Saskatoon non-profit takes part in lip syncing competition featuring people with disabilities

·2 min read
Marin Shulz, a program assistant with L’Arche Saskatoon, says creating the music video is an enjoyable experience.   (Submitted by Marin Shulz - image credit)
Marin Shulz, a program assistant with L’Arche Saskatoon, says creating the music video is an enjoyable experience. (Submitted by Marin Shulz - image credit)

A non-profit organization in Saskatoon has created a James Bond-themed lip sync music video as part of an online competition.

The event is organized by L'Arche Canada, a disability service and support organization, and L'Arche groups from across the world are taking part.

The groups are assigned a song every week. Then they have to create a lip-syncing video to go with the song in just four days.

"The surprise element of getting the song, and not really knowing what it's going to be and then having to make a video … and the pressure of having to do it really quickly is also really fun," said Marin Shulz, a program assistant with L'Arche Saskatoon.

Once the video is completed it will be uploaded on L'Arche Canada's YouTube page. Groups get points through YouTube likes and comments. Whoever receives the most points gets to go to the next round of the competition. People can also make donations for a certain group by accessing their donation page on Canada Helps.

For the second round this week, L'Arche Saskatoon created a video lip-syncing to Paul McCartney's Live and Let Die. It features sharks, a submarine and a giant squid.

Most of the participants of the group have some form of disability, and some live in the L'Arche's group homes in the city.

"It makes me know that there's always going to be people that will be there for me," said Alecia Thompson, a participant in the competition.

Thompson also participated in a similar competition last year. She said being able to take part again this year means a lot to her. She said people are her passion and that taking part in the competition helps create friendships and builds community.

While L'Arche Saskatoon receives 90 per cent of their funding from the government, that's not the case for all of its groups. Shulz said the money people donate would go toward L'Arche communities that receive little to no government funding. It would also go toward specific projects such as building homes.

Shulz said that she thinks her group will have a pretty good chance of making it to the next round. She said the group got lots of support from the community last year.

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