Singer Dua Lipa sends United Airlines a savage tweet about how it dealt with her sister's peanut allergy

Dua Lipa performs onstage during Billboard and Mastercard present a night with Dua Lipa at the Mastercard House on Jan. 27, 2018, in New York City. (Photo: Christopher Polk/Getty Images for Mastercard)

Singer Dua Lipa is not impressed with how a flight attendant handled her sister’s peanut allergy on a recent United Airlines flight. The “IDGAF” singer apparently does give one “F,” and it was enough to inspire tweets directed at the company.

Lipa wrote that when the flight attendant was informed of her sister Rina’s severe peanut allergy, he told her, “We’re not a nut free airline so if she has an [EpiPen] she might have to use that.” He also added, “We can’t not serve other passengers in your section nuts.”


A fan of the 22-year-old singer said that the attendant could have made an announcement suggesting there was a person with a severe allergy on the flight, but Lipa wrote that they did not.



United Airlines’ allergy policy states that flight attendants can request other customers “seated nearby to refrain from opening and eating any allergen-containing products,” but they do that only “in some cases.”

United Airlines responded to the singer on Twitter, saying that it “can’t guarantee an allergen-free environment” and that it wanted to touch base once the singer reached her destination to address her concerns.


In some severe cases of nut allergies, a person can have a reaction if someone nearby is eating peanuts. In one instance, a young woman died after she kissed her boyfriend who had eaten a peanut butter sandwich.

If you are worried about flying with an allergy, it is recommended that you call to inform the airline of your situation and to read its policies online. It’s also recommended to get a letter from your doctor that confirms your allergy. You should make sure to pack your own EpiPens (medical devices that inject epinephrine to treat allergic reactions) and remind the cabin crew of your allergy.

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