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Mark Zuckerberg

The Facebook founder dropped out of Harvard, so his parents were pretty proud when he addressed Harvard’s graduating class of 2017 and received an honorary Doctor of Laws degree: “Mom, I always told you I’d come back and get my degree.” (Photo: Mark Zuckerberg via Instagram)

Social Snaps (Week of May 21, 2017)

Rebecca Detken
Managing Editor, Yahoo Celebrity

See the best pics the stars are sharing on social media.

  • Dark family secrets: Anonymous letter uncovers child welfare records
    News
    CBC

    Dark family secrets: Anonymous letter uncovers child welfare records

    Like any other day, Kelly Courtoreille Wright checked her mailbox when she got to work, but what she found inside it changed her life. Courtoreille Wright was a maternal child health worker for the North Peace Tribal Council in High Level, 740 kilometres northwest of Edmonton. "It was like, holy crap," Courtoreille Wright told CBC News.

  • Big lobster landings and high sales growth, but trouble on the horizon for P.E.I. processors
    News
    CBC

    Big lobster landings and high sales growth, but trouble on the horizon for P.E.I. processors

    P.E.I. manufacturing sales from January to November of 2017 were up 8.2 per cent over the same period the previous year. Lobster landings were up and prices were as well with improving export markets, but Dennis King, executive director of the P.E.I. Seafood Processors Association, said the busy year brought the industry a little bit closer to a looming labour crisis. "It's been a very difficult year in many regards, simply because there was a very high volume of landed lobster products and we still struggle with some of our labour issues," King said.

  • N.L. athlete admits to killing man, but argues she is not criminally responsible
    News
    The Canadian Press

    N.L. athlete admits to killing man, but argues she is not criminally responsible

    The jury in the Newfoundland and Labrador Supreme Court case was told Norris killed 46-year-old Marcel Reardon by striking him multiple times with a hammer. Norris was named to the women's under-19 basketball team competing for Newfoundland and Labrador at the junior national championships in 2005.

  • Canadian veteran reunited with boy he befriended in Bosnia decades ago
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Canadian veteran reunited with boy he befriended in Bosnia decades ago

    A Canadian veteran of the Bosnian war who reconnected with a local boy he met during the conflict says meeting him again and finding out he's doing well two decades later has been one of the best experiences of his life. Justin Frye, who was posted in the war-torn area with the United Nations in 1994, said meeting the now 34-year-old man, Amir Bajramovic, provides a sense of closure after that tumultuous time in his life. Frye befriended Bajramovic over a six-month period, when a number of Bosnian children would run up to a fence near his helicopter landing zone to interact with him and other soldiers.

  • 'We don't have many castles in Calgary,' and this one's for sale
    News
    CBC

    'We don't have many castles in Calgary,' and this one's for sale

    One of Calgary's most unusual properties is on the market. It has cream-coloured stone walls, a lookout tower and mint-green battlements on the outer walls, not to mention the six spiral staircases. "We don't have many castles in Calgary," said realtor Daniel LeBlanc.

  • Lower U.S. business taxes, uncertainty over NAFTA complicate Trudeau's investment pitch in Davos
    News
    CBC

    Lower U.S. business taxes, uncertainty over NAFTA complicate Trudeau's investment pitch in Davos

    One of Canada's central aims at this year's World Economic Forum is to convince global business leaders that Canada is still an attractive place to invest. It is a challenge made all the more difficult because of the uncertainties posed by ongoing NAFTA negotiations and recent cuts to U.S. corporate and business rates that threaten Canada's competitive advantages. "Davos is not an internationally sanctioned body of economic decision makers, like the IMF or World Bank," said Laura Dawson, director of the Canada Institute at the Wilson Center in Washington, D.C.

  • Murder charge dropped for 2nd time against man accused of killing mother
    News
    CBC

    Murder charge dropped for 2nd time against man accused of killing mother

    John (Jack) Buckley appeared in Nova Scotia Supreme Court in Bridgewater this morning, where a charge of first-degree murder was withdrawn after the Crown announced it would call no evidence in the case. The dismissal of the case can be traced to Friday, when Justice Josh Arnold ruled on the admissibility of some evidence the Crown wanted to use in Buckley's trial, scheduled to begin this morning. Arnold ruled the jury would not be permitted to hear the results of a police undercover operation against Buckley, commonly known as a Mr. Big sting.

  • How Canadians would know about an incoming missile attack
    News
    Yahoo Canada News

    How Canadians would know about an incoming missile attack

    You don’t have cable television and you only listen to live radio in the car. How do you find out about an imminent threat to your life like, say, the nuclear missile attack Hawaiians thought was coming during a false alarm on Jan. 13? Most Canadians have heard the shrill call of the emergency alert tone on television or over the radio.

  • Thousands of Sask. patients could benefit from new technology replacing colonoscopies
    News
    CBC

    Thousands of Sask. patients could benefit from new technology replacing colonoscopies

    The $200,000 machine will prevent patients with inflammatory bowel disease, such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, from needing to have invasive colonoscopy procedures. The monitoring they need can now be completed with an intestinal ultrasound, providing instant results at the patient's bedside. Dr. Tom Guzowski, an assistant professor of gastroenterology and internal medicine at the University of Saskatchewan, said intestinal ultrasound is a new technique in Canada that is only being used at two other universities in Calgary and Toronto.

  • Syrian family settling into new Bedeque home
    News
    CBC

    Syrian family settling into new Bedeque home

    It's been a long road from Zabadani, Syria to Bedeque, P.E.I. for Bassam Antoun and his family. The family was forced to flee in 2012 from war-torn Zabadani, a city of 26,000 hit hard hard by the Syrian civil war. Antoun, along with his wife and three children fled to Damascus where they would live for a year before packing up their few belongings and relocating to Lebanon.

  • Brady leads Patriots back to Super Bowl, top Jaguars 24-20
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Brady leads Patriots back to Super Bowl, top Jaguars 24-20

    Give 'em a hand: Tom Brady and the New England Patriots are heading back to the Super Bowl. Brady shook off a hand injury and threw a 4-yard touchdown pass to Danny Amendola with 2:48 remaining , rallying the Patriots to a 24-20 comeback victory over the Jacksonville Jaguars in the AFC championship Sunday. Brady, wearing a black bandage on his right hand after needing stitches to close a cut that happened on a play during practice earlier in the week, showed no signs of being hampered.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    One dead, one still missing as family swept away in Vancouver Island creek

    Searchers on Vancouver Island are hopeful but admit they are bracing for the worst after three people on a family outing on an all-terrain vehicle were swept away while crossing a creek near Campbell River. Area residents heard screams and pulled one female from Woods Creek on Sunday, and Paul Berry with Comox Valley Ground Search and Rescue said a search was launched for two others, a male and female. Berry said the body of one person was found just before search efforts were called off Sunday night and there was extreme concern for the person who was still missing.

  • One of Toronto's oldest theatres is up for sale and some are banding together to save it
    News
    CBC

    One of Toronto's oldest theatres is up for sale and some are banding together to save it

    One of Toronto's oldest movie theatres is up for sale and some residents in Davisville are hoping to save it before it's too late. The Regent Theatre has been a longtime institution in the neighbourhood, operating in one capacity or another since the 1920s. Sharon Mourer, chair of the heritage committee for the South Eglinton Resident's Association, has lived in the area for nearly three decades and says the nearly century-old neighbourhood is coming of age.

  • Ontario landlords call for right to immediately ban pot in rentals despite tenant laws
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Ontario landlords call for right to immediately ban pot in rentals despite tenant laws

    Ontario landlords want the right to immediately ban the use of pot in rental properties when recreational weed is legalized this summer, arguing they should be allowed to change tenants' existing leases to stop the drug from being consumed in their units. Some marijuana users say, however, that the situation would leave renters with few places to legally use weed, given the province's already restrictive rules around the drug. Medical marijuana use will be permitted anywhere that cigarette smoking is allowed, the legislation says.

  • 96 victim impact statements entered in sentencing for killer of Winnipeg teen
    News
    The Canadian Press

    96 victim impact statements entered in sentencing for killer of Winnipeg teen

    A sentencing hearing for a Winnipeg man who admitted he murdered a teenager and stuffed his body in a garbage bin will go ahead with all 96 victim impact statements. Justice Glenn Joyal has ruled all the submissions are admissible, but only 16 from family and close friends will be read aloud in court. Nicholas Bell-Wright, who was 22 when he was charged, was to face a sentencing hearing last week after pleading guilty to second-degree murder in the shooting of Cooper Nemeth in February 2016.

  • Blizzard causes snow day on B.C. ski resort
    Yahoo Canada Original Videos

    Blizzard causes snow day on B.C. ski resort

    More than a metre of snow fell on Vancouver Island's Mount Washington, forcing resort officials to close their venue for a day.

  • News
    CBC

    Michelle Obama to speak in Calgary in March

    ​Calgarians will have a chance to spend an evening with former U.S. first lady Michelle Obama in March. Obama is scheduled to speak at a Calgary Chamber of Commerce event at the Stampede Corral on March 23 at 7 p.m. "Michelle Obama has had an incredibly successful career. This is somebody who graduated near the top of her class from Princeton University, worked in law, worked in the [Chicago] mayor's office, and then spent eight years as the first lady of the United States, so I think her accomplishments really speak for themselves," Scott Crockatt, communications chair for the chamber, told the Calgary Eyeopener.

  • 'It's still fresh': Father of last bystander killed in Vancouver shooting reflects on daughter's death
    News
    CBC

    'It's still fresh': Father of last bystander killed in Vancouver shooting reflects on daughter's death

    Bruce Davis says reading the news about the shooting death of 15-year old Alfred Wong brings painful memories. Prior to Wong's death, Davis' daughter Rachel was the last bystander to be shot in Vancouver according to the Vancouver Police Department. In the years after his daughter died, Davis spent months researching the issue of guns and gang-related violence, speaking to law enforcement, prosecutors, and criminal justice system experts.

  • Winnipeg mother relieved she'll get her citizenship back
    News
    CBC

    Winnipeg mother relieved she'll get her citizenship back

    ​A Winnipeg mother, who received a letter from the government telling her she wasn't entitled to Canadian citizenship, has since been told she'll be able to resume her Canadian identity. "I'm glad I get to stay," said Anneliese Demos, who hails from Paraguay and has lived in Canada since she was two-years-old. On Friday Demos got a one-paragraph email from an analyst with Immigration Refugees and Citizenship Canada telling her the news — five days after CBC News published a story about her ordeal with the department.

  • Focus shifts to executions in Japan's 1995 sarin gas attack
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Focus shifts to executions in Japan's 1995 sarin gas attack

    More than two decades after poison gas attacks in Tokyo's subways killed 13, the stage has shifted to the execution of 13 people convicted in the crime. When they will be sent to the gallows, though, remains a mystery in Japan's highly secretive death penalty system. The Supreme Court rejected an appeal in the final case last week, so the condemned are no longer needed as potential trial witnesses.

  • Edmonton girl, 3, suffers serious injury to her hand due to botched IV line, mother says
    News
    CBC

    Edmonton girl, 3, suffers serious injury to her hand due to botched IV line, mother says

    An Edmonton mother is worried her three-year-old daughter, who is recovering from open-heart surgery, sustained lifelong damage to her hand after a misplaced IV line caused the tissue to blister and decay. Jalena Gunther's daughter, Emmy, underwent surgery to repair a hole in her heart at the Stollery Children's Hospital on Tuesday. An hour later, Emmy started fussing and crying.

  • Ex-train engineer Tom Harding apologizes for his role in Lac-Megantic derailment
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Ex-train engineer Tom Harding apologizes for his role in Lac-Megantic derailment

    The former train engineer recently acquitted of criminal negligence in the Lac-Megantic railway disaster apologized Monday in a rare public statement since the 2013 tragedy that claimed the lives of dozens in the small Quebec town. With visibly quivering lips and flanked on each side by his lawyers, Tom Harding read a short, prepared statement in French and in English before the cameras. "I do not find the words sufficient to express my sympathies," said Harding, who was found not guilty Friday along with two former railway colleagues of criminal negligence causing death.

  • News
    CBC

    Two major fires break out in Montreal overnight

    Police say a witness saw a car go through one of the building's garage doors before catching fire. To the south, at about 2:25 a.m., firefighters were dispatched to Crémazie Boulevard on the corner of Lajeunesse Street, where a fire engulfed a building with a daycare on its main floor. Firefigthers were unable to determine what caused the fire and have transferred the investigation to Montreal police.

  • Philippine volcano explodes, villagers flee back to shelters
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Philippine volcano explodes, villagers flee back to shelters

    The Philippines' most active volcano ejected a huge column of lava fragments, ash and smoke in a thunderous explosion Monday, sending thousands of villagers back to evacuation centres and prompting a warning that a violent eruption may be imminent. The midday explosion sent superheated lava, molten rocks and steam between 3.5 to 5 kilometres (2 to 3 miles) into the blue sky, and then some cascaded down Mount Mayon's slopes and shrouded nearby villages in darkness, Renato Solidum of the Philippine Institute of Seismology and Volcanology and other officials said.

  • 15-year-old girl shot at Texas school; boy, 16, arrested
    News
    The Canadian Press

    15-year-old girl shot at Texas school; boy, 16, arrested

    A 15-year-old student in Texas was injured in a shooting in her high school cafeteria Monday morning and a 16-year-old boy, also a student at the school, was taken into custody, sheriff's officials said. The girl was airlifted to Parkland Memorial Hospital in Dallas following the shooting in the small town of Italy, some 45 miles (70 kilometres ) south of Dallas, said Sgt. Joe Fitzgerald of the Ellis County Sheriff's Office. The shooting happened at about 7:50 a.m. in the Italy High School cafeteria.