Snow squalls linger into Friday as Arctic air floods Ontario

·2 min read
Snow squalls linger into Friday as Arctic air floods Ontario
Snow squalls linger into Friday as Arctic air floods Ontario

Lake-effect snow squalls triggered warnings for communities on or inland of Lake Huron, Georgian Bay and eastern Lake Superior Thursday, and in southern areas, shifting bands of snow may persist until Friday before easing. Beyond, the weekend looks cool and unsettled. A closer look, below.

INTO FRIDAY: LAKE-EFFECT SNOW DEVELOPS, RISK OF REDUCED VISIBILITY

Cold westerly winds blowing over the still unfrozen Great Lakes triggered lake-effect snow bands Thursday, beginning in the morning off of Lake Superior and the afternoon in communities in the usual snow belts near Lake Huron and Georgian Bay.

While lingering rainfall limited the amounts near the shores of Lake Superior, in the south, some areas may be in line for 10-20 cm of snow before completely winding down through the day Friday.

ON Snow
ON Snow

"Travel may be hazardous due to sudden changes in the weather. Visibility may be suddenly reduced at times in heavy snow," warns Environment and Climate Change Canada in a snow squall warning. "Surfaces such as highways, roads, walkways and parking lots may become difficult to navigate due to accumulating snow. Road closures are possible."

WEEKEND: NEAR SEASONAL TEMPERATURES, BUT WITH UNSETTLED CONDITIONS

The weekend features near-seasonal temperatures, though capped off with some rain, as a fall storm tracks through the northern Great Lakes, bringing a period of wet and windy weather across southern Ontario Sunday afternoon and evening, and then across eastern Ontario through Monday.

Meanwhile, a second low-pressure system is expected to develop off the coast of the northeastern U.S., with the potential to rapidly intensify as it slowly tracks northeast towards the Maritimes mid-week.

"The exact track and how the two storms interact is still uncertain but we're watching the potential for a band of heavy snow on the back side of the coastal low – which could extend into parts of Quebec," says Dr. Doug Gillham, a meteorologist at The Weather Network. "Lake-effect snow will develop east and southeast of the Great Lakes with significant snow totals possible."

Be sure to check back for updates on the forecast in Ontario.

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