Shoe icon Steve Madden was 'particularly upset' about Trump's criticism of Colin Kaepernick

Daniel Roberts
Senior Writer

Shoe entrepreneur Steve Madden, whose eponymous company was just named Footwear News “Company of the Year” for 2017, is making the press rounds  to promote his new documentary, “Maddman: The Steve Madden Story.” And in an interview with Yahoo Lifestyle at AOL Build studio on Friday, he had some interesting things to say about President Donald Trump.

Madden, who once lived in a Trump-owned building (not Trump Tower), was asked about Trump by Yahoo Lifestyle reporter Alex Mondalek. He began with kind words: “I wish him well, I do,” he said. “I disagree with some of the stuff that he does. I wish he was more sensitive to our less fortunate… and the racial stuff. It would be more soothing for the country. I am rooting for him to do well. You know, we’re all in the country.”

He continued: “In particular, I was particularly upset about the criticism of Colin Kaepernick. I think that his kneeling is very respectful, frankly. And there’s some injustice. And I think the beauty of the National Anthem is that we have the right to express — that’s the beauty of America. That’s what the National Anthem is all about, is that you have the right. This is not a totalitarian country. And you can’t, at the foot of a boot, be forced to salute the flag. That’s the beauty of it.”

Steve Madden at AOL Build studio in NYC on Dec. 1, 2017

Trump has repeatedly called out Kaepernick, criticized his political protest, and said the NFL should have suspended him to end his protest.

In October, speaking to Sean Hannity, Trump said, “I watched Colin Kaepernick and I thought it was terrible. And then it got bigger and bigger and started mushrooming… The NFL should have suspended him for one game and he would have never done it again. They could have then suspended him for two games and they could have suspended him again, if he did it a third time, for the season. And you would have never had a problem.”

Madden’s comments are significant in a time when public companies and business leaders are increasingly being forced to take a political side on issues like the NFL player protests (which Colin Kaepernick, no longer in the league, began last season) and violent political events like the Nazi rally in Charlottesville. Last month, Papa John’s CEO John Schnatter took heat from consumers after he said on the company’s earnings call that the NFL player protests were to blame for flat pizza sales; the company later apologized in a series of tweets.

Madden, who was convicted to 41 months in prison in 2002 for stock fraud, gained widespread name recognition again from the 2013 movie “The Wolf of Wall Street.”

He later added that when he goes to sports events and the National Anthem plays, “I sing at the top of my lungs just to annoy my son. Because my dad did that with me, and I was always so embarrassed… But I just think that’s the beauty of it, we have the right to do that.”

Daniel Roberts is the sports business writer at Yahoo Finance. Follow him on Twitter at @readDanwrite.

Read more:

Poll: 71% want Trump to stay out of the NFL anthem controversy

Trump is putting NFL owners in a corner

NFL has lost fans in the past 5 years, while NBA, NHL gained

NFL commissioner: ‘We’re trying to stay out of politics’

How NFL sponsors are responding to Trump’s national anthem crusade

Donald Trump’s war on the NFL dates back to 1986

 

  • Ontario pot consumption bill passes, cannabis available through online store
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Ontario pot consumption bill passes, cannabis available through online store

    Ontario passed its cannabis legislation Wednesday, firmly establishing the right to smoke marijuana in public in the province hours after recreational use of drug became legal across Canada. The Progressive Conservative government's bill changing previously established regulations on where recreational pot can be used was put to a final vote around 4:40 p.m. after closing statements from legislators, with 69 voting in favour and 41 against. "It's a historic day," Finance Minister Vic Fedeli said in a speech to the legislature.

  • Cat calls and dark streets: Women talk about making street safer at UN forum
    News
    CBC

    Cat calls and dark streets: Women talk about making street safer at UN forum

    Jay Pitter grew up in a Toronto social housing complex with dark corners and not much green space. Pitter was a keynote speaker at an international forum being held in Edmonton this week. More than 250 delegates from 25 countries have come to discuss how to make public spaces safer for women and girls as part of the Safe Cities and Safe Public Spaces Global Leaders' Forum.

  • At Facebook, public funds join push to remove Zuckerberg as chairman
    News
    Reuters

    At Facebook, public funds join push to remove Zuckerberg as chairman

    State treasurers from Illinois, Rhode Island and Pennsylvania, and New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer, co-filed the proposal. A similar shareholder proposal seeking an independent chair was defeated in 2017 at Facebook, where Zuckerberg's majority control makes outsider resolutions effectively symbolic. Rhode Island State Treasurer Seth Magaziner said that the latest proposal was still worth filing as a way of drawing attention to Facebook's problems and how to solve them.

  • Two charged over allegations they fed bears along B.C.'s Alaska Highway
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Two charged over allegations they fed bears along B.C.'s Alaska Highway

    Two people have been charged after British Columbia's Conservation Officer Service says they posted photos of themselves on social media hand feeding Timbits and hot dogs to bears. Conservation officer Sam Harris says it's alleged the man and woman were feeding bears from their vehicle as they drove along the Alaska Highway.

  • Manitoba NDP calls for inquest into Indigenous man's death on a bus
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Manitoba NDP calls for inquest into Indigenous man's death on a bus

    The leader of Manitoba's Opposition has called for an inquest into the death of an Indigenous man who died during a 10-hour bus trip for a medical appointment. Abraham Donkey of Nisichawayasihk Cree Nation was travelling from Thompson to Winnipeg for a followup appointment after a recent heart surgery. "In a circumstance like this where he was on a bus — alone — and he had just received medical treatment, and was on his way to get further treatment, it certainly raises a lot of questions," NDP Leader Wab Kinew said Wednesday.

  • 'It feels absolutely incredible to be here': 2 hikers complete epic trek to the Arctic Ocean
    News
    CBC

    'It feels absolutely incredible to be here': 2 hikers complete epic trek to the Arctic Ocean

    Two hikers on an epic adventure across the Yukon to the Arctic Ocean have finally made it. The two were greeted at the visitors centre in Tuktoyaktuk where they were joined by locals to take pictures by the Arctic Ocean. The hikers were robbed of crucial gear at Whitehorse's Robert Service campground in July and had to come up with a new cart to carry supplies up the Dempster Highway after a custom cart didn't arrive in Dawson City.

  • Spotify takes minor stake in music distributor DistroKid
    News
    Reuters

    Spotify takes minor stake in music distributor DistroKid

    Spotify revealed the move in a blog post but did not give a dollar amount, saying only that it was "a passive minority investment." Spotify declined to comment on the size of the stake and other financial details of the deal when asked by Reuters. The move is significant because DistroKid, along with other distributors such as TuneCore or CDBaby, is the main way independent artists who are not affiliated with a major record labels get music onto streaming platforms like Apple Inc's Apple Music and Spotify. Unlike SoundCloud and YouTube, Apple Music and Spotify did not allow independent artists to upload their music directly to the service and required them to work through a distributor.

  • News
    CBC

    'We're doing the best we can': Minister defends lack of Sask. cannabis retailers operating on legalization day

    With only seven of 51 approved cannabis stores in Saskatchewan open on legalization day, the minister responsible says the delays were expected. Gene Makowsky, who is responsible for Saskatchewan Liquor and Gaming (SLGA), said Wednesday the province wanted to delay legalization but its hand was forced by Ottawa. Makowsky said there are known hurdles for businesses to get over, including permits from SLGA, municipal permits, finding a retail space, hiring staff and establishing a supplier.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Manning teams up with Bryant for NFL version of 'Detail'

    Peyton Manning will be doing analysis of NFL games this season after all. ESPN and Kobe Bryant's Granity Studios announced Wednesday that Manning will be part of a football edition of the "Detail" franchise. The eight-episode series will be on the ESPN+ streaming service and debuts on Thursday.

  • AHS failed to protect health information, privacy commissioner finds
    News
    CBC

    AHS failed to protect health information, privacy commissioner finds

    Alberta Health Services has come under fire from the province's privacy commissioner for its role in the largest and longest-duration privacy breach AHS has ever experienced. The Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner reported Wednesday that a former AHS employee who worked at Alberta Hospital Edmonton wrongfully accessed private health information of nearly 13,000 people, raising "troubling concerns" about AHS' ability to safeguard the information. The investigation found that AHS failed to ensure that the employee, who worked at Alberta Hospital Edmonton, knew about and followed safeguards designed to protect health information.

  • PHOTOS: Canada celebrates marijuana legalization with many, many puns
    Yahoo Canada News

    PHOTOS: Canada celebrates marijuana legalization with many, many puns

    Canadians from coast to coast are marking the legalization of cannabis across the country. From food companies to marijuana purchasers, pot supporters and museums, people are definitely capitalizing on hilarious weed-related marketing and social media content while celebrating their first legal puff.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Sovereigntist Quebec solidaire members refuse to swear oath to Queen in public

    The 10 members elected Oct. 1 for the sovereigntist left-wing party Quebec solidaire refused to swear allegiance to the Queen publicly Wednesday as they made their entry into the provincial legislature. In public, they declared their loyalty to the Quebec people, the second part of the oath required of all members of the national assembly. Sol Zanetti, who represents a Quebec City riding for the party, said it was "humiliating" to swear an oath that clashed with his personal convictions.

  • Very curious, slightly confused, rapper Classified tests limits of cannabis support
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Very curious, slightly confused, rapper Classified tests limits of cannabis support

    Nova Scotia rapper Classified has been a proponent of smoking marijuana for years, but he says Canada's new legalization laws have left him confused over the ways he's allowed to promote the cannabis lifestyle. "I was emailing OrganiGram going, 'you guys know I'm actually an investor so we can probably get away with advertising more.' I'm kind of curious to see what they're going to come back and say," he says, sporting a baseball cap emblazoned with a logo for the company's first recreational weed brand. Classified, whose real name is Luke Boyd, has been at the forefront of Canadian hip hop for over a decade, making him a valuable asset for young cannabis companies looking for prominent pot smokers.

  • Seven international banks agree to launch digital trade finance network
    News
    Reuters

    Seven international banks agree to launch digital trade finance network

    The Australia and New Zealand Banking Group ANZ , BNP Paribas , Citibank , Standard Chartered and Deutsche Bank also agreed to join the digital trade information network expected to be operational by the third quarter of next year. "It is the first time that these banks come together to set a standard (...) that will allow cheaper access to finance because the risks are going to be reduced," Rogier Schulpen, global head of trade and working solutions at Banco Santander, said in a phone interview. In trade finance, banks provide funding and other services to importers and exporters to facilitate commerce but each lender deals separately with clients and employs different standards.

  • 'I didn't have time to stop': C-Train driver recounts horror of hitting pedestrian
    News
    CBC

    'I didn't have time to stop': C-Train driver recounts horror of hitting pedestrian

    The fear of striking a pedestrian is one that lurks in the minds of all train drivers — and the worst case came to pass Monday in Calgary after two people died after being hit by trains. Wanda Heater, who is now retired after driving C-Trains for about 20 years, has lived that nightmare. In the late 1980s, Heater was behind the controls of a train on 7th Avenue downtown when she saw an inebriated man step out directly onto the tracks.

  • Multiple guns stolen from home in Yellowknife
    News
    CBC

    Multiple guns stolen from home in Yellowknife

    RCMP say multiple guns were stolen from a home in Yellowknife this week. The firearms were taken from a detached garage on Haener Drive, in the Niven Lake neighbourhood, between 6 p.m. Tuesday and 1:30 a.m. Wednesday, according to an RCMP news release. There were multiple guns taken from a large firearms safe in the garage.

  • Japan exports fall in September, first decline since 2016
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Japan exports fall in September, first decline since 2016

    Japan recorded a trade surplus for September of 139.6 billion yen ($1.2 billion), but exports fell 1.2 per cent from the previous year in the first decline for the world's third largest economy since 2016. A series of natural disasters took a toll, but the lag in exports also reflects uncertainties over trade tensions after President Donald Trump imposed penalty tariffs on billions of dollars' worth of Chinese exports. During the month, a major earthquake hit the northernmost island of Hokkaido, causing fatal landslides and widespread blackouts, while a typhoon struck the western Kansai area and temporarily shut down a major airport.

  • Avoid these pot pitfalls
    Yahoo Canada Original Videos

    Avoid these pot pitfalls

    Confusing rules across Canada could accidentally get you in trouble

  • Italy's Salvini says may run for EU Commission presidency: paper
    News
    Reuters

    Italy's Salvini says may run for EU Commission presidency: paper

    MILAN (Reuters) - Italian Deputy Prime Minister Matteo Salvini, head of the League party, was quoted as saying he may consider running for the presidency of the European Commission at the next elections. "It's true, friends from several European countries are asking me to," Salvini told la Repubblica daily in an interview. "May is still far away. We will see, I'll think about it." The next European elections are due May 23–26. Salvini, who was visiting Russia, also reiterated that Italy would oppose renewing indefinitely sanctions against Moscow. ...

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Gov. Gen. Julie Payette set for first official visit to Saskatchewan

    Gov. Gen. Julie Payette is to make her first official visit to Saskatchewan today and take in a Humboldt Broncos hockey game this weekend. Payette is to meet with Premier Scott Moe. On Friday, the former astronaut will tour a Canadian Forces Base in Moose Jaw — the same base where she obtained her military pilot captaincy on the Tutor CT-114 "Snowbird" jet in the 1990s.

  • Price of getting high too much for some Sask. pot shoppers
    News
    CBC

    Price of getting high too much for some Sask. pot shoppers

    It was the burning question for Saskatchewan residents eager to mark the legalization of cannabis with a purchase: how much? With a lack of supply leaving Saskatoon and Regina shops unable to open their doors on Oct. 17, residents travelled to neighbouring communities to satisfy their curiosity — and their cravings. "Oh, they're high compared to what you get off the street, for sure," said Alderson, at the Eden store in the RM of Edenwold, about 30 kilometres northeast of Regina.

  • News
    Reuters

    China robot market growth to slump this year as trade war weighs

    Sales of industrial robots in China, the world's biggest market, will grow this year at only about a third of last year as an escalating Sino-U.S. trade war hits spending on equipment, a global robot group said on Thursday. The International Federation of Robotics (IFR) in its annual report forecast Chinese demand for robots will grow 15-20 percent this year after surging 59 percent to 137,920 units last year. With China accounting for 36 percent of the global robot market and with its sales volume exceeding the total of Europe and the Americas combined, slowing demand growth in the Asian nation is also impacting global demand.

  • UK's May open to the idea of extending Brexit transition by a few months: BBC reporter
    News
    Reuters

    UK's May open to the idea of extending Brexit transition by a few months: BBC reporter

    Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May is open to the idea of extending the transition period "for a few months", BBC Political Editor Laura Kuenssberg said on Twitter. EU leaders have raised the possibility that the post-Brexit transition period, during which Britain would retain EU rules, could be extended by a year as a way to give London more time to agree the EU-UK customs deal it wants to solve the issue of the Irish border.

  • Gwich'in Tribal Council cuts 2 directors, 1 manager, citing budget shortfalls
    News
    CBC

    Gwich'in Tribal Council cuts 2 directors, 1 manager, citing budget shortfalls

    The Gwich'in Tribal Council has laid off two of its directors and a manager because of a budget shortfall, according to a press release issued Tuesday. No-one in the organization was made available to explain the budget shortfall. The organization declined a request for interviews with either Gwich'in Tribal Council (GTC) grand chief Bobbie Jo Greenland-Morgan or vice president Jordan Peterson about whether or not any other cuts had been mode or further cuts were expected.

  • Putting seatbelts on school buses a 'money issue,' former N.L. operator says
    News
    CBC

    Putting seatbelts on school buses a 'money issue,' former N.L. operator says

    A former school bus operator in western Newfoundland says seatbelts aren't being added into school buses because of cost. "It's very much a money issue," Dave Callahan said. "The minute that they adopt school buses having seatbelts in them, they're going to require at least a third more buses in this province because there will no longer be three [students] to a seat.