Schools in North Hampshire town declare 'mud day' as buses risk getting stuck

Cheryl Santa Maria
·1 min read
Schools in North Hampshire town declare 'mud day' as buses risk getting stuck
Schools in North Hampshire town declare 'mud day' as buses risk getting stuck
Schools in North Hampshire town declare 'mud day' as buses risk getting stuck

Soggy conditions in Sanbornton, New Hampshire over the weekend led to an excess of mud on the roads, forcing officials to cancel school buses Monday because they were at risk of getting stuck.

Speaking with local news WMUR, local Superintendent Robert Seaward said he's never called a 'mud' day before, although snow days aren't out of the ordinary.

Parents living in affected areas were told they could attempt to drive their kids to school, drop their kids off at a bus stop that wasn't impacted, or opt for a remote learning day. Seaward told WMUR that between 100 and 150 students in elementary and high school were affected. A second mud day was declared Tuesday.

BLAME SPRING

Weather Network meteorologist Michael Carter says this type of melting is common in spring.

"The spring thaw is often very welcome after a long cold winter, but a rise in temperatures can bring its own complications as well. Flooding frequently occurs as large amounts of water that have been safely stored in the form of ice are suddenly released into the environment," he explains.

"This can come in the form of melting snow and ice on the surface, but there's also frozen groundwater beneath the surface that can be released as well when temperatures warm. This melting subterranean frost can combine with runoff from the surface to saturate the soil, leading to lots of mud as well as swelling of local streams and rivers."

Thumbnail image (file photo) courtesy: Jan Tancar/Pexels.