Snow, freezing rain warnings issued for parts of New Brunswick

·1 min read
Snowfall warnings have been issued for central regions of the province while freezing rain warnings have been issued for areas along the Fundy coastline. Northern areas should also monitor the special weather statement for changing conditions.
Snowfall warnings have been issued for central regions of the province while freezing rain warnings have been issued for areas along the Fundy coastline. Northern areas should also monitor the special weather statement for changing conditions.

(Ryan Snoddon/CBC - image credit)

Environment Canada has issued snowfall and freezing rain warnings for parts of New Brunswick as a system bringing snow and ice pellets is expected on Tuesday.

Snow is expected to begin overnight across the region and into the early hours of Tuesday morning before changing to freezing rain.

"For areas along the Fundy coastline, that snow will start to mix with ice pellets through mid to late Tuesday morning hours," said CBC Meteorologist Ryan Snoddon.

Ryan Snoddon/CBC
Ryan Snoddon/CBC

"As we move into Tuesday afternoon, ice pellets will take over across most of the south, including Fredericton and freezing rain will begin along the Fundy coastline."

Snoddon said the messy icy mix will continue across southern New Brunswick through Tuesday evening, before becoming a few flurries and then slowly tapering off.

"The heaviest ice build up is expected along that Fundy coastline area, where 6 to 12 hours of freezing rain is expected," he said.

Ryan Snoddon/CBC
Ryan Snoddon/CBC

Meanwhile, across northern areas of the province, snow will continue throughout the day and 15 to 25 centimetres.

Environment Canada cautions freezing rain will bring ice build-up and may cause surfaces like highways, roads, walkways and parking lots will become icy, slippery and hazardous.

It also warns New Brunswickers to prepare for quickly changing and deteriorating travel conditions and to continue monitoring alerts and forecasts as the system approaches.

Ryan Snoddon/CBC
Ryan Snoddon/CBC