Saskatoon police officer being sued for alleged sexual assault claims woman consented

·2 min read
A Saskatoon police officer says he received consent from a woman who is suing him for alleged sexual assault.
A Saskatoon police officer says he received consent from a woman who is suing him for alleged sexual assault.

(Guy Quenneville/CBC - image credit)

A Saskatoon police officer says he received consent from a woman who is suing him for alleged sexual assault.

In a statement of defence issued by Const. Patrick Skinnider's lawyer, Skinnider denies many allegations contained in Angela Skjonsby's statement of claim.

While CBC does not usually name alleged victims of sexual assault, Skjonsby said she wants her story and her experiences to be made public and agreed to be named.

Skjonsby said she was the victim of a serious domestic violence incident by her estranged husband in February 2009. Two weeks later, she reported the incident to the Saskatoon Police Service and her complaint was investigated by Const. Skinnider.

She alleges the police officer made advances toward her while in her apartment during the investigation and that he kissed her without her consent.

In her statement of claim, she said Const. Skinnider returned to the apartment the next day and forced Skjonsby to have sex with him, despite her repeatedly telling him no.

The statement of defence disputes those allegations, stating that Skinnider had consensual sexual intercourse with her and that at no time did Skjonsby withdraw her consent. He also denies kissing her during the first meeting.

Skinnider also rejects Skjonsby's claims that he later sent her an email and then went back to her apartment to apologize.

Skjonsby's statement said she accepted his apology and eventually began a relationship with Skinnider, which she claims was based on emotional and psychological manipulation due to her vulnerable emotional state. Skjonsby claims she was manipulated and that the officer abused his position of power.

Skjonsby said she has suffered depression, anxiety and post-traumatic disorder since the incident. She's suing Skinnider for general damages, but waived her claim to any amount over $30,000 to keep the matter within the jurisdiction of the Small Claims Court.

The allegations in her statement of claim have not been proven in court.

The Saskatoon Police Service said the complaint was investigated, but no charges were brought forward by the Crown prosecutor.

An internal investigation by police also followed.

In an email sent to Skjonsby in early 2020, which she shared with CBC, Det. Sgt. Pat Rathwell with the Saskatoon Police Service's professional standards unit said that Skinnider was found guilty of discreditable conduct following Skjonsby's 2009 complaint, which resulted in "several serious sanctions" against him.

Const. Skinnider is asking that the claim be dismissed with costs.

The case is scheduled to return to court Feb. 24.