Stocks struggle to hold gains as tax bill hits a snag

Stocks (^DJI^GSPC, ^IXIC) are sideways to down after yesterday’s record highs. The consumer staples (XLP) and real estate (XLRE) sectors are the most in the green, and the financial (XLF) sector is most in the red. Keith Bliss of Cuttone and Company joins us live from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange to talk markets. To discuss the other big stories of the day, Alexis Christoforous is joined by Yahoo Finance’s Pras Subramanian and Dan Roberts. Alexis also talks with Yahoo Finance tech critic David Pogue about the differences in HD and 4K TV. Dan Roberts interviews Bridgestone Gold CEO Angel Ilagan about Tiger Woods’ return to the to competitive golfing world. 

  • Getting around Trump: Trudeau focuses on other 'levers' to end tariffs
    News
    CBC

    Getting around Trump: Trudeau focuses on other 'levers' to end tariffs

    After months of fruitless efforts with the Trump White House, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau appears ready to make Canada's case for the lifting of steel and aluminum tariffs directly to allies in Congress and across the U.S., as U.S. workers and businesses also feel the sting of the border taxes. In a wide-ranging interview with The National's Rosemary Barton that airs Sunday, Trudeau talked about the duties that were slapped on Canada, supposedly because steel and aluminum posed a risk to U.S. national security — and his game plan to have them removed.

  • 'My nightmare began again': Close call as bus carrying Humboldt crash survivor rear-ended
    News
    The Canadian Press

    'My nightmare began again': Close call as bus carrying Humboldt crash survivor rear-ended

    A terrifying ordeal for Humboldt Broncos survivor Ryan Straschnitzki this past week as the bus carrying him home from physiotherapy was rear-ended by a truck. Straschnitzki, who was paralyzed from the chest down in the accident, has been attending physio four times a week in Calgary. To Ryan, and, ultimately Tom and I (on the other side of his SOS call), it was devastating," his mother Michelle Straschnitzki wrote on Facebook.

  • Elite private school announced for Annapolis County
    News
    CBC

    Elite private school announced for Annapolis County

    It will be a franchise of the Gordonstoun School in Scotland. Notable alumni of the school include Prince Charles and his father, Prince Philip. As well, Premier Stephen McNeil said in an interview the province has not made a financial commitment to the project.

  • 'La lista': For some U.S.-bound migrants it means hope. For others, despair
    News
    CBC

    'La lista': For some U.S.-bound migrants it means hope. For others, despair

    Every morning in Plaza Viva Tijuana, Mexico, volunteers set up a blue tent, unfold a plastic table, and open up a silver-and-black ledger. And every morning the migrants come — hundreds of them —  with their children and their belongings, hoping this will be the day the man with the ledger reads out their name.

  • Ottawa Food Bank heads north to deliver food to Iqaluit
    News
    CBC

    Ottawa Food Bank heads north to deliver food to Iqaluit

    The Ottawa Food Bank is heading north with the help of a northern airline this holiday season to deliver 4,500 kilograms of food to Iqaluit, which saw one of its two grocery stores devastated by a fire in November. There are people in their communities that can't always afford to eat healthy food," Lewis said.

  • Rapper 2 Milly on why he's suing makers of video game Fortnite over dance moves
    News
    CBC

    Rapper 2 Milly on why he's suing makers of video game Fortnite over dance moves

    Rapper 2 Milly's lawsuit against the makers of the wildly popular video game Fortnite is raising questions about whether unique choreography can be copyrighted. Fortnite, a free, award-winning battle royale game which has become a cultural phenomenon since it was released in 2017, includes the contentious groove as one of its "emotes," or personalized dances.

  • 1st Amish settlement west of Ontario prepares for Prairie winter in quiet Manitoba town
    News
    CBC

    1st Amish settlement west of Ontario prepares for Prairie winter in quiet Manitoba town

    Months after the first Amish families in Manitoba started arriving in the town of Vita, the sight of their horse-drawn buggies rolling down the highway still draws crowds to the windows. "People are always quite excited to see them," said Eva Dyck, who owns Eva's Restaurant along the town's main highway. In April, a group of 11 families began arriving by charter bus from southern Ontario, which until recently had been the main home for Canada's Amish population.

  • Rosemount library reno could get $400K boost
    News
    CBC

    Rosemount library reno could get $400K boost

    Residents of Ottawa's Hintonburg neighbourhood will get a peek at updated renovation plans for their century-old public library branch this week, including a glassed-in reading room that will function as a "beacon" to the community. The Rosemount branch of the Ottawa Public Library (OPL) is already in line for a $2-million renovation next year, but architects have found they can only do so much within that budget. In a report to the OPL board, staff say they've asked the architects to include additional features including an extra 150 square feet of floor space on the main level, more windows for natural light and improved seating.

  • Demolition begins at Dunrobin Plaza, but future still unclear
    News
    CBC

    Demolition begins at Dunrobin Plaza, but future still unclear

    The demolition of the tornado-struck Dunrobin Plaza began on Wednesday, but there is still a big question mark surrounding when it will reopen. Michael Fines, a co-owner of the well-known Dunrobin Meat and Grocery, said he was hoping for the demolition to be completed by Friday. Blueprint Properties Inc. — the company responsible for the demolition — said they had to wait to get permits from the city in order to begin the work.

  • Feds still encountering training issues years after Phoenix launch
    News
    CBC

    Feds still encountering training issues years after Phoenix launch

    Nearly three years after launching the Phoenix pay system, the federal government is still trying to fix training issues. Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) recently asked the private sector to help find solutions — news which came as a surprise to unions representing public servants. "One of the identified challenges present in the existing environment is the lack of training material for the [human resources] and pay systems and the efficacy of the existing training materials," reads the document.

  • North Shore Rescue ties record for number of calls in one year at 139
    News
    CBC

    North Shore Rescue ties record for number of calls in one year at 139

    The search and rescue outfit that ensures safety on the North Shore mountains has tied a record for the number of calls received in one year. The record was tied Saturday after two calls came in concerning two hikers who had fallen and injured themselves. The last time that number of calls was reached was in 2015.

  • Family of Nadia Atwi post $50K reward one year after her disappearance
    News
    CBC

    Family of Nadia Atwi post $50K reward one year after her disappearance

    On Saturday, the family marked a year since Nadia's disappearance by posting a $50,000 reward for information leading to her whereabouts. "Just think about your mom, your sister, your daughter, your friends," Salwa said. Friends and family described Nadia as a vibrant woman, who could charm a room with her sense of humour and her laugh.

  • Peer team to help Coast Guard, DFO employees after traumatic events
    News
    CBC

    Peer team to help Coast Guard, DFO employees after traumatic events

    Coast Guard and Fisheries and Oceans employees in the Atlantic provinces who are involved in stressful incidents such as search and rescue or recovering bodies will soon have a team of trained peers to help them through difficult times. The two federal entities are creating a critical-incident stress management team that will offer help within 24 hours of an incident, such as a capsized vessel or plane crash. The team will discuss what happened, how the employee is feeling and determine whether further help is needed.

  • Doctor's orders: 'Social prescriptions' have been shown to improve health
    News
    CBC

    Doctor's orders: 'Social prescriptions' have been shown to improve health

    Doctors may be used to prescribing traditional medicine and treatments, but in a new pilot program they now have the option to prescribe "social prescriptions" — activities that promote social connections and strengthen community bonds. The idea was test run over the summer by the Rexdale Community Health Centre with about 500 participants. "It was an opportunity for them to connect with new people and have new experiences," said Safia Ahmed, executive director of the centre.

  • Police find body in search for Grace Millane
    BBC News

    Police find body in search for Grace Millane

    New Zealand Police investigating the murder of British backpacker Grace Millane have discovered a body, which they "believe to be Grace". The 22-year-old from Essex has been missing since 1 December but Det Insp Scott Beard told reporters just outside Auckland the "search for Grace" was now at "an end". A 26-year-old man currently being held by police has been charged with killing Miss Millane.

  • Plundered 'Gypsy Girl' mosaics back in Turkey after decades in U.S.
    News
    Reuters

    Plundered 'Gypsy Girl' mosaics back in Turkey after decades in U.S.

    On Saturday, the returned pieces went on display alongside the nearly 2,000-year-old mosaic of the girl, whose piercing gaze and disheveled hair have become a symbol of Turkey's southeastern city of Gaziantep. Turkish archaeologists discovered the mosaic 20 years ago during an excavation of the old city of Zeugma, founded by one of Alexander the Great's generals, near the modern city of Gaziantep. The university initially asked Turkey to buy them back, a request which Ankara rejected, according to Sedat Gulluoglu, Turkey's tourism ministry attache in the United States.

  • Canada Post backlog stalls holiday deliveries
    News
    CBC

    Canada Post backlog stalls holiday deliveries

    Canada Post is still warning it might not get holiday packages delivered on time, as the lingering effects of the recent rotating strikes continue to slow its system. The service's spokesperson, Jon Hamilton, said on CBC's All In A Day that there are a lot of parcels waiting to be delivered. Since the strike officially ended, protests have taken place outside some Canada Post facilities.

  • Small pot growers find roadblocks on path to microcultivation licences
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Small pot growers find roadblocks on path to microcultivation licences

    Yan Boissonneault's daughter was turning blue. Without warning, his baby had stopped breathing, and he frantically performed CPR while his friend James Gallagher called 911. Boissonneault learned that his daughter had a rare disorder that caused epilepsy, and when pharmaceutical medications failed to cure her seizures, he turned to CBD oil, a non-psychoactive substance in marijuana.

  • How Hooligan the horse harnessed vet student talent and the legacy he'll leave
    News
    CBC

    How Hooligan the horse harnessed vet student talent and the legacy he'll leave

    Hooligan the horse is living out his twilight years at Dr. Aimie Doyle's farm on the Green Road in Bonshaw, P.E.I., after 25 years of helping teach students at the Atlantic Veterinary College in Charlottetown. Doyle was assigned to take care of Hooligan's grooming duties in her very first week at the school in 1996, she recalled. Hooligan also bossed around the other teaching horses in the field — mostly mares — running the herd as though he were a stallion, Doyle said.

  • How to find and cut down your own perfect Christmas tree
    News
    CBC

    How to find and cut down your own perfect Christmas tree

    Calgarians wanting to take a more traditional approach to finding the perfect Christmas tree can head to one of three forestry areas west of the city. You just need to get a permit from a forestry office first — there's one at 8660 Bearspaw Dam Road N.W. and another at 3115 12th Street N.E. — at a cost of $5.25, allowing holders to harvest up to three trees, as long as they're under 2.5 metres in height. The three areas where trees can be cut are the Elbow Cutting Area, around Bragg Creek and Sibbald Flats, the Ghost Cutting Area, around Waiparous, and the Turner Valley Cutting Area in the Highwood area.

  • High-tech car theft and talcum powder warning: CBC's Marketplace consumer cheat sheet
    News
    CBC

    High-tech car theft and talcum powder warning: CBC's Marketplace consumer cheat sheet

    The spike in car thefts in the Toronto area even prompted one dealership to ask Lexus to install tracking systems on all high-end SUVs. If you're stocking up on baby powder or other talc products, be careful where you use it.

  • A bright discovery: U of A intern discovers better way to extract diamonds
    News
    CBC

    A bright discovery: U of A intern discovers better way to extract diamonds

    One Grade 11 student's summer research at the University of Alberta has the possibility to change how industry leaders extract diamonds from rocks. As part of a six-week internship called the Wisest Summer Research Program, students get the chance to spend their summer doing research at the university. Hamdi Ali spent this summer at the university's Earth and Atmospheric Sciences department as part of the internship program.

  • Boy who was ISIL captive behind movement to bring bicycles to refugee children
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Boy who was ISIL captive behind movement to bring bicycles to refugee children

    Emad Mishko Tamo looks excitedly at his bright-green mountain bike and talks about how he's looking forward to summer cycling adventures with other Yazidi refugee children in his community. For the 14-year-old boy, the bicycle stands for freedom, something that only a few years ago was snatched away from him and his family when they were taken by Iraqi militants and held captive for three years. Now, he's behind a movement to bring new bicycles to all Yazidi refugee children in Winnipeg.

  • New Brunswick craft alcohol producer wins national tourism award
    News
    CBC

    New Brunswick craft alcohol producer wins national tourism award

    A New Brunswick craft alcohol producer has won a national tourism award at a ceremony in Gatineau. Sebastien Roy, the owner of the distillery, said he didn't expect to win the award. "I was travelling in Gatineau really to be part of that event but just to observe," said Roy.

  • From near-death to boxing champion
    BBC News

    From near-death to boxing champion

    At 15 years old Richard Riakporhe was stabbed and nearly died. He now teaches kids around the UK about the dangers of knife crime. He's also the current WBA Inter-Continental Cruiserweight champion, and says that boxing helped change his life. He told us his story from being on the streets of south-east London to becoming a boxing champion.