'How is he still in power?'

 A protest against Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is seen in Jerusalem.
A protest against Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is seen in Jerusalem.

'Israelis have had enough of Netanyahu'

Frida Ghitis at CNN 

Even if the attacks of Oct. 7 never happened, Benjamin Netanyahu "had already inflicted serious damage to his country," and that day only "underscored how lacerating his self-serving policies had become," says Frida Ghitis. Staying in power "became his top priority; higher, I believe, than the interests of the country." While he has been "largely successful politically," Netanyahu's personal style and alleged corruption turned many Israelis against him. Peace is unlikely to happen "as long as Netanyahu remains in power."

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'Mexico's election of Claudia Sheinbaum is historic. But should we be celebrating it?'

Kristina Foltz at the Los Angeles Times

Mexico "has elected its first female president, a historic event that should be cause for celebration," says Kristina Foltz. But Claudia Sheinbaum "is too steeped in [political party] Morena methodology to make real progress for Mexico." Sheinbaum was "born into an elite family with a history of financial opacity." Populists like Sheinbaum are " no friends" to Mexico, and her election "means we're still waiting for the arrival of Mexico's democratic spring."

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'Don't blame voters for a far-right surge in Europe. Blame the far-right's mainstream copycats'

Matthijs Rooduijn at the Guardian

Far-right parties in Europe "are as radical as ever," and voters "are no less trusting of their politicians and parliaments than they were three decades ago," says Matthijs Rooduijn. What has shifted is "not their ideologies, but that parties and voters have been driven into each other's arms." The far-right is still just as extreme, and "only their image has changed." The evolving media landscape "has further helped far-right parties spread their message" across the EU.

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'The ugly discourse surrounding Caitlin Clark'

Candace Buckner at The Washington Post 

Caitlin Clark is the "singular star uplifting an entire women’s sports movement that only now matters because men are watching," says Candace Buckner. The physical contact against her "takes on a greater meaning" because "she is a minefield, whose explosions are triggered by our worst inclinations." Although she "has unprecedented power, Caitlin Clark, somehow, is the one in need of our protection." But Clark "doesn't need to be coddled, especially when her army of supporters are the ones throwing a tantrum."

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