Six stories in the news for today, Sept. 26

Six stories in the news for today, Sept. 26

Six stories in the news for Tuesday, Sept. 26

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LABOUR STANDARDS TAKE SPOTLIGHT AT NAFTA TALKS

Labour standards are on the agenda today and tomorrow at the third round of NAFTA negotiations in Ottawa. Canada wants to see enforceable, progressive labour standards in a new trade pact and an end to right-to-work laws in the U.S. Under those laws, workers in 28 states have the right to refuse to join or pay dues to a union while enjoying the benefits of a unionized workplace.

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NOVA SCOTIA TO BOOST HEALTH CARE IN BUDGET

Nova Scotia's health care system is expected to get a boost today when the Liberal government reintroduces a budget that was shelved because of the May 30 provincial election campaign. In its throne speech last week, the government acknowledged a need for better access to primary care, along with a reduction in wait times and more mental health supports. Premier Stephen McNeil has said that the budget will largely be the same one presented on April 27 with "add ons" specifically targeting health care needs.

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BOMBARDIER BRACING FOR POSSIBLE ONE-TWO PUNCH

Bombardier faces the prospect of a double dose of bad news today. The first hit could come from Europe with word of a possible deal to merge Germany's railway manufacturer Siemens with Alstom of France, leaving Bombardier out in the cold. The other bad news could come when the U.S. Department of Commerce announces a decision on imposing preliminary countervailing duties on sales of CSeries planes. The White House is widely expected to back Boeing's petition.

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SECOND ROUND OF MMIW HEARINGS BEGIN TODAY

A second round of hearings is set to begin in central B.C. today at the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women. Inquiry commissioner Michele Audette says she's expecting testimony from the more than 40 people who have signed up to speak in Smithers over the next three days. The inquiry is set to visit nine communities this fall, including Edmonton, Winnipeg and Thunder Bay, Ont.

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REPORT: IMAGES OF SEXUAL ABUSE HAUNTS VICTIMS

Victims of childhood sexual abuse often suffer great distress over the fact video or pictures of the crimes are circulating in cyberspace — adding to the pain they already experience, says a new report. The existence of images that may still be possessed by the abuser or publicly available for others to see has "an enormously negative impact" on victims, says the report by the Canadian Centre for Child Protection, a national charity that fights child exploitation.

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CITRUS COSTS COULD CLIMB DUE TO IRMA

The price of your morning glass of orange juice may jump in the coming weeks, experts say, after hurricane Irma left some of Florida's citrus producers completely depleted. Adam Putnam, the state's commissioner of agriculture, says about 70 to 100 per cent of orange crops were lost in the state's south-west. Canada imported nearly nine-million kilograms of oranges from Florida last year.

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ALSO IN THE NEWS TODAY:

— A trial is scheduled for two men who are alleged to have attacked Dennis Oland at a prison in New Brunswick.

— NDP MP Linda Duncan holds a news conference in Ottawa to discuss the national opioid crisis.

— The Union of Canadian Correctional Officers will hold a news conference in Ottawa to discuss post-traumatic stress disorder.

— The Fraser Institute releases a study regarding the impact of federal personal income tax changes on middle income families.

— The Invictus Games continue in Toronto through Saturday.

 

The Canadian Press