Su Pollard tells those on 'PC bandwagon' to 'get real'

Danny Thompson
Contributor
Su Pollard attends a Service of Thanksgiving for the Life and Work of comedian Ronnie Corbett at Westminster Abbey on June 7, 2017 in London, England (Photo by Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images)

Su Pollard has said she believes modern comedy is too politically correct and people only get offended so “their tweet appears on TV”.

Pollard found fame in popular 1980s sitcom He-de-Hi, but feels modern comedy is too PC.

She told the Daily Star: “There’s so many people on the politically-correct bandwagon now.

Read more: Keith Lemon set fire to Su Pollard's curtains filming 'Through The Keyhole'

“We were used to saying certain things and it was just water off a duck’s back. If you’ve grown up saying certain words then you still have it in your psyche. It’s good to be aware of being offensive, but you have to know where to draw the line.

The cast of Hi-de-Hi! wearing Christmas outfits, UK, 19th September 1983; they are (L-R) Paul Shane (1940 - 2013), Jeffrey Holland, Ruth Madoc, Simon Cadell (1950 - 1996), and Su Pollard. (Photo by Len Trievnor/Daily Express/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

“I think nowadays you get people who are offended but don’t really know why. Or they want to be seen to look offended so their tweet appears on TV and they look controversial. I sometimes think: ‘What’s the matter with you? Get real!’”

The 70-year-old star was also spoke the possibility of rebooting Hi-de-Hi, an idea she describes as “a vanity project”.

She played chalet maid Peggy on the show for a number of year and says the show acted as a “springboard to other things”.

She went on to enjoy staring roles in You Rang M’Lord and Oh, Doctor Beeching.

Actors (L-R) Paul Shane, Perry Benson and Su Pollard in a scene from episode 'Beg, Borrow or Steal' of the television sitcom 'You Rang, M'Lord?', November 17th 1989. (Photo by Don Smith/Radio Times/Getty Images)

Despite being known for her light-hearted roles, Pollard is about to swap comedy for serious drama as she undertakes a tour of a one-woman-play called Harpy.

Read more: The creator of 'Benidorm' is bringing new comedy ‘Scarborough’ to the BBC

The production sees her playing a mentally-ill hoarder called Birdie, a much more serious role than that of Ivy Stokes the maid in You Rang M’Lord.

Pollard says she is looking forward to the role as it is “tackling something that used to be taboo”.

In recent years Pollard has made guest appearances on comedies such as Gimme, Gimme, Gimme and Benidorm.

She also took part in Strictly Come Dancing in 2011.

  • Families with members stuck in China call for third Canadian rescue flight
    News
    CBC

    Families with members stuck in China call for third Canadian rescue flight

    Chinese Canadians and others with family stuck in China's Hubei province are calling for the federal government to send a third plane to repatriate Canadians, visa holders and permanent residents alike. The city of Wuhan, China, was locked down in late January, leaving visitors with little or no opportunity to leave.A group that uses the messaging app WeChat to organize represents at least 50 families with loved ones trapped in Hubei province. A letter the group has sent to Global Affairs Canada, and plans to send to several Members of Parliament, states people still trapped either didn't have enough warning to prepare for the two Canadian flights, felt misinformed about who was allowed to board or didn't sign onto the government's registry quickly enough. "We strongly urge the Canadian government to repatriate these families promptly by deploying another chartered flight. The longer this ordeal carries on, and the longer the lockdown continues for these unfortunate individuals, the more danger it will impose on the Canadians stuck there," the letter reads. "We cannot bear the thought of losing our family members if something were to happen in the next few weeks." One Canadian citizen, Elaine Cheng, said she chose not to board either plane after learning her husband, who only has a Canadian visa, wouldn't be allowed to leave the country with her. She opted to stay in Wuhan, and thinks Canada can do better. "I think the way they treat my husband, or someone similar to my husband's situation in China, is totally inhumane," she said by phone Saturday. "Inhumane, uncompassionate and unfair."The B.C.-resident has been trapped in an apartment for the past month with her husband and limited food.Although she has no plans to abandon her husband, she'd like to return home."That's why I do not choose to live just for my own sake, for humanity and compassion purpose," she said. "That's what we, Canadians, advocate in this country and in this world, to other people in other countries, including China."We should not be abandoning anybody that has close ties to us in our life."Cheng said she had heard reports of confirmed coronavirus cases in her apartment building and that was making her nervous."I do hope the government and embassy in China can do their best to move my family and I away from Wuhan," she wrote via WeChat.Global Affairs respondsGlobal Affairs Canada didn't directly respond to questions about whether the department would send a third plane.But a spokesperson said those trapped in Hubei province can contact Canada's embassy in Beijing, call its 24/7 Emergency Watch and Response Centre in Ottawa or send a message to the federal government's SOS email account."We remain in regular contact with Canadians in China and are continuing to provide assistance to those in need to the extent possible," the spokesperson said.Vancouver-resident Yaqi Huang says her 63-year-old father, a permanent resident of Canada, was visiting her grandfather over the Chinese New Year when the city's roads were shut down and planes were grounded.Not only were her father stuck inside the city, he also became separated from the 89-year-old grandfather. "Most people feel scared. They feel nervous. They feel trapped by the government," she said. While Huang initially heard only permanent residents accompanying Canadian minors were allowed to leave – a decision made by Chinese officials – she was surprised to hear stories of permanent residents without young children being allowed to leave Wuhan.After the second plane left, the 37-year-old emailed the Canadian government again."To say, 'So what is the policy for letting people on the flight?'" Huang said. "I say, 'We just need to know the truth.'"Earlier this month, China's deputy director of the Foreign Ministry Information Department said the country would loosen its grip and allow Chinese citizens to fly out of the city, accompanied by foreign family members. In an emailed response to Huang, however, Global Affairs Canada said the Chinese government maintained absolute authority over who could, and who couldn't, board the planes. "We advocated strongly for Canadians, [permanent residents] and their families to be eligible," the email dated Feb. 19 reads.The emailed response says that even if the Canadian government allowed Huang's father to travel to the airport, Chinese officials would have prevented him from boarding the flight."We share your frustration as well. Your parents are, without a doubt, in a difficult situation right now."While Huang wants her father to be repatriated and supports the efforts for a third plane to be sent, she's not hopeful."I know it's a fat chance for the Canadian government to go help, to send an airplane into Wuhan," she said. "It's really hard. We just want to be treated [fairly], like other families."Other reasons to stayKristina Shramko, of Richmond, B.C., said she's been living in Wuhan for eight months.After graduating university, the 21-year-old decided to travel. She visited Wuhan and, after returning to Canada briefly, had been persuaded to return to China by a romantic partner she started dating. When the novel coronavirus epicentre was placed in lockdown, Shramko contacted the Canadian government, hoping to leave the city.  When she heard about the strict no pets policy on both flights, however, she decided she couldn't go.She had recently adopted a cat, named Kitya."Even if I were to leave my cat with a friend, it's not certain when I would come back," Shramko said. "To me, it would be abandoning her."Elaine Cheng, likewise, has concerns about leaving her cat behind in Wuhan. Shramko would like to come home until the outbreak is over, but feels she can't as long as the pet policy is in place. She said outside of her residence "kind of feels like the zombie apocalypse."The Canadian citizen is currently raising money to pay for a plane ticket for her, and Kitya, when travel restrictions on the city are lifted.  "It's really important for people to know that there are people who have decided to stay in Wuhan," she said. Wife is trappedMost of Simon Zheng's family is now stuck in Wuhan, including his wife. The Canadian citizen's partner, who has a work permit designed for spouses, was also visiting China over the holidays. Zheng, a resident of Surrey, B.C., planned to come to Wuhan later in January but was held back by work. Now his wife is stranded with his in-laws and parents, Chinese citizens who live in the city. The small business owner feels if he had been in Hubei province, his wife might have been able to board a plane, like some non-Canadian citizens who were permitted to leave."I was not there, so she wasn't able to [be] included in those kinds of groups," he said.Zheng said he's uncertain how long the lockdown will last and fears his family's limited supplies could run out. But he hasn't given up hope.The WeChat group he is a part of started with fewer than 10 families, Zheng said, and continues to grow. He hopes the federal government takes the pleas of families with loved ones still trapped seriously."I have good faith, because we're doing whatever we can," he said.

  • Blockades remain in place as Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs returning to B.C.
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Blockades remain in place as Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs returning to B.C.

    Hereditary chiefs from the Wet'suwet'en First Nation were expected to return to British Columbia on Sunday after visiting Mohawk communities in Eastern Canada, with no signs that blockades crippling the country's rail network will come down.The actions, particularly one on a critical east-west rail line near Belleville, Ont., are in support of hereditary chiefs who oppose a natural gas pipeline despite support from elected band councils along the route of the project in northern B.C.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Friday that while the government is ready to talk, blockades that began two weeks ago must come down and that the situation is "unacceptable and untenable."Hereditary chiefs have said they are ready for discussions with the B.C. and federal governments after the RCMP and Coastal Gas Link leave their traditional territory.Heredity Chief Na'moks, also known as John Ridsdale, said Sunday that talks were progressing with the Mohawks to take down blockades until Trudeau made his "antagonistic" and "misinformed" speech."If the prime minister had not made that speech the Mohawks would have taken down everything," he said Sunday. "They were ready. We were on the phone."Na'moks said all five hereditary chiefs are expected to meet in northern B.C. on Monday to plan their next steps and talks with the RCMP could resume on Thursday at the earliest.He said the chiefs will not budge from their demands for the Mounties to remove every component of a mobile unit from the 29-kilometre mark from Highway 16 before meeting with them."The local constabulary can look after the patrols," Na'moks said of a detachment in nearby Houston. "The officers that they fly in and out on a seven-day basis is what we want gone from the territory."Dawn Roberts, a spokeswoman for the RCMP, said the mobile unit has been temporarily closed as discussions are underway with the deputy commissioner about its future."This means that the buildings have been locked and secured and that the gates and the fence that's around that property has been locked," she said.Officers who were stationed at the unit are now conducting patrols of the area from the Houston detachment, about 40 minutes away, Roberts said, adding Mounties do not have any plans to meet with the chiefs on Thursday.The chiefs visited supporters this week in Tyendinaga and Kahnawake south of Montreal, and repeated that their conditions for talks to begin have not been met.Woos, of the Grizzly House, told reporters in Kahnawake on Saturday that attempts to reach out to Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller have not been returned since Trudeau's announcement on Friday."It seems to me like ever since Mr. Trudeau has made his announcement, the communication has ceased," Woos said.But senior cabinet ministers said Sunday the federal government remained ready to talk.Speaking Sunday on Global's news and political affairs series "The West Block," the minister for Crown-Indigenous relations styled conversations as productive and that all sides were making good progress.Carolyn Bennett said that "at no time have we stopped negotiations."She added later in the interview that "keeping the conversation open" along with the removal of the RCMP from the Wet'suwet'en territory are "really important criteria to getting us through this difficult patch and on to a good path."She said there are differing opinions within the Wet'suwet'en Nation, and it is the nation itself that has to sort out the divide."Within the Wet'suwet'en community that there are differing opinions and matriarchs, there are people that are speaking up about their issues as well," Bennett told the program."The solution will be found in the Wet'suwet'en community as they come together with their vision of self-determination and how they can form a government and write their own laws."On CTV's "Question Period," Public Safety Minister Bill Blair said the barricades needed to come down and that the federal government is committed to dialogue. He urged the hereditary chiefs to come back to the table."We all understand the importance of a peaceful resolution, but a speedy resolution, because the impact of these barricades is unacceptable, untenable," Blair said."It can't be maintained because of the harm that it is causing and so we have confidence in the police to do the job peaceably."He said that it was the responsibility of the police in each jurisdiction to deal with the blockades and was cool to the idea of the federal government sending in the military to forcibly remove demonstrators."I don't believe personally that it's ever appropriate to put armed services up against Canadians in any part of Canada," Blair told the program."The armed services perform an essential role to this country, but the police also perform an essential role."Some barricades have come down, including one in St-Lambert, Que., late Friday, which will allow the St-Hilaire commuter train line to resume service on Monday, according to Exo, the company that oversees commuter rail service in the Montreal area.Via Rail service has said it is set to resume certain routes, including its Quebec City-Montreal-Ottawa route, on Monday.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 23, 2020.The Canadian Press

  • Fort Macleod, Alta., to get special advance screening of new 'Ghostbusters' film
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Fort Macleod, Alta., to get special advance screening of new 'Ghostbusters' film

    There will be something strange in the neighbourhood of Fort Macleod, Alta., in the next few months.A representative for Sony Pictures Entertainment tells The Canadian Press that the studio is working with the town on putting together a special advance screening of "Ghostbusters: Afterlife."Scenes for the film, which is due out in July, were shot in Fort Macleod and other parts of Alberta last summer.The Sony Pictures representative said Fort Macleod is the only Canadian municipality they are currently discussing a screening with.All other details about the advance screening are to be confirmed.Four-time Oscar nominee Jason Reitman, who was born in Montreal, directs the new instalment in the "Ghostbusters" series.His father, Toronto-bred Ivan Reitman, helmed the original films in the supernatural comedy franchise and produced the new one.Cast members include Carrie Coon, Mckenna Grace, Paul Rudd and Vancouver-bred "Stranger Things" star Finn Wolfhard.Coon plays a single mother alongside Grace and Wolfhard as her kids.The story sees the family moving to a small town just as it begins experiencing paranormal occurrences.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 23, 2020.The Canadian Press

  • How to make Thai sticky rice (Khao Niaow)
    Rumble

    How to make Thai sticky rice (Khao Niaow)

    Watch as Rose prepares and cooks the classic Thai Sticky Rice (Khao Niaow). Serve and enjoy piping hot!

  • Virus closes doors at Armani, but other Milan shows go on
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Virus closes doors at Armani, but other Milan shows go on

    MILAN — The fashion crowd put a defiant face against the spread of a new virus, packing runway shows on the last big day of Milan Fashion Week on Sunday, even as Giorgio Armani made a last-minute decision to stream his latest collection from an empty theatre out of concerns for guests' health.Conde Naste artistic director Anna Wintour took her usual spot in the front-row of Dolce&Gabbana across from a gaggle of global social media Tik-Tok influencers, none of whom were deterred by the spreading virus that had put about a dozen northern Italian towns on lockdown.The Italian National Fashion Chamber said in a statement early Sunday there were no indications from health officials that changes in the schedule were called for, adding that it was up to brands to decide if they would go ahead. Only Armani made changes, among nine shows scheduled.Later in the day, Lombard officials closed theatres, cinemas and other places, like discos and pubs where people might crowd, for at least seven days, as confirmed cases in Italy jumped to at least 152. And Venice officials took the step of cancelling Carnival celebrations, unprecedented in modern times, in a bid to stop the virus spread.Even as the shows went on, the coronavirus threat cast a strange mood over the Italian fashion capital. Despite pockets of activity around the venues at showtime, the city was more empty than normal for an unusually warm winter Sunday, when people from the surrounding province often come for a stroll or to soak in the fashion week energy.Inside shows, just a handful of people wore protective masks.Asked about the impact of coronavirus on the fashion schedule, Wintour pivoted to the unexpected announcement of a collaboration between creative forces Raf Simons and Miuccia Prada at Prada going forward, calling it ‘’the most inspiring news of the season.’’“To me that just shows how we can all be much stronger together at a time when things are so politically divisive. The idea of two creative geniuses coming together supersedes other concerns,'' Wintour told The Associated Press after Dolce&Gabbana.The economic impact of the virus on the wider industry remains a concern. At least 1,000 Chinese journalists, buyers and industry insiders couldn't travel from China, which contributes one-third of global luxury revenues in domestic sales and shopping abroad.The Giorgio Armani fashion house announced overnight his runway show on Sunday would be conducted in an empty showroom and streamed for the fashion public on the internet as a ‘’preventative measure decided by Mr. Armani to support national efforts in safeguarding public health.’’It was the first time the 45-year-old Milan fashion house has taken such a step out of public health concerns, though Armani did stage a show in an empty venue in Paris in 1998 after officials said the big tent posed a safety hazard. At that time, he distributed video of the event to fashion editors, then restaged it in New York to protest what he said had been a decision dictated by fashion world politics and not safety concerns.In streaming, Armani models moved across a dark background, giving contrast to pink, teal and pearl gray silky printed trousers and skirts, while black velvet jackets that blended in with the darkness.The show ended with what notes said was a ‘’message of love for China,’’ where the coronavirus first broke out. Models in glistening, sculpted gowns from archival couture Armani Prive’ collections inspired by China stopped along the runway, while the 85-year-old took a bow to the virtual audience. Empty seats were visible behind him.At Dolce&Gabbana, designers Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana showed a predominantly black and white collection in a world that is anything but. The looks included many iterations of the brand’s famous black dresses, but this season was distinguished by cozy, enveloping knits in oversized stitching. To underline the artisanal quality, the brand’s knitters and other craftspeople demonstrated their skills in the foyer.Tik-Tocker Anna O’Brien, whose videos empowering curvy women are posted as @glittersandlazers, was thrilled to be in the front row of her first-ever international runway show, virus or no.‘’Working in this industry, you learn about the hot story, right? And that’s the hot story right now. Is it a threat? Definitely. But is it the only thing that’s threatening the world right now? Not really,’’ said O’Brien, who travelled from Austin, Texas, to Milan.Earlier Sunday, emerging talent Mariana Rosati was preparing models for its morning show of her Tuscan brand DROMe, which has found fans with Bella Hadid and Ariana Grande. Rosati said she didn't believe there was reason to fear, as models sat nearby waiting for hair and make-up.“I am very sorry what is going on. I know it is not predictable and obviously we need to be careful. But I actually think a lot of panic has been spread for not enough reasons,” Rosati said.Though she expected fewer people would show, it was standing room only for the collection meant to inspire sensuality in women with its oversized jackets complemented by body-defining mini-dresses with deep slits that show off knitted underwear with a vintage feel.“Good vibes,” Rosati said. “This morning the news was that people would not show up. They did and that is great.”Colleen Barry, The Associated Press

  • Israeli jets strike Islamic Jihad targets in Syria and Gaza: Israeli military
    News
    Reuters

    Israeli jets strike Islamic Jihad targets in Syria and Gaza: Israeli military

    JERUSALEM/GAZA (Reuters) - Israeli fighter jets launched air strikes on suspected Islamic Jihad positions in Syria, the Israeli military said on Monday, after the militant group and Israel exchanged rockets and air strikes around Gaza. An Israeli military statement said its forces had "struck Islamic Jihad terror targets south of Damascus" in addition to "dozens" of Islamic Jihad targets throughout the Gaza Strip.

  • Demonstrators gather to show solidarity at Wet'suwet'en rally in Halifax
    News
    CBC

    Demonstrators gather to show solidarity at Wet'suwet'en rally in Halifax

    Hundreds of people gathered in a circle at a downtown Halifax park Sunday afternoon to speak against the Coastal GasLink project in B.C., and to voice opposition to local projects, such as the Alton Gas natural gas project. People at the rally brought signs, including some that said "RCMP off Wet'suwe'ten land" and "Respect land and treaty rights." Demonstrators also chanted "We support the Wet'suwe'ten nation. This is not reconcilliation."The event was held in solidarity with the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs, who oppose a pipeline that would carry natural gas to the B.C. coast through their traditional territory. It comes amid other rallies across Canada this weekend and in recent weeks. Speakers spoke about Indigenous rights and for the need of the RCMP to pull out of the traditional Wet'suwe'ten territory.Organizer Joan Smith said she preferred to think of the event "as education rather than a protest." She said she wants people to realize that Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs are their own nation."Solidarity is a really good word," said Smith, who described herself as a land and water protector who is part of the group Voices of Women for Peace."Education. Getting the support of allies. This, although it's [an] Indigenous-led movement, I think this moment is for everybody."We all drink water. We all use the land. We all need to to know that this is about protection of the land and for our future generations."Protests have disrupted cargo and passenger rail traffic across the country for the last week. Smith said she can appreciate that people in the region are affected by and concerned about propane shortages due to rail blockades, but she said the root problem isn't the protesters."If the government, Justin Trudeau, and all the government behind him, had supported Wet'suwet'en in the first place, we wouldn't have those blockades. So don't blame the people locally for what's happening from our government," she said.The demonstrators marched from the park between South Street and Hollis Street, down Barrington Street and up Spring Garden Road, where they blocked the busy intersection with South Park Street. There, people moved in a circle to the sound of a drum.Demonstrator Paula MacMillan held a sign saying that she supports Wet'suwet'en people and water and land protectors everywhere.She's been opposed to AltaGas's proposal for underground natural gas storage near the Shubenacadie River and the company's plan for discharging salt brine. "We really have to start to take our environment a lot more seriously and do things to halt infrastructure for the fossil fuel industry," she said."And I think Indigenous people have the right to to dictate what goes on on their own land. And the hereditary chiefs definitely have that right."She compared the current protests to other social movements such the push for women's or worker's rights, saying they also involved some public disruption. "The [current] disruptions have always been peaceful. They've never been throwing rocks at anybody or anything like that. So I think that people just have to be patient. And I don't think the government will change or actually deal with these issues if they don't disrupt things a little bit," she said.MORE TOP STORIES

  • News
    CBC

    Last-minute negotiations settle a First Nation's concerns over the Teck Frontier oilsands mine

    The Alberta government has resolved a First Nation's concerns over the Teck Frontier mine, eliminating one obstacle that could have blocked the project's approval.The provincial government and the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation (ACFN) reached an agreement over the weekend after a bitter public dispute between the two parties. The down-to-the-wire negotiations ended ahead of the Liberals' decision on the fate of the $20.6-billion mega-mine this week. "Given the recent discussions with the Alberta government and their fresh and positive approach," Chief Allan Adam said in a news release. "We reconfirm our support of the project and encourage the Canadian government to approve the project without further delay."Adam said his nation and the Alberta government have agreed on a "comprehensive and meaningful package of action items," but the news release doesn't state what those items are.ACFN had accused the province of Alberta dragging their feet on the Dené nation's concerns over water, bison habitat and the need for financial compensation for treaty rights. The provincial government said that it has been in dialogue with the nation and accused the band's Chief Adam of being primarily concerned with money.Each accused the other of delays that could block the project.In July, a federal-provincial environmental panel recommended the approval of the Teck Frontier mine. The mine would disturb 292 square kilometres of pristine wetlands and boreal forest — an area half the size of the city of Edmonton — over its 40-year lifespan, although Vancouver-based Teck Resources would not begin mining the whole area all at once.Two weeks ago, CBC obtained a letter Adam wrote to federal Environment Minister Jonathan Wilkinson. The letter stated it was unlikely ACFN's concerns would be resolved within the prescribed timelines. This disagreement, a federal government source told CBC then, would weigh on the government's decision to approve the mine. The end to this public battle gives opponents of Teck Frontier one less argument. Conversely, it arms the project's cheerleaders with the backing to honestly say all 14 Alberta Métis and First Nations in the immediate sphere of the project support it. Another band in the shadow of the project, the Mikisew Cree First Nation, also issued a press release Friday reiterating its support.The Liberal caucus is divided over the issue.Liberal MP Nathaniel Erskine-Smith told CBC Radio's The House Canada would not be able to meet its net-zero emission target by 2050 if Teck Frontier was approved. On that front, it was announced Friday that Alberta Environment Minister Jason Nixon would enforce a cap on oilsands emissions, which may alleviate concerns over Teck Frontier's greenhouse gas footprint.Teck estimates the project would emit about four million tonnes of direct carbon emissions per year. One environmental group, the Oilsands Environmental Coalition (OSEC), estimated that it would be the equivalent of adding 891,000 cars to roadways.In a statement of his own, Alberta Environment Minister Jason Nixon celebrated the resolution."I am again calling on the federal government to approve the Teck Frontier mine project, given that the major concerns raised by the Joint Review Panel have been addressed," Nixon said."The opportunity that this project presents for our Indigenous communities, our province and the thousands of jobs it would create cannot be killed for political reasons. This project has played by the rules. It has followed the process. It's time to get it done."

  • News
    CBC

    Fraser Health advises local school districts about contacts of latest B.C. coronavirus case

    Health officials in B.C.'s Fraser Valley say contacts of the latest presumptive case of coronavirus in the province may have attended school in the area, but that there is no public health risk in the region.Fraser Health sent a letter to the school district for Maple Ridge and Pitt Meadows, about 40 kilometres east of Vancouver, on Friday, to explain that students had contact with the latest case. It also sent the letter to School District 43, which serves Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody and the villages of Anmore and Belcarra.The letter came a day after provincial officials announced a woman in her 30s, who had returned from a trip to Iran, had tested positive for the novel virus.The case surprised officials when they learned she had only visited Iran, and not China or neighbouring countries that have had the bulk of COVID-19 cases.The latest report from the World Health Organization said that Iran has reported 18 cases and four deaths from the virus.Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnnie Henry said on Thursday that she expected an international investigation into how the woman, who visited Iran, picked up the virus.She said health officials are looking into when the patient's symptoms started to help determine if they need to notify those who travelled with her on the same aircraft. The patient is recovering in isolation at home.Her diagnosis is considered presumptive until confirmed by the National Microbiology Lab in Winnipeg. There are five confirmed cases in B.C. and one presumptive case. There have been no deaths, and the first confirmed patient in B.C. has fully recovered.On Friday, a letter from Fraser Health Medical Health Officer Dr. Ingrid Tyler said that officials were monitoring the patient and speaking with anyone who had contact with her.The letter said that some contacts, "may have attended school in the region and are currently isolated." It did not say how many people attended school or if the contacts were the woman's family members.'No public health risk'Tyler emphasised that the contacts were not showing any signs of symptoms or illness while attending school and are currently well."There is no public health risks at schools in the region," said the letter. "There is also no evidence that novel coronavirus is circulating in the community."Fraser Health is not recommending testing or the assessment of anyone who may have been in contact with the latest case or any asymptomatic individual, no mater their travel or contact history.The letter does remind people to follow proper hygene, such as hand washing, during cold and flu season.It also included other recommendations that have made by other health officials as the spread of COVID-19 increased, such as staying in isolation for 14 days if you come into contact with someone who has been diagnosed with the virus.Globally, more than 78,000 people have been infected with coronavirus in 29 countries.

  • News
    Reuters

    Earthquake in Turkey-Iran border region kills nine, injures more than 100

    Nine people were killed and buildings collapsed across southeastern Turkey on Sunday when a magnitude 5.7 earthquake struck near the border with Iran, injuring more than a hundred in villages and towns in both countries, government officials said. In Turkey, three of the dead were children, and 50 people were injured, including nine critically, the health ministry said. The shallow tremor caused more than 1,000 buildings to collapse in Turkey, prompting a brief rescue effort to find those trapped under rubble.

  • News
    CBC

    BC Ferries president grumbles about 'lower' than expected fare increase set for April 1

    Ferry fares are set to increase April 1 and the president and CEO of BC Ferries is already grumbling about it.Mark Collins says the 2.3 per cent increase to fares will make it "challenging" to pay to replace aging vessels, upgrade technology and improve service.In the fall, the British Columbia Ferries Commissioner approved an average annual rate increase from April 1, 2020 to March 31, 2024."We believe that this regulatory decision, being lower than we expected, may make it more challenging to achieve our corporate objectives," Collins said Friday in a news release.A foot passenger ticket from Tsawwassen to Swartz Bay currently costs $17.20, while taking a standard vehicle on that route costs $57.50.$8.3 million in lossesCollins' comments came with the corporation's release of its third quarter results from Oct. 1 to Dec. 31, 2019, which say BC Ferries recorded a net loss of $8.3 million.It had a net loss of $3.7 million for the same quarter a year earlier.Losses in the corporations' third and fourth quarters are not unusual due to the seasonality of ferry travel and vessel maintenance schedules.Since April 1, 2019, year-to-date net earnings were $98.9 million. The corporation says that is $5.6 million higher than in the same period for 2018.Officials at BC Ferries said that overall revenues are up due to increased vehicle traffic, retail revenue and provincial contributions.However, operating expenses have also increased due to higher labour costs and staffing levels as a result of additional round trips added to sailings.The corporation says it is making significant investments in the service, such as new diesel-electric hybrid ferries, upgrades to the Skeena Queen and Spirit Class vessels and other technology upgrades.Fares were reduced slightly in December 2019 when the corporation eliminated a 1.5 per cent fuel surcharge from each ticket due to a recent decrease in the price of fuel.Those savings amount to a reduction of 25 cents per person and another 85 cents per vehicle.There have been no vehicle fare increases since April 2017 and no passenger fare increases since 2016, according to BC Ferries spokesperson Deborah Marshall.Meeting 'corporate objectives'Collins has not yet responded to inquires from CBC News about how the increase to fares may not be enough to cover improvements and what the consequence may be.BC Ferries carried 22.3 million passengers and 8.9 million vehicles during the fiscal year ending March 31, 2019.It provides year-round ferry transportation services to the West Coast of Canada on 25 routes, currently supported by 35 vessels and 47 terminals.

  • VPD search for high-risk sex offender after he cut off electronic monitoring bracelet
    News
    CBC

    VPD search for high-risk sex offender after he cut off electronic monitoring bracelet

    Vancouver police are warning the public and asking for their help in finding 38-year-old Kirstjon Olson, a provincial sex offender, after he cut off his electronic monitoring bracelet and left his residence against his release conditions.Police say Olson is considered a high-risk sex offender and there are reasonable grounds to fear he will commit a sexual offence against a child under the age of 16.Olson is also under 27 court-ordered conditions, which include complying with electronic monitoring and curfew.He is currently wanted for breach of recognizance for not abiding by those conditions.Police describe Olson as: * 5'8" tall and 245 pounds. * Having brown hair and brown eyes, with a light complexion.Olson left his residence in the Downtown Eastside late Friday night wearing black clothing and a black hat. He was carrying a backpack with red straps. Police ask anyone who sees Olson, or knows his whereabouts, to immediately call 911 or Vancouver police detectives at 604-717-0603.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Governor general says multiple solutions needed for 'complicated' overdose issue

    VANCOUVER — Canada's Governor General visited an overdose prevention site in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside on Saturday after meeting with first responders on the front lines of substance-use issues fuelled by the opioid fentanyl.Julie Payette met at a fire hall with firefighters and police officers as well as officials including Mayor Kennedy Stewart, British Columbia's Lt.-Gov. Janet Austin and Dr. Patricia Daly, the chief medical health officer for the Vancouver Coastal Health authority.Payette said she's learned that the overdose crisis that has caused thousands of deaths across the country is complicated and will require a co-ordinated response including health and mental-health services in order to find solutions and "diminish hardship."She said it wasn't her first visit to the drug-riddled neighbourhood and that she's had a longtime interest in addiction issues."Before I was Governor General of Canada I served on the board of Drug Free Kids Canada," Payette said of the non-profit organization that aims to help parents in particular deal with youth addiction and prevention."My reason to be here today is just to highlight and thank the folks that do this every day," she said of firefighters and police officers who respond to multiple 911 calls daily involving people who have overdosed.After her visit to the fire hall, Payette walked a few blocks with first responders and officials to the Molson Overdose Prevention Site, where people inject their own drugs and other drug users trained to supervise them ensure they get help if they overdose.The site opened in December 2016 under an order from the provincial health minister, seven months after the B.C. government declared the opioid crisis a public health emergency because of a record number of overdose deaths, mostly due to fentanyl.Coco Culbertson, senior manager of programs at PHS Community Services Society, which runs Molson, said Payette's visit may help to reduce the stigma of drug use."She was incredibly empathetic and understanding of how these places offer humanity and dignity to people that often don't have a lot of agency in society," Culbertson said.Molson is around the corner from Insite, North America's first facility to offer drug users a place to walk in off the street to inject their own drugs under the watchful eye of a nurse.Insite opened in 2003 to curb overdose deaths and spiralling HIV rates when the federal Liberals were in power and under an exemption to Canada's drug laws but the facility became the focus of heated court battles with the election of the Conservative government before a unanimous 9-0 decision by the Supreme Court of Canada in 2011 kept the site open.The success of Insite has spawned similar sites across the country including two others in British Columbia, which is also home to 30 overdose prevention sites in B.C., including the one Payette visited.Jonathan Gormick, spokesman for Vancouver Fire Rescue Services, said the governor general's meeting with first responders is meaningful because she's not a politician."I think when she gathers evidence and she advocates for a position it's taken with more validity because it's not based on getting votes, it's not based on towing a party line or saying something just to oppose an opposition party," Gormick said. "Hopefully it will influence some change and be supported across party lines."Health Canada says about 14,000 people died in the country of opioid-related overdoses between January 2016 and June 2019 and thousands more were hospitalized.Later on Saturday, Payette was to meet with five teenage skiers who were hailed as heroes last year for helping to save an eight-year-old boy who was dangling from a chair lift on Grouse Mountain. The teens grabbed a piece of out-of-bounds netting to help cushion the boy's fall after convincing him to jump."I'm the mom of a teenager so I know how important it is to say, 'Hey, good job,'" Payette said.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 22, 2020.Camille Bains, The Canadian Press

  • News
    CBC

    Tribute held in Edmonton for victims of Flight 752 crash

    Edmonton city hall hosted a tribute on Saturday afternoon to remember the victims of Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 that was shot down on Jan. 8.Mayor Don Iveson was at the tribute to officially present the Iranian Heritage Society of Edmonton with a condolence book for victims' families. 176 people were killed when the plane was shot down, including 13 people from Edmonton.Reza Akbari, the Iranian Heritage Society of Edmonton's president, said he and his group have offered support to victims' families both in Canada and Iran. But he said he still doesn't know how to feel 45 days after the crash."Every time I see an image or picture of them, I can't hold my tears. It's not possible to accept such a catastrophe is happening," Akbari said.Akbari said the condolence book presented on Saturday was a beautiful act from the city and its people."This means humanity. This means it doesn't matter where you're coming from, it doesn't matter what your background is, but we all have the same value when it comes to humanity," Akbari said.Before presenting the condolence book, Iveson spoke at the tribute to say the City of Edmonton and its people continue to grieve with those impacted by the crash."It falls to us to hold and remember their dreams, their hopes, their many accomplishments," Iveson said.A common refrain throughout the tribute was 'We will never forget, we will never forgive,' as many called for the Canadian government and its allies to pursue justice by further investigating the crash to find the truth of how it occurred.Iran has said the plane was mistaken for a hostile target amid escalating tensions with the United States. But Canada and its allies have been pushing Iran to release the black boxes from the crash so the data can be properly analyzed by facilities in France.Akbari and many others supported this call on Saturday. Around 15 people organized after the tribute outside city hall in protest to call for justice.Javad Soleimani, spoke at the tribute on Saturday. He lost his wife, Elnaz Nabiyi, in the crash. Soleimani said he also supports the Canadian government's pressure to release information from the plane's black box.Soleimani said he was thankful for the support at the tribute on Saturday, but said the last 45 days have been difficult."It's a pain that you cannot remove." Soleimani said. "You just need to learn how to live with it."

  • News
    CBC

    Young woman arrested and charged in Kelowna stabbing death of 16-year-old

    A young woman has been charged with manslaughter in the stabbing death of 16-year-old Elijah-Iain Beauregard, who died in hospital on June 30 after being stabbed in downtown Kelowna days earlier.The identity of the 18-year-old is protected under the Youth Criminal Justice Act, as she was a minor at the time of incident.The young woman was arrested Friday by the Kelowna RCMP Serious Crimes Unit. Kelowna RCMP announced the charge from B.C. Prosecution Services on Saturday.Elijah-Iain, who went by the nickname Eli, had been living on the streets of Kelowna for about three months before his death, according to his father. Robyn Beauregard said on Saturday from his home in Rimbey, Alta., that his son and the young woman knew each other."It's a little bit celebratory," he said about hearing of the charges. "I'm also looking at it now from the other side, too, right? There's parents on the other side somewhere."It doesn't just affect Eli and his family and all of his friends it's ... there's so many more people that are affected by this now."Beauregard's father, 38, said RCMP went to the grocery store where he works on Friday to tell him about the arrest and charge.'Streets aren't safe'For most of his life, Elijah had lived with his father in Alberta, but eventually, in his teens, went to live with his mother, Emily Steele, in B.C.'s southern Interior.The last time Beauregard spoke with his son, Eli told him he was doing fine on the streets, making his own way. Still, Beauregard offered to bring him back to Alberta the next time he visited, but Eli died before that happened.Beauregard says he has a shrine for his son in his home — there is also one along the shores of Okanagan Lake.Beauregard says he and Steele are working to get a bench dedicated to their son at the Penticton skate park."I just try to do good in my life and get the word out that streets aren't safe for teens to be nowadays," he said. "It's just not a safe place."The young woman will appear Monday before the Youth Justice Court in Kelowna.

  • Western Quebec municipalities, activists aim to curb mining operations
    News
    CBC

    Western Quebec municipalities, activists aim to curb mining operations

    A number of Outaouais politicians, environmental activists and tourism operators are mobilizing against what they consider an explosion in mining exploration in the area.They gathered Wednesday at the Chateau Montebello in Montebello, Que., to voice concerns over the impact mining operations could have on tourism and the environment.They also want the Quebec government to give municipalities the ability to dictate how close mineral exploration and mining can encroach on their boundaries. There's currently little that members of the public or elected officials can do to stop an exploration company from operating close to cottages, businesses and homes, said Ugo Lapointe, Canadian campaign co-ordinator for Mining Watch Canada.Once mining for products like lithium and graphite — crucial for batteries and electric cars — gets underway, it can get messy and noisy, Lapointe told CBC Radio's All in a Day. The work can also be hazardous to groundwater, he added, if chemicals aren't contained properly."For most of these projects it will mean open-pit mining. Open-pit mining requires heavy machinery, heavy equipment blasting, which can be daily blasting or weekly blasting," said Lapointe."So noise, dust, traffic are some of the impacts that are most felt immediately surrounding the operations."List of requestsThe municipality of Papineau, Que., the Lakes of the Petite-Nation protection group and the Conseil régional de l'environnement et du développement durable de l'Outaouais are all calling on Quebec's ministry of energy and resources to take a number of steps, including: * Reconciling tourism activities with economic priorities. * Respecting local communities and their land uses, as well as principles like conservation, biodiversity and ecosystem preservation. * Ensuring public consultations take place to balance mining operations with environmental, social and economic issues.Municipal representatives at Wednesday's news conference also worried increased demand for "critical and strategic" minerals — which are abundant in the Ottawa River watershed — will trump tourism and other economic drivers.According to Lapointe, the province is expected to table its updated policy on key minerals in the next few weeks.

  • Ottawa family reunites, returns home after 2-week quarantine
    News
    CBC

    Ottawa family reunites, returns home after 2-week quarantine

    An Ottawa man says it's good to be free after he and his mother spent the last two weeks in quarantine in Trenton, Ont. "We can do whatever we want," Kai Huang said on his drive home Friday. "I feel very happy."Huang and his 78-year-old mother, Yi, were among 200 people confined to dorm-like lodging at CFB Trenton after being airlifted from Wuhan, China, the epicentre of the country's coronavirus outbreak.The city was placed in lockdown in late January.While Huang is a Canadian citizen, it initially looked like his mother, a permanent resident, wouldn't be able to board either of the two flights Ottawa sent to the city of 11 million. In the end, however, both received a letter from Canada's embassy in China granting passage on a U.S.-chartered flight. "She really appreciates, from her heart, the [Canadian] government," said Huang, acting as the translator for his mother."Because if she lives in China right now, probably she [would have] died. The government rescued her."  Tried to keep busyWhile in quarantine, Huang said he read the news and went for walks. He also wrote a letter of appreciation for the staff at CFB Trenton. The group of evacuees at the military base have raised more than $35,000 for the Canadian Red Cross.When Huang first saw his wife, Bingli Liu, after leaving quarantine, he said there were too many people around to hug her in the parking lot. Liu said she's had to care for the couple's two children by herself for the past two weeks.She's already set up a few chores for her husband. "Shovelling and all that. Outside work, that's all what Kai did."Beyond an impending return to snow shovelling, Huang said he was overjoyed to simply be with his family again. "I can see my son, my daughter and my wife," he said. "That's the most exciting thing."

  • News
    Reuters

    Family furor over Singapore founder's will deepens after tribunal ruling

    The daughter-in-law of Singapore's founding father has been found guilty by a disciplinary tribunal of professional misconduct over her involvement in preparing his will, which is at heart of a feud between the city-state's first family. The latest development in a long-running saga could sow further discord among the prime minister and his siblings - whose father Lee Kuan Yew co-founded the party which has ruled the island nation unbroken since independence - just as an election looms. "I disagree with the Disciplinary Tribunal's report and will fight this strongly when it is heard in open court," said Lee Suet Fern, a lawyer who is married to the prime minister's younger brother.

  • Harvey woman turns old fur coats into fashionable new accessories
    News
    CBC

    Harvey woman turns old fur coats into fashionable new accessories

    Jessie McFadyen keeps a collection of old fur coats hanging inside a small wooden shop beside her home in southwestern New Brunswick.The 55-year-old buys them from Kijiji and Value Village. If she's lucky, some people donate their old coats made from coyote, raccoon and fox fur. "Just fur everywhere," she said.McFadyen refashions the thousands of coats she's kept over the years into headbands, earmuffs, scarves, purses, mittens and hats."I'm using something that a woman years ago … wore to make herself feel good," the seamstress said. "And now I make things from your mother's coat or your grandmother's coat. It's a cherished keepsake."Fur coats have become unpopular in recent years, but sometimes the old coats just don't fit anymore. "We have these things called shrinking closets," McFadyen said with a laugh at her home in Harvey, a village about 42 kilometres southwest of Fredericton. The New Brunswick crafter came up with the idea after her husband, John, came home with a muskrat coat he bought at a yard sale for $10 about 30 years ago."I said quote — unquote, 'What the hell are you going to do with that?'" From old to newMcFadyen has been sewing since she was a little girl, making doll outfits, aprons and pairs of shorts."I've always sewn, whether it was hemming a pair of pants or shortening a pair of sleeves."But she'd never worked with fur. "I didn't know what he was going to do with it."  The muskrat coat sat inside her closet for a few years until John made her a pair of slippers to keep her feet warm in winter.From there, the duo kept going. "We made slipper after slipper after slipper," said McFadyen, who is also the owner of Fur 'N' Things.Then the couple moved on to making different winter accessories from muskrat, beaver and raccoon. The accessories are so warm, people use them for skiing, snowmobiling, snowshoeing and dog sledding. Good for the environment McFadyen learned to sew the fur products from video, books — and with a lot of support from her husband."The rest is all self-taught and trial and error,"McFadyen, who graduated top of her class in Grade 12 home economics, started sewing products together with her metal Singer sewing machine and a leather needle.Over the years, she upgraded to an industrial sewing machine and from there, she to a fur machine."Fur is slippery to work with."Although she's been sewing for more than 30 years, McFadyen was forced to slow down after doctors removed a benign tumour from her brain a few years ago.But she's still a perfectionist. "If I don't like the look of something, it could be one stitch or a whole item, if I don't like the look of it I take it apart and redo it.McFadyen said repurposing old fur is important for the environment because the old coats can be turned into something new, rather than being sent to the landfill. "It's environmentally friendly," she said. "I'm recycling, that's a good thing." Fur 'makes environmental sense'Alan Herscovici, former director of the Fur Council of Canada, said fur clothing is an example of durable and long-lasting material."We've got to get away from this fast-fashion throwaway culture, where things look nice, but they don't last too long," he said. "They're not too expensive, so you buy new things all the time. Throw the rest away and don't think of the mountains of garbage that build up.Rather than synthetic clothing that come from petrochemicals that aren't biodegradable, he said, people should consider buying clothing made of natural materials that are better quality and can be reused."Fur coats are one of the few clothing articles that can be taken apart, totally remodelled and restyled," he said."That makes environmental sense."Then if people don't want to wear these items, the fur can be taken to the back garden compost ,where it can biodegrade and return to the soil. "It's a long-lasting recyclable, natural clothing material that's produced sustainably," he said.

  • Getting around in winter was very different in P.E.I.'s Bygone Days
    News
    CBC

    Getting around in winter was very different in P.E.I.'s Bygone Days

    A hundred years ago, everyone travelled by horse and sleigh on P.E.I. when the snow fell, and autumn's mud season was over. The rivers and bays became the Island's highways, and sleighs would follow what everyone called the "bushed trail" — spruce trees, or sometimes old Christmas trees, were stuck in the ice and snow to mark the path to follow.Roy Clow was born on a farm in 1917 in Murray Harbour North with the help of midwife Lizzie White, who delivered all the babies in the area at that time. He said the local physician, Dr. Lester Brehaut, was "a fine man" and would go out in any kind of weather in his sleigh, which was driven for him by Albert Johnson. Dr. Brehaut would never refuse to treat anyone because they couldn't pay him — in fact he would often leave $5 or $10 on the table when he left a poor household, Clow said. "Every time he came to our place, going to Gaspereaux or somewhere, he'd call in to our place and put the horse in and give him a feed, and sometimes take our horse down and back," Clow recalled.If they knew the doctor was on his way and snow was heavy, Clow and a couple of other local men would go out and "break the road," creating a track with their horses to try to make it passable."He always had a teddy or two of moonshine, he loved a drink of moonshine," Clow said of Dr. Brehaut. "In the wintertime he said that's what kept his feet warm — a good drink of moonshine, hot water and sugar before they started out. Many's the drink he had at our place."  A few decades later, horse and sleigh wasn't the only means of transportation in winter. According to 1963's The Story of Montague by William D. Johnston, Dr. George Inman of Tatamagouche, N.S., began practising in Montague in 1946.Clow said everyone in the area knew when Dr. Inman was making his rounds in winter. "He'd go out in all kinds of weather. He had an old snowmobile in the winter he bought from somebody made out of a Model T Ford, and they put tracks on it like a bulldozer. It was an awful crude-looking thing, it wasn't very much good," Clow said. "But when he couldn't go with his car he'd try to make it with that thing, go over fences and everything."Off to the racesLouis Cantelo was born on the family farm in 1911, and was 98 years old when Dutch interviewed him. Cantelo was from Seven Mile Road, not far from the Grand River."It used to be called the Grand River Road, but there was two Grand Rivers, you see, and they used to get them mixed [up] so they named it Boughton River and named the road Seven Mile Road," Cantelo said. "I used to skate on it and I also promoted horse races on it in the 1940s," he said. "Sometimes we'd have two in a week." The horses would have to be well shod to race on the ice, he said. There were three classes — the speediest horses were in a Class A race, the slowest in Class C. There was a little prize money, he said, and crowds would gather to watch."I don't think there was any betting — sometimes there was a little bit of fighting," he said. "They'd just probably get a little bit too much liquor in them."As an aside, Seven Mile Road got its name because it ran for seven miles without a turn, Cantelo said. The road was later extended further east to Dingwells Mills, which created some confusion."One fella broke down one day and he went to the phone and he called up and he says 'I'm 10 miles out the Seven Mile Road!'" Cantelo said with a laugh. $3 to 'bush' the trailElizabeth MacEwen was born in 1909 in New Dominion on her family's farm on the banks of the West River.A couple of times every winter, her parents would hitch up the horse and sleigh and head down the frozen river to Charlottetown following the trail — her father was paid $3 to "bush" the trail in winter, she said."I remember the cheque coming in — a $3 cheque!" she said with a laugh. "Many's the time they'd call here and wonder if the ice was safe."Their house was right along the river, which back then would be like living on a main road."Droves of horses in the evening coming up from town, we stood out and listened to sleigh bells going by," she said. "The MacPhails always had beautiful horses, they lived down there, and they had always robes on the sleigh. We always knew the MacPhail sleighs going by, right back of the house here."She remembered everyone's sleigh bells sounded slightly different — maybe it was the way the horses trotted. Earl Keefe from Middleton said that they used to stick tissue paper into the bells to stop them tinkling at funerals. Eventually the snow and rain would "melt" the tissue paper and the bells would ring again. 'Cut Street' in CharlottetownThe MacEwens had a menagerie of animals: horses, cattle, and sheep. Her five brothers John, David, George, Gordon and Walter trained a dog to haul a sled, which at the time was perhaps not that unusual — but they also tried to train one of the family's shorthorn cows to pull a sleigh. They also built ice boats, and they'd sail along the ice speeding for town going 50 km/h.MacEwen said her mother handled a horse in harness as well as any man."She didn't mind going to town with the horse," she said. She called the west end of Richmond Street, down by the harbour, Cut Street. That's where the sleighs came to shore off the ice from Rocky Point and down the West River. She herself used to skate into Charlottetown following the bushed path, she said. 'Beautiful-looking people'Nearly everyone had a horse or two in those days: heavy shire horses for plowing fields, and hauling lumber and firewood, and a smaller "blood" or driving horse for hooking up to the sleigh to go to church or town. However, often one horse did double duty.John MacEachern and Ginger MacKay chummed around together in Canavoy near Mount Stewart in their youth. They said there wasn't money for two horses, so after a long day working on the farm, the same horse was hitched up to the sleigh to go courting in the evening. "I often wish if I had time over again, I'd look after them better," MacKay said, recalling his favourite horse, King."We'd drive every night 10 miles with four in the driving sleigh, and them horses [would] just be belting through the snow. And every night we'd be going somewheres."MacKay teased MacEachern about how stylish he was in those days. "He drove the best horses, and he drove the best sleighs, beautiful. Everybody [would] be jealous of him. And he courted the best-looking girl that could be found for miles. And he's still married to her.… They were beautiful-looking people," MacKay said.MacKay was in a band and he said they'd have "a lot of scares" travelling to and from gigs, even after they began driving cars instead of horses. "We used to travel all over the ice in the winter by car, and there was always spring-holes in the ice you had to watch for," he said. Spring-holes were areas where there was a spring, and ice didn't freeze as thick. Those who bushed the track knew about the springs and placed the bushes accordingly, but on stormy nights you couldn't see the bushes, MacKay said.More P.E.I. news

  • Happy Valley-Goose Bay woman pleads for sleeping bags after friend dies on frozen trail
    News
    CBC

    Happy Valley-Goose Bay woman pleads for sleeping bags after friend dies on frozen trail

    A Labrador woman wants to help people who find themselves with nowhere to go after her friend was found dead on a trail in Happy Valley-Goose Bay in freezing temperatures.The last time Dawn Crocker saw Susanna Rich, 46, was Feb. 8 at the Sandbar Lounge, where Crocker works as a bartender. Two days later, a body was found on a trail in the town, and Crocker was heartbroken to learn it was her friend."It's this day and age, 2020, and people are freezing on trails in our little town, and there is absolutely no need. We need to come together as a community and help," Crocker told CBC's Labrador Morning.  "Nobody needs to be dying on the trails because they have no place to go at night," she said.The RCMP say they're working with the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner and the cause of death is yet to be determined.The last time Crocker saw Rich, she gave her coffee and a bite to eat, and then asked her friend if she had a place to go. "I asked her twice, in fact. 'Are you sure? You're not telling me lies, Susanna? You have a place to go, right?" she said. Crocker said Rich assured her she did.  "Had I known she didn't have a place to go, she would have gladly come to my apartment with me," said Crocker, who said she knew Rich for five years.Crocker says she knew Rich for five years, and during that time, often gave her food, rides and kept her out of the cold on many nights.  It's hard to go to sleep at night knowing that someone else may end up freezing to death. \- Sherry Bessey"She was really, really, really loved by everybody who met her," Crocker said."This was her fate, to die in our trail in the middle of town, and it breaks my heart. Nobody needs to do that anymore." Temperatures in Happy Valley-Goose Bay reached a low of  –24 C the day before Rich was found. A 'mind-blowing' responseIn the wake of her friend's death, Crocker has pleaded on social media for sleeping bags to help people sleeping outdoors to stay a little warmer. Crocker's friend Sherry Bessey shared her post right away, and said the response from the community, as well as from people reaching out from across Canada, has been overwhelming.It hasn't only been sleeping bags; blankets, jackets, mittens, scarves and hats are among the donations that Bessey hopes will prevent someone from dying in the cold."It breaks my heart," she said. "It really, really breaks my heart because I have such a comfortable, warm home to go home to, and it's hard to go to sleep at night knowing that someone else may end up freezing to death and it should never happen." Crocker is pleased the Housing Hub emergency shelter in Happy Valley-Goose Bay has accepted her donations, and she's also approaching the Labrador Friendship Centre, Salvation Army and the Nunatsiavut government in hopes they can help distribute items, too.    "If anybody goes to the shelter, and they have to turn them away because of an intoxication issue, 'Here, do you need a sleeping bag? Here's a sleeping bag to go with, a warm coat, do you need a hat, pair of mitts?" she said. Crocker said Rich was a "beautiful soul" who always had a smile no matter how down she was. Right from the start, she said, she knew Rich was a "special lady" who left her mark on her and others in the community. About 30 people attended a candlelight vigil for Rich organized by the the Mokami Status of Women Council in Happy Valley-Goose Bay, and many stayed for a sharing circle in the women's centre afterwards. Open doorsAdvocates for the homeless say there are many reasons why someone can face housing instability and barriers to finding a place to stay.  For the past few years, the Happy Valley-Goose Bay Housing and Homelessness Coalition has been lobbying the province to fund an outreach co-ordinator to meet people on the trails."We'd like to see someone hired who can go out there, talk with the people, refer them to mental health, refer them to AES [Advanced Education and Skills], refer them to wherever they need to go to get some assistance," said Jackie Compton-Hobbs, a town councillor and member of the coalition.   So far, requests have gone unanswered.The emergency shelter, which has a zero-tolerance policy for intoxication, is open from 8 p.m. to 8 a.m. Compton-Hobbs says it's supposed to house eight people but it's maxed out at 14 every night.The coalition has also asked for funding to keep the shelter doors open during the day, but it hasn't been approved. Crocker believes that space needs to be found — whether it's at a church or in another building — to give people a place to stay warm at night, no matter what condition they're in.  "It doesn't matter who you are. Doesn't matter if you're drunk or you're high, or you're black, white or purple, the door is open. You come in, we'll keep you warm," she said.And she urges anyone who comes across a person in distress to call 911 and get help. Unless things change, she said, freezing to death will be a sad reality. In November, Tama Bennett, 23, of Nain was found dead in a tent in the woods in Happy Valley-Goose Bay; there was public criticism over how her death was investigated by police."Open your doors, that's all I have to say. Please, please, please, if you hear me, open your doors and let these people in tonight," Crocker says. She and others plan to walk the trails themselves to hand out warm clothing. "If I can keep 10 people warm tonight, and 10 people warm tomorrow night, and 10 people warm for the rest of the winter — because I'm doing this for Susanna. I don't want anything else to happen to anyone in our community," Crocker said.Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

  • News
    CBC

    Want to write an opinion or point of view piece for CBC British Columbia? Here's how

    Do you have a strong opinion that could change how people think about an issue? A personal story that can educate or help others? We want to hear from you.CBC Vancouver is looking for British Columbians who want to write 500-600-word opinion and point of view pieces. Send us a pitch at bcvoices@cbc.ca and we'll be in touch.How can you contribute?Send us a 100 word pitch for a topic that you want to write about. Let us know what you think the headline should be (this might change, but it's a good starting point). If you can't sum your pitch into a one sentence headline, then it's likely the topic is too broad. A good point of view or opinion piece will explore one angle in depth, rather than a broad overview. For example:  * "B.C. needs to do something about climate change" is a big beast to tackle in 500 words. * "B.C. needs to provide incentives for purchasing electric cars" is more feasible and clearly sets up your position, while also setting up a debate.Tell us why this topic matters and why it would be of interest to an audience. Perhaps the piece isn't for everyone, but it should still be worth reading for people from a variety of backgrounds and walks of life.Once your pitch has been approved, you'll work with a producer to finesse your writing. Who can send in a pitch?We're looking for passionate writers, but passion alone won't be enough. While you don't need to be an academic expert or have a PhD on the subject, you do need to make the case that you're qualified to talk about it. First-time contributors are welcome, and you must have a clear connection to British Columbia. We do not accept pitches from politicians, people running for office or employees of political parties.We also encourage writers and people reading opinion columns to participate in the comment section attached to published submissions and on social media.Why is CBC News doing opinion?Opinion isn't new to the CBC — we've offered it in different forms on radio and television for decades, and many of our regional websites run opinion pieces written by members of our audience.This section is intended to bring those voices together in one place and to help develop and showcase a wide range of commentary from across the country. Our goal is to give the audience access to competing ideas which will complement our news coverage and provide additional insight.What is the difference between analysis and opinion?Good journalism does more than report facts; it also provides context. Our journalists will continue to bring their own experiences, knowledge and insight to bear in analysis pieces. Opinion pieces, though, go further; there is more latitude for the writer to be definitive about which side of a particular argument deserves support.However, engaging in this way should not spark questions about the independence and impartiality of CBC News journalism. So every opinion column will be clearly labelled to prevent confusion, and anyone who writes opinion for CBC News will not be involved in our traditional news coverage. You can read more about this in an editor's blog post on the topic.What's the difference between an opinion and a point of view?A point of view is a personal story that you want to share. This is your opportunity to write in first person about something specific that happened to you. Your story should be something that our readers can relate to through your writing, because it might be something they too have experienced or it offers a unique perspective on a situation. An opinion offers just that. Ideally, you're arguing a specific position based on your collective experience and scientific research.Examples of a point of view:Examples of opinions:How do you disclose conflicts of interest?Anyone writing an opinion piece for CBC will be asked to disclose any potential conflicts of interest. CBC will determine which conflicts need to be brought to a reader's attention in the author's bio field when the submission is published.Some more examples for inspiration:

  • Pilot project could see DIY performances in vacant city buildings
    News
    CBC

    Pilot project could see DIY performances in vacant city buildings

    As rental prices skyrocket downtown and high-profile music venues close, it's becoming more difficult for emerging musical artists to afford spaces to create and perform, but now the city is designing a pilot project to provide spaces for musicians at low cost, or no cost.Coun. Joe Cressy, who represents Ward 10, Spadina-Fort York and chairs the Toronto Music Advisory Committee, says spaces for so-called Do It Yourself organizers are becoming rare."For a lot of musicians, you don't start out playing at the Horseshoe Tavern or the Danforth Music Hall," said Cressy."Everybody needs to get their start somewhere and that's where DIY venues are so important."With space downtown at a premium as condominium projects replace entire blocks of once rentable rehearsal or performance venues, musicians are having a harder and harder time being able to access affordable DIY spaces."They're just too expensive. And so if we lose the DIY spaces we lose the next generation of live musicians," said Cressy.On Thursday, Cressy's committee approved staff recommendations to develop a pilot program for DIY music organizations to use city-owned spaces at lower than market value. "The city is one of the largest landowners. We have thousands of pieces of real estate, far too many of which are being underutilized," Cressy said."And so the opportunity to provide a venue at a below market rents, where the insurance is covered by the city, for new and emerging artists to be able to create art and express art is just low hanging fruit," said Cressy.He suggested some city owned properties, such as the decommissioned subway station at Lower Bay or the Canada Malting Silos, could make for interesting musical performance venues."You know that the use of the Hearn [Generating Station] for the Luminato Festival demonstrates that not only can we do a better job of providing affordable and accessible spaces for DIY artists and musicians at large, but it also shows you that when you use a unusual or not expected performance space often it brings a whole other character and interest to the performance as well," Cressy said.But those who already run affordable DIY venues say they need support too.Mark Wilson, the chair and treasurer of Array Music, approves of Cressy's attempts to find more artistic space, but says existing places need to be nurtured.Array Space at 155 Walnut Ave., west of Bathurst Street. and south of Richmond Street, is a second-floor warehouse venue that seats about 60 people comfortably and can be rented for as low as $25 an hour."We already host more than a couple hundred events a year in the DIY space. And I think what I am asking the city to do is also consider extending further support to existing DIY spaces," said Wilson."I think they should also be looking at what additional support they can provide to the existing spaces as opposed to just inventing new infrastructure."Wilson says the space is not just used by up-and-coming experimental artists, but established performers."There's lots of emerging artists. But ... artists who are quite senior in their careers and perhaps are at the experimental edge of things are still looking for places to invent new work. And we offer them that opportunity."Staff with the Toronto Music Advisory Committee and Economic Development and Culture have conducted consultations with DIY music stakeholders, along with city staff in Corporate Real Estate Management.  At the committee's next meeting in May, staff will have an inventory of city-owned properties suitable for tenancy and develop the terms of a pilot program. Any pilot program would have to be approved by city council and could be launched in the fall.

  • Halifax businesses not likely to be compensated for losses due to construction
    News
    CBC

    Halifax businesses not likely to be compensated for losses due to construction

    Any Halifax business hoping to be compensated for lost revenue because of construction shouldn't hold its breath.On Tuesday, Halifax regional council will voting on a plan to update an administrative order on municipal construction bylaws.While it includes a plan to deal with rodents, compensation to businesses that lose money because of construction is out of the question.The staff report acknowledged concern businesses in downtown Halifax have about impacts to their operations from construction projects, and notes the call for compensation to help offset lost income.But it says there is "no ability" under the HRM charter for the municipality to compensate businesses affected by longer-term street closures where the municipality is acting within the scope of its authority and not undertaking the work itself.While compensation "remains and issue for the business community," the report notes the intent of the administrative order is to lessen the impacts of construction and "avoid disruption of business activities."Those concerned about rodents from construction should be pleased with the administrative order's amendment that includes a rodent-control plan.Currently, there are no requirements in existing guidelines for rodents.The new administrative order would require a rodent-control plan to be provided for all cases where a construction-management plan is required, unless exempted by an engineer.MORE TOP STORIES

  • Montreal photographer captures period of dramatic change in Griffintown
    News
    CBC

    Montreal photographer captures period of dramatic change in Griffintown

    Over a period of two years, Montreal photographer Robert Walker took close to 1,000 photos of Griffintown."It made for a very dramatic contrast between these old structures and the new condos going up," he told CBC Montreal's Let's Go."The changes there are just so dramatic. Over the last five years it's gone from kind of a desolate place of derelict factories and horse stables to what it is today — a forest of sparkling new condos."Walker was commissioned by the McCord Museum to work on a photo project documenting the changing neighbourhood in Montreal's Sud-Ouest borough.He selected 20 of his favourite photos to be displayed in large format, as part of an exhibit called Griffintown – Evolving Montréal.The exhibition also features a slide show which displays about 100 other photos from Walker's project, along with some historical information about the area.Born in Montreal in 1945, Walker studied painting at Sir George Williams University (now Concordia University).He said in documenting the neighbourhood — which appears in a permanent state of demolition and construction — he focused on colour, gravitating toward the more "eye-catching" elements.Walker also aimed to present images that hint at the neighbourhood's not-so-distant past as a working-class, industrial area."Some pictures, they really act symbolically to evoke a nostalgia for the past," he said. "I try to somehow capture the older Griffintown that's no longer there. Most of it's been demolished."Griffintown – Evolving Montréal, runs at the McCord Museum until August 9.