vote on the motion, but that she wouldn't have voted to change the name.

"Of course I would always side with the majority of the board. That's how a board operates, and I wouldn't make any changes in retrospect," Rosengren said.

Rosengren said she believes the board is listening to its members and the way forward is through discussion.

"I don't foresee any radical changes. I think this is a continuation of a process that is ongoing for many organizations," she said.

The board will continue to learn, and access tools and training around diversity and inclusion, Lee said.

"Having these conversations is part of it, and I think it's interesting to see what conversations we have in 2021 that we might not even had one, two or three years ago," Lee said.

"A lot of conversations are like the ones we have at kitchen tables across the province. There is some awareness that things are changing. There's some comfort with that, there's some discomfort with that."